Appendix C
Speaker and Panelist Biographies

Douglas E. Adams conducts fundamental and applied research in structural state awareness for aerospace and automotive systems. He has graduated 17 Ph.D. and M.S. students, published more than 130 papers, authored or edited several book chapters, and delivered 15 short courses and more than 50 invited seminars and keynote addresses. He has also recently published a textbook on health monitoring of structural materials and components for John Wiley and Sons. He has received 13 research and teaching awards, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President George W. Bush and the 2003 Structural Health Monitoring Person of the Year Award; he has recently been named a Purdue University Faculty Scholar. Dr. Adams has also been inducted as a fellow in the Purdue Teaching Academy. Many of his research discoveries have been developed and fielded for use by industry and defense agencies; for example, he has recently deployed 22 crack-detection kits for the U.S. Army for condition-based maintenance of a ground vehicle wheel assembly. He has also developed a load-monitoring system for the next-generation composite precision attack missile and is working to develop damage identification methods for the next-generation heavy-lift helicopter.

Richard H. Bossi is a senior technical fellow for NDE on the physics staff of Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington. He received his B.S. degree from Seattle University in 1971 and his Ph.D. from Oregon State University in 1977. Dr. Bossi has more than 30 years of experience in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Following graduate school he spent 1 year at Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires in Grenoble, France, 5 years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and 4 years at Sigma Research before joining the Boeing Company in 1988. He has worked on a variety of programs dealing with material characterization using NDE technology, including radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, and data fusion. Dr.



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Appendix C Speaker and Panelist Biographies Douglas E. Adams conducts fundamental and applied research in structural state awareness for aerospace and automotive systems. He has graduated 17 Ph.D. and M.S. students, published more than 130 papers, authored or edited several book chapters, and delivered 15 short courses and more than 50 invited seminars and keynote addresses. He has also recently published a textbook on health monitoring of structural materials and components for John Wiley and Sons. He has received 13 research and teaching awards, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from President George W. Bush and the 2003 Structural Health Monitoring Person of the Year Award; he has recently been named a Purdue University Faculty Scholar. Dr. Adams has also been inducted as a fellow in the Purdue Teaching Academy. Many of his research discoveries have been developed and fielded for use by industry and defense agencies; for example, he has recently deployed 22 crack-detection kits for the U.S. Army for condition-based maintenance of a ground vehicle wheel assembly. He has also developed a load-monitoring system for the next-generation composite precision attack missile and is working to develop damage identification methods for the next-generation heavy-lift helicopter. Richard H. Bossi is a senior technical fellow for NDE on the physics staff of Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington. He received his B.S. degree from Seattle University in 1971 and his Ph.D. from Oregon State University in 1977. Dr. Bossi has more than 30 years of experience in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Following graduate school he spent 1 year at Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires in Grenoble, France, 5 years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and 4 years at Sigma Research before joining the Boeing Company in 1988. He has worked on a variety of programs dealing with material characterization using NDE technology, including radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, and data fusion. Dr. 53

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54 Proceedings of a Workshop on Materials State Awareness Bossi also served as the quality assurance team leader for the Composite Affordability Initiative program, developing methods for bonded joint characterization. He chairs the annual Boeing NDE Technical Forum meeting, is a fellow of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing, and serves as an associate technical editor for Materials Evaluation and as a contributor to and technical editor for ASNT handbooks. Lisa J.H. Brasche is an associate director for CNDE and a program manager for the Federal Aviation Administration Center for Aviation Systems Reliability and for Engine Titanium Consortium, as well as the director of the Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence program at Iowa State University. She received her B.S. in materials science and engineering from North Carolina State University and her M.S. in metallurgy from Iowa State University. Prior to her graduate career, Ms. Brasche served as an intern at Duke Power Company in its NDT and Nuclear Maintenance Division. Her research efforts include evaluation of materials properties and detection of detrimental mechanical conditions using nondestructive techniques in ferrous and nonferrous alloys, improving the effectiveness of fluorescent penetrant inspection, practical uses of inspection simulation, and probability-of-detection studies. Ms. Brasche has authored over more than 30 publications and holds one patent. Brian Cox received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Monash University, Australia, and has worked at Teledyne Scientific (formerly Rockwell Scientific and Rockwell Science Center) for 25 years. His current interests include materials design and modeling materials failure. Thomas Cruse is the former chief of technologies at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and a professor emeritus at Vanderbilt University. He has also worked at the Southwest Research Institute as the program director for reliability, and prior to that, as director of the Engineering Mechanics Department. Dr. Cruse has also held positions at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Boeing Company. He holds a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from the University of Washington and M.S. and B.S. degrees in engineering mechanics and mechanical engineering, respectively, from Stanford University. Dr. Cruse is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME, for which he chaired the Applied Mechanics Division), the American Academy of Mechanics, and the U.S. Association for Computational Mechanics. He is the past president and founder of the International Association for Boundary Element Methods. W.A. Curtin received a combined 4-year Sc.B./Sc.M. degree in physics from Brown University in 1981 and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Cornell University in 1986, working on the optical properties of metal nanoparticles and on statistical mechanics theories of freezing. Professor Curtin then joined the Applied Physics Group at the British Petroleum Research Laboratories (formerly SOHIO) in Clevelend, Ohio, where he worked on hydrogen storage in amorphous metal alloys, the statistical mechanics of crystal/melt interfaces, and the mechanics of ceramic and composites. In 1993, he joined the faculty at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University with a joint appointment in materials science and engineering and engineering science and mechanics. In 1998, Professor Curtin returned to Brown University as a faculty member in the Solid Mechanics Group of the Division of Engineering and was appointed the Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor in 2006. A current overall theme of Professor Curtin's research is multiscale modeling of the mechanical behavior of materials, with specific applications to atomistic/continuum models of plasticity and fracture, solute hardening in aluminum alloys, fiber composites, and impurity/defect diffusion. Other current work includes experiments and modeling of carbon-nanotube-based ceramic composites, electrical sensing of

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Appendix C 55 damage in polymer composites, and mechanics of complex microstructures. Professor Curtin is director of the Center for Advanced Research Materials at Brown University and director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at Brown. He was appointed as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2006, has published more than 125 technical papers, and has presented many invited talks at national and international venues. John C. Duke, Jr., is a professor and director of the Nondestructive Evaluation Development Laboratory at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He holds Ph.D., M.S.E., and B.E.S. degrees in mechanics and materials science from the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Duke’s interests are in nondestructive measurement science, testing, and evaluation; experimental mechanics; materials behavior, micromechanical materials characterization; evaluation of advanced materials and bonded joints; civil infrastructure assessment; nondestructive evaluation of electronic components; and packaging for process manufacturing. Charles R. Farrar has 25 years of experience as a technical staff member, project leader, and team leader at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). He is currently the director of the Engineering Institute at LANL. While at Los Alamos, he earned a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of New Mexico in 1988. The first 10 years of his career at LANL focused on performing experimental and analytical structural dynamics studies for a wide variety of systems, including nuclear power plant structures subject to seismic loading and weapons components subject to various portions of their stockpile-to-target loading environments. Currently, his research interests focus on developing integrated hardware and software solutions to structural health monitoring problems and the development of damage prognosis technology. The results of this research have been documented in more than 280 publications, as well as in numerous keynote lectures at international conferences. In 2000 Dr. Farrar founded the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. His work has recently been recognized at Los Alamos through his reception of the inaugural Los Alamos Fellows Prize for Technical Leadership and by the Structural Health Monitoring community through the reception of the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award in Structural Health Monitoring. He is currently working jointly with engineering faculty at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) to develop the LANL/UCSD Engineering Institute with a research focus on damage prognosis. This initiative is also developing a formal, degree-granting educational