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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science Biographical Sketches of Committee Members JOHN H. McELROY is Dean of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington. He was formerly a vice president for technology at Hughes Communications, Inc., joining Hughes in 1985 as Director of Special Projects in the Space and Communications Group. Prior to this he was Assistant Administrator for Satellites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he directed the nation's program in civil operational Earth observations from space. From 1966 to 1982, he served with NASA, where his last position was Deputy Director of the Goddard Space Flight Center. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Catholic University of America in 1978. He was named the Wernher von Braun Memorial Lecturer by the Smithsonian Institution for 1986. He is currently a member of the NRC's Space Studies Board, chairs its Committee on Earth Studies, and is a past member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. REPORT MENU JOHN M. HEDGEPETH is President of Digisim Corporation and until NOTICE 1983, was President of Astro Aerospace Corporation. From 1960 to 1967, he was MEMBERSHIP a manager at Martin Marietta where he rose to the position of Deputy Director of PREFACE Engineering. From 1948 to 1960, he conducted and led research for the National EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, and subsequently NASA. He received his CHAPTER 1 Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard in 1962. His research interests CHAPTER 2 include structures and aeroelasticity, magnetohydrodynamics, large space CHAPTER 3 systems, and deployable space structures. He is member of the Aