Appendix C
Committee Member Biographies

Gary W. Williams (chair) is professor and coordinator of the Texas Agribusiness Market Research Center in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Williams received a B.S. (1974) in economics from Brigham Young University and an M.S. (1977) and Ph.D. (1981) in agricultural economics from Purdue University. He has been a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association since 1976, and served on the editorial council of the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics from 2001 to 2003. From 1992 to 1994, he served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Livestock Disease Eradication: Bovine Tuberculosis. Williams’ research has focused on lamb production and consumption and the effects of policy on domestic and international trade. He is an expert in agricultural economics and the sheep industry and lamb market.


DeeVon Bailey is professor and extension marketing specialist in the Department of Economics at Utah State University. Bailey received a B.A. (1980) in economics, an M.S. (1981) in agricultural economics, both from Utah State University, and a Ph.D. (1983) in agricultural economics from Texas A&M University. He has received awards from the American Agricultural Economics Association (1997) and the Western Agricultural Economics Association (1997, 2005, and 2006) for outstanding extension projects. Bailey has also received the top research award offered by Utah State University (2006) and USU’s top extension award (2003). Bailey is an expert in consumer preferences and meat traceability programs in red meat markets. He is familiar with the sheep industry in the Northwest and Intermountain areas of the United States.



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Appendix C Committee Member Biographies Gary W. Williams (chair) is professor and coordinator of the Texas Agribusi- ness Market Research Center in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Williams received a B.S. (1974) in economics from Brigham Young University and an M.S. (1977) and Ph.D. (1981) in agricultural economics from Purdue University. He has been a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association since 1976, and served on the editorial council of the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics from 2001 to 2003. From 1992 to 1994, he served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Livestock Disease Eradication: Bovine Tuberculo- sis. Williams’ research has focused on lamb production and consumption and the effects of policy on domestic and international trade. He is an expert in agricultural economics and the sheep industry and lamb market. DeeVon Bailey is professor and extension marketing specialist in the Depart- ment of Economics at Utah State University. Bailey received a B.A. (1980) in economics, an M.S. (1981) in agricultural economics, both from Utah State University, and a Ph.D. (1983) in agricultural economics from Texas A&M University. He has received awards from the American Agricultural Economics Association (1997) and the Western Agricultural Economics Association (1997, 2005, and 2006) for outstanding extension projects. Bailey has also received the top research award offered by Utah State Uni- versity (2006) and USU’s top extension award (2003). Bailey is an expert in consumer preferences and meat traceability programs in red meat markets. He is familiar with the sheep industry in the Northwest and Intermountain areas of the United States. 

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 APPENDIX C Oral Capps, Jr. is a professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. Capps received a B.S. (1975) in mathematics, an M.S. (1977) in agricultural economics, an M.S. (1979) in statistics, and a Ph.D. (1979) in agricultural economics, all from Virginia Polytechnic Insti- tute and State University. He served as president of the Southern Agricultural Economics Association from 1992 to 1993 and has received many awards for both his research and teaching, including the American Agricultural Eco- nomics Association Distinguished Teaching Award in 1999, the American Council on Consumer Interests’ Applied Consumer Economics Award (co- recipient) in 1999, and the Agricultural and Resource Economics Reiew Outstanding Journal Article Award (co-recipient) in 2000. Capps’ areas of expertise include the economics of health and nutrition, agribusiness, con- sumer demand analysis, agricultural marketing, evaluation of commodity checkoff programs, and applied econometrics. Linda A. Detwiler is assistant director for the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Maryland and is a pri- vate animal health consultant. Detwiler received a B.S. (1980) in dairy sci- ence from Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture and a D.V.M. (1984) from the Ohio State University. She has worked in private food ani- mal practice, but has spent the bulk of her career overseeing public animal health programs for USDA APHIS. She has chaired several advisory groups for international organizations including the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organization for Animal Health, as well as national governments. These groups include WHO’s Consultation on Public Health and Animal Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy Diseases (co-chair, 1999) and the Working Group on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Sheep (2001). Detwiler has experience with sheep diseases with the primary focus on prion diseases such as scrapie and has assisted the sheep industry in its efforts to control scrapie beginning in 1985. Hudson A. Glimp is Edwin L. Wiegand Professor Emeritus at the University of Nevada–Reno (UNR). Glimp received a B.S. (1960) in animal science and an M.S. (1961) in animal nutrition, both from Texas A&M University, and a Ph.D. (1964) in animal nutrition from Oklahoma State University. Before moving to UNR, Glimp worked in sheep research for the USDA and private firms. From 1987 to 1990, he was the director of the USDA Sheep Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho. He served as the UNR’s sheep extension specialist for 15 years. Glimp is currently the coordinator of a UNR research station, Rafter 7 Ranch, which specializes in Merino sheep breeding programs and has produced the premier wool of the United States for the past several years.