program in the closely related areas of validated simulations and structural health monitoring. Dr. Farrar’s additional professional activities include his current appointments to associate editor positions for the International Journal of Structural Health Monitoring and Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics, and the development of a short course entitled “Structural Health Monitoring: A Statistical Pattern Recognition Approach” that has been offered more than 15 times to industry and government agencies in Asia, Australia, Europe, and the United States. In 2007, Dr. Farrar was elected to the position of fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Thomas Farris is professor and head of the Purdue University School of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He received a B.S.M.E. in 1982 from Rice University and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from Northwestern University in 1986, at which time he joined Purdue. His teaching and research interests are in tribology, manufacturing processes, and the fatigue and fracture of aerospace structures. He has supervised more than 40 M.S. and Ph.D. theses, authored or co- authored more than 100 archival publications, and has one patent. He has been acknowledged for research by an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, a fellowship from the Japan Society

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56 Proceedings of a Workshop on Materials State Awareness for the Promotion of Science, ASME’s Burt L. Newkirk Award, the ASME/Boeing Structures and Materials Award, and the Journal of Strain Analysis P.E. Publishing Award. He is currently a member the executive committee of the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME, of which he is a fellow, and he is a consultant to the Army Science Board. Wm. Garth Frazier received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Mississippi State University and his Ph.D. from Ohio University. All of his degrees are in electrical engineering, with emphases on dynamical systems theory, automatic control, and signal processing. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. Frazier worked at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, as an onsite contractor and as a government civilian employee. His research there focused on the application of dynamical systems theory and optimal control to the design of thermomechanical materials processes. In 1999 he was selected as an Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) for his work in that area. Also in 1999, he was selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s Frontiers of Engineering Program. In 2000, Dr. Frazier accepted a position in industry in which he led the development of acoustic signal processing and multiple-target tracking algorithms for a large U.S. Army battlefield acoustics research program. Since 2002 he has helped to develop two research programs managed by the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL, that are directed toward the development and demonstration of dynamical systems theory techniques applied to structural health monitoring applications. In particular, Dr. Frazier is interested in the development of systematic, model-based engineering design methods. He currently works as an independent consultant supporting research and development in battlefield acoustics and in structural health monitoring. J.P. Gallagher retired as the USAF Technical Advisor for Aircraft Structural Integrity, Engineering Directorate, Aeronautical Systems Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, on July 31, 2007. He is a recognized authority in aircraft structural integrity; in that capacity he provided technical oversight, advice, and guidance to the highest Air Force and government officials and to numerous national aerospace weapons system programs. Starting in October 2002 as technical advisor for aircraft structural integrity, he led the Air Force structures community by establishing a clearly defined Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP) that is now documented by a Department of Defense (DOD) standard (MIL-STD-1530C), which provides the framework for managing the structural integrity of aircraft weapons systems. His efforts corrected key problems associated with policy, technical approaches, and oversight of this critical integrity program. Dr. Gallagher also led numerous independent review teams that forged solutions to critical structural safety-related problems affecting the safety, availability, and cost of maintaining the A-10, F-22, F-16, C-130, KC-135, and C-5 aircraft. Recommendations from these efforts were implemented and have ensured the continuing safety and performance of these critical Air Force aircraft. Before assuming the position as USAF technical advisor for aircraft structural integrity, Dr. Gallagher held various positions at the University of Dayton and the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) between 1978 and 2002. When he retired from the university after about 25 years of service, he held a joint appointment with UDRI and as a professor who taught in the graduate materials program in the School of Engineering. Within UDRI, he held multiple positions, including those of Sustainment Center director, head of a division, group leader, and principal investigator. Dr. Gallagher received his bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from Drexel University and his master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees in theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois.

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Appendix C 57 Kumar V. Jata is a research scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Directorate’s Metals, Ceramics, and Nondestructive Evaluation Division. Basic research conceived and performed by Dr. Jata has had a significant impact on the Air Force's aircraft and space materials programs. Aircraft and space launch companies are using the scientific concepts and findings generated in his research for the design of Al-Li metal cryotanks for access to space and for the improvement of the structural performance of fielded aircraft and space systems. His research on friction stir joining and processing is already having a significant impact on the manufacture of metal cryogenic tanks for space access, new ways to manufacture future aerospace structures, and replacement of fasteners in fielded aircraft. Dr. Jata's science and technology leadership in this area is evidenced in a number of research and development collaborations with industry, government laboratories, and universities. He has been an invited colloquium speaker on this subject at various universities and conferences at Drexel University, the University of Utah, the University of Virginia, and Ohio State University; Light Materials for Transportation (Korea); the International Conference on Aluminium Alloys (Virginia); and NATO Structural Metallic Materials with High Efficiency (Kiev, Ukraine). Dr. Jata is the lead editor of the Friction Stir Joining and Processing Conference Proceedings, which accompanies a conference held by TMS every 2 years. Between 2000 and 2003, Dr. Jata published six refereed journal articles in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions, Scripta Materiala, and International Journal of Fatigue. Twenty-two conference papers and presentations have also evolved from his work during this time period. Dr. Jata holds a doctorate degree in materials science from the University of Minnesota. He was elected as a fellow of the ASM International in 1998. He is also an adjunct professor at the Wright State University and a mentor for younger engineers and scientists. Robert H. Latiff is vice president, chief engineer and technology officer in Science Applications International Corporation’s Space and Geospatial Intelligence Business Unit. He is recently retired from the U.S. Air Force as a major general, with his last assignments at the National Reconnaissance Office as the director for Systems Engineering and as the director of Advanced Systems and Technology. General Latiff was a career acquisition officer, managing large complex systems such as the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, the Air Force’s airspace management and landing systems, and the Joint Strategic Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS). Dr Latiff holds a M.S. and a Ph.D. in materials science and a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame. William Q. Meeker is a professor of statistics and Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Iowa State University. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a past editor of Technometrics. He is co-author of the books Statistical Methods for Reliability Data with Luis Escobar (1998) and Statistical Intervals: A Guide for Practitioners with Gerald Hahn (1991); of four book chapters; and of numerous publications in the engineering and statistical literature. He and his co-authors have won the American Society for Quality (ASQ) Youden Prize four times and the ASQ Wilcoxon Prize three times. In 2001, he and his co-author were recognized by the American Statistical Association with the Best Practical Application Award. He has consulted extensively on problems in reliability data analysis, reliability test planning, accelerated testing, nondestructive evaluation, and statistical computing. Shridhar Nath joined GE Global Research (GE-GR) in March 1997 and has been the manager of the Nondestructive Technologies Laboratory since November 2001. The team is involved in several nondestructive evaluation (NDE) modalities, including radiography,

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58 Proceedings of a Workshop on Materials State Awareness ultrasound, electromagnetics, and infrared imaging. At GE-GR, the team supports all of the GE businesses, including aviation, energy, oil and gas, inspection technologies, and others. Research includes materials characterization, numerical modeling, and transducer and system development for both metals and composite materials. Before joining GE, Dr. Nath worked at a small start-up company (AMTAK, Inc.) developing and implementing eddy current NDE systems for various applications. As a contractor for the NASA Langley Research Center, Dr. Nath was involved primarily in numerical modeling (finite element method and boundary element method) of electromagnetic phenomena. Dr. Nath received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Bombay University, India, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Colorado State University and Iowa State University, respectively. He holds 10 U.S. patents and is a member of ASNT and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Matthew J. O’Keefe received a B.S. degree from the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, both in metallurgical engineering. He previously worked for AT&T Microelectronics, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. He is currently a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and director of the Graduate Center for Materials Research at UMR, specializing in the deposition, characterization, and industrial use of thin films, coatings, and environmentally friendly materials and processes for corrosion, wear, and microelectronic applications. David L. Olson received a B.S. in physical metallurgy from Washington State University and a Ph.D. in materials science from Cornell University. After a short tour at Texas Instruments and postdoctoral studies at Ohio State University, Dr. Olson joined the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) in 1972 and was appointed professor of metallurgical engineering in 1978. In 1979 he was a visiting senior scientist at the Norwegian Institute of Technology. In 1981 he became head of the CSM Center for Welding Research. From 1986 to 1989 he served as vice president for research and development and dean of research. In 1997 he was named the John H. Moore Distinguished Professor of Physical Metallurgy. Dr. Olson is a professional engineer (Colorado). His research is in welding metallurgy, reactive metals, hydrogen in materials and nondestructive assessment of materials. He has authored and edited more than 17 books, 497 technical papers, and 152 archived reports, and he holds six patents. As a thesis advisor, he has completed 36 Ph.D. and 65 M.Sci. theses. He has been recognized with more than 20 international awards, including the CSM AMOCO Foundation Teaching Award (1982), Burlington Northern Foundation Faculty Achievement Award (1990), and the Dean’s Excellence Award (1994). He is a fellow of ASM and AWS and a foreign member of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine. He won the 2001 International Institute of Welding Arata Medal and Prize and was elected to Theta Tau, Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, Alpha Sigma Mu, and Blue Key. Professor Olson has chaired and served on ASM, American Welding Society, and TMS committees, and he chaired the Materials Advisory Group for the Committee on Marine Structures (NAE). He has served as a DOD focus officer on an international research project on hydrogen management of steel welds. For this effort he was awarded the 1999 DOD Technical Cooperation Program Achievement Award. He has served as a U.S. delegate to the International Ship Structure Congress, on the National Science Foundation U.S.–Argentinean Study Group on Cracking in Nuclear Fuel Rods, on the U.S.–Indian Welding Research Program (PL 480 funds), and as key reader for Metal Materials Transactions and The Welding Journal. He has been a Materials Program visitor to Ben Gurion University and a member of the U.S. Army–Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency visiting team to Russian shock research and welding research centers.