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 APPENDIX C Timothy Hammonds is president and CEO of the Food Marketing Institute (FMI), a nonprofit organization that provides guidance to the food distri- bution industry through research, education, and programs in industry relations, policy, and consumer information. Hammonds received his B.S. (1966), M.B.A. (1967), and Ph.D. (1970) from Cornell University. He has served on many committees for the National Research Council, including the Committee on Nutrition Components of Food Labeling, Committee on Technological Options to Improve Nutritional Attributes of Animal Products, and Committee on Food Consumption Patterns. He currently serves as chairman of the board of the National Partnership for Food Safety Education. Before moving to FMI in 1975, Hammonds taught agricultural economics at Oregon State University. Douglas D. Hedley is the executive director of the Canadian Faculties of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, an organization of deans and presi- dents of faculties of agriculture and veterinary medicine in Canada. These faculties represent researchers, educators, and scientists who investigate questions about agriculture, food, health, and environment. Hedley earned a B.S. (1965) from the University of Guelph and an M.S. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) in agricultural economics from Michigan State University. In ad- dition to extensive work as a scholar and policy advisor in Nigeria and Indonesia, he has held several positions for Agriculture Canada since 1972, among them assistant deputy minister, Programs Branch in Agriculture and Agri-food Canada. From 1997 to 2000, Hedley served as president of the International Association of Agricultural Economists and was the founding editor of Agricultural Economics. Helen H. Jensen is a professor of economics and head of food and nutri- tion policy research in the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development at Iowa State University. Jensen received a B.S. in economics from Carleton College, an M.S. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has served on five committees and panels for the National Research Council, including the Panel on Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine, Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals, and the Committee on Assessing the Nation’s Frame- work for Addressing Animal Diseases. Currently she is serving on the board of directors of the American Agricultural Economics Association and the American Council of Consumer Interests, as well as the editorial boards of Food Economics, Agricultural Economics, and Agribusiness: An Interna- tional Journal. Jensen is an expert in consumer consumption patterns and food safety.

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 APPENDIX C Paul S. Kuber is an assistant professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at The Ohio State University. Kuber received a B.S. (1991) from California State University–Fresno, an M.S. (1993) from the University of Nebraska, and a Ph.D. (2001) from Washington State University. He has worked in the lamb slaughter and processing industries in both California and Aus- tralia. Kuber’s areas of expertise are meat science, particularly fresh and processed meat quality; consumer perception and preference; and product development. David L. Thomas is a professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Thomas received a B.S. (1971) in meat and animal science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and an M.S. (1975) in animal science and a Ph.D. (1977) in animal breeding, both from Oklahoma State University. In 2003, he received the Award for Recognition of Outstanding Contributions to the Dairy Sheep Industry of North America from the Dairy Sheep Association of North America. He has received three awards from the American Society of Animal Science: the Animal Breeding and Genetics Award (2003), the Animal Management Award (2004), and the Bouffault International Animal Agriculture Award (2005). Thomas’ areas of expertise include sheep genetics and dairy sheep production.