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Appendix C 59 Professor Olson is a university affiliate at Los Alamos National Laboratory and has been associated with the Albuquerque Project for 33 years. He has traveled extensively. Donald D. Palmer, Jr., received his B.S. degree in physics and his M.S. degree in materials science and engineering from Iowa State University in 1985 and 1987, respectively. He received a doctorate in materials science and engineering from Washington University in St. Louis in 2004. Beginning in 1985, Dr. Palmer worked as a research assistant at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University, focusing his research on the ultrasonic characterization of diffusion bonds. In 1987, he joined McDonnell Douglas Corporation (later Boeing) as a nondestructive evaluation specialist, supporting both production and advanced aircraft programs. During this period, he developed several microwave testing processes for quality assurance of low-observable materials and structures. He also developed an ultrasonic scattering model to support the design of stiffened composite structure. In 1997, he became the team leader of the NDE group at Boeing in St. Louis, Missouri, leading research and development activities directed at both manufacturing and support applications of NDE. This responsibility included leading the development and implementation of the Mobile Automated Scanner (MAUS) system, a portable, multimodal inspection system currently used to support production and depot maintenance processes. He was elected to the Boeing Technical Fellowship Program as an associate fellow in 2001 and a fellow in 2005. He currently leads a Boeing enterprisewide team developing NDE processes for composite materials and structures directed at both military and commercial applications. Dr. Palmer holds three patents and has more than 40 publications in technical journals and conference proceedings. He has organized and chaired sessions at a number of technical conferences and served as co-chair of the Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center Conference on NDE for Process Control. Dr. Palmer has also represented the aerospace industry on a NASA peer review committee and served on a panel focused on reducing the inspection burden at the USAF ASIP Conference. He has served on the Research Council of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) and is currently chair of the St. Louis Section of ASNT. He is also a member of ASM International. S.I. Rokhlin is a professor in the Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering at Ohio State University (OSU). He joined the faculty of OSU in 1985. His research interests are in the experimental and modeling areas of ultrasonic wave propagation; in the characterization and imaging of inhomogeneous and anisotropic materials, including composites and bonded materials; and in interphase mechanics and environmental degradation and failure. He is also active in imaging with high-resolution microfocal x-ray radiography and tomography. His more resent research interests include nanoindentation, nanomanufacturing, and molecular dynamic simulations of nanoparticle interaction. He has several patents, has authored more than 300 publications, and has given numerous presentations. Dr. Rokhlin received the Charles H. Jennings Memorial Medal Award from AWS in 1986; the Alcoa Foundation Award in 1988 and 1989; the A.F. Davis Silver Medal Award from AWS in 1991; the Faculty Research Award in 1990, 1994, and 1998 from OSU; the NASA Technical Recognition Award in 1996; and the ASNT Outstanding Paper Award in 1998. He received the 2004 Lumley Individual Research Award and the 2004 and also the 2006 Lumley Interdisciplinary Research Award, all from the Ohio State University College of Engineering, “in recognition of outstanding research accomplishments.” Dr. Rokhlin is a member of ASNT, AWS, and ASME and has served on several committees for these societies; he is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He is an associate editor of Materials Evaluation and is on the editorial boards of Research in NDE and Journal of NDE. He has served as guest editor for several special issues on NDE topics for

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60 Proceedings of a Workshop on Materials State Awareness different journals and has been the organizer of several professional meetings. He has also served on the ASNT board of directors and has been on the editorial board of the Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology. Robert Schafrik is currently the general manager of the Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aviation. He is responsible for developing advanced materials and processes used in GE's aeronautical turbine engines and their marine and industrial derivatives. He oversees materials application engineering activities supporting GE Aviation's global design engineering, manufacturing, and field-support activities. He also operates a state- of-the-art in-house laboratory for advanced materials development, characterization, and failure analysis. Dr. Schafrik also heads the GE Infrastructure Materials Council, which includes GE Energy, GE Transportation, and GE Water. Before joining GE in November 1997, he served in two concurrent positions within the National Research Council, which he joined in 1991: as director of the National Materials Advisory Board and as director of the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Under his direction, 33 final reports for studies were issued that addressed significant national issues in materials and manufacturing. Dr. Schafrik also served in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of research and development (R&D) and system acquisition capacities; he retired as a lieutenant colonel. He has a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University, an M.S. in information systems from George Mason University, an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. Kevin Smith earned his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering, with honors, from the University of Texas in 1980. Since that time he has been employed at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines, a division of United Technologies, and has advanced through a series of positions. From 1980 to 1995, he was with the Materials Engineering Nondestructive Evaluation Group of the Military Aircraft Division in West Palm Beach, ultimately supervising a team of 12 technicians and engineers. In 1995, Mr. Smith became the manager of Advanced NDE and Process Sensing, which includes responsibility for support of both commercial and military engine programs. Development, application, and implementation of advanced NDE and sensors to address design, production, and in-service needs in a cost-effective manner are the primary goals of his efforts. Mr. Smith’s experience includes all NDE modalities, with particular expertise in focal plane instrument, ultrasonic transducer, eddy current, and radiography in R&D as well as practical implementation in manufacturing and overhaul environments. He has received the Hamilton Standard President's Award for work in response to a highly visible propeller failure, the Titanium Matrix Composite Technology Consortium (TMCTECC)- Leadership Award, and the Special Award-F119 Inertia Bonded Compressor Rotor, as well as participating on numerous task forces that guided many major corporate efforts. More recently he was the recipient of the 2003 William G. Chamberlain Customer Service Award for Pratt and Whitney and in 2004 of the ASME Distinguished Engineer of the Year Award. Mr. Smith has been a strong champion for moving inspection technology from an empirical art to a science- based engineering discipline and has raised the visibility and importance of this activity significantly within the company. R. Joseph Stanley is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Missouri Institute of Science and Technology (formerly the University of Missouri-Rolla). His research interests include data fusion, signal and image processing, and pattern recognition and automation. He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society. He received B.S.E.E. and

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Appendix C 61 M.S.E.E. degrees in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. degree in computer engineering and computer science from the University of Missouri-Columbia. As a graduate student at the University of Missouri-Columbia, he worked under training grants from the National Library of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute. Upon completing his doctoral study, he served as a principal investigator for the Image Recognition Program at Systems and Electronics, Inc., in St. Louis, Missouri. Edgar A. Starke has served on the faculty of the University of Virginia since 1983, during which time he served as dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He has published more than 250 technical articles and holds three patents on aluminum alloys. Dr. Starke received the Metal Award of the Nonferrous Division of the Wire Association and has twice served as an Alpha Sigma Mu lecturer. He served as a member of NATO's Structures and Materials Panel, the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development, NASA’s Aeronautics Advisory Committee, and the Government and Public Affairs Committee of the American Society for Materials International. He served on and chaired the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council. Recently NASA awarded him the Public Service Medal, the highest honor given to a nongovernment employee. Dr. Starke also received the Innovations in Real Materials Award from the International Union of Materials Research Societies in 1998. He is a fellow in ASM International, a fellow in the Materials Society of AIME, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Starke's research interests include the mechanical behavior of materials and alloy development, with an emphasis on the relationships among primary processing, microstructure development, and mechanical properties. His current research focuses on monolithic aluminum alloys, aluminum-matrix composites, and titanium alloys. J.G. Sun is a mechanical engineer in the Energy Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory. His expertise is in the areas of nondestructive evaluation and life cycle prediction. He has captured the power of a wide range of technologies in order to assess materials stress and fatigue, including confocol microscopy, thermal imaging, and x-ray backscatter. Dr. Sun’s research is widely published in such journals as International Nanomanufacturing, Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology, and Infrared Physics and Technology. Dr. Sun has also been a presenter at multiple conferences on nondestructive evaluation and materials science. With his colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory Dr. Sun holds multiple patents for nondestructive evaluation methods and technology. R. Bruce Thompson is the director of the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, director of the Ames Laboratory Applied Nondestructive Evaluation Program, and a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at Iowa State University. He received his B.A. in physics from Rice University, his M.S. in physics from Stanford University, and his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. From 1970 to 1980, he served as a member of the technical staff and as group leader of ultrasonic applications at the Rockwell International Center before joining Iowa State University. Dr. Thompson's research interests fall in the area of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation. His specialties include the analysis and development of noncontact sensors, in particular, electromagnetic acoustic transducers; modeling the effects of measurement geometry on ultrasonic inspection; studying the uses of ultrasound to characterize a variety of microstructural and material properties such as stress, texture, porosity, grain size, and anisotropy and partially contacting interfaces; and uses of physics-based simulation tools to assist in the determination of probability of detection. Dr. Thompson is the author of six major

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62 Proceedings of a Workshop on Materials State Awareness invited review articles in the field of nondestructive evaluation, more 90 articles in archival journals, and more 323 papers in edited conference proceedings. He has been awarded 24 U.S. patents and currently serves as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation. Dr. Thompson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. John Venables received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Warwick, England, and, until his retirement he served as associate director and chief scientist at Martin Marietta Laboratories in Baltimore, Maryland. He has served on numerous study committees of the National Research Council and was a member of the Board on Army Science and Technology. He is a co-author of an entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica, “Materials Science,” and is currently a consultant for DARPA/Defense Sciences Office through Strategic Analysis, Inc. Reza Zoughi received his B.S.E.E, M.S.E.E, and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas. Currently he is the Schlumberger Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Missouri Institute of Science and Technology (formerly the University of Missouri-Rolla [UMR]). Prior to joining UMR Dr. Zoughi was with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Colorado State University (CSU), where he was a professor. He also established UMR’s Applied Microwave Nondestructive Testing Laboratory (amntl). His current areas of research include developing new nondestructive techniques (NDT) for microwave and millimeter-wave inspection and testing of materials, developing new electromagnetic probes to measure characteristic properties of material at microwave frequencies, and developing embedded modulated scattering techniques for NDT purposes, in particular, for complex composite structures. Dr. Zoughi held the position of Business Challenge Endowed Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering while at CSU. He has more than 290 journal publications, conference presentations and proceedings, technical reports, and overview articles in the fields of radar remote sensing and microwave nondestructive evaluation. He is also the author of a graduate textbook entitled Microwave Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation Principles (Kluwer, 2000), and the co-author with A. Bahr and N. Qaddoumi of a chapter on microwave techniques in an undergraduate introductory textbook entitled Nondestructive Evaluation: Theory, Techniques, and Applications, edited by P.J. Shull (Marcel and Dekker, 2002). Dr. Zoughi received the College of Engineering Abell Faculty Teaching Award in 1995. He is the 1996 recipient of the Colorado State Board of Agriculture’s Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award and was recognized as an honored researcher for 7 years by the Colorado State University Research Foundation. He has six patents, all in the field of microwave nondestructive testing and evaluation, and has given numerous invited talks on the subject of microwave nondestructive testing and evaluation. He is a senior member of IEEE and a member of Sigma Xi, Eta Kappa Nu, and the American Society for Nondestructive Testing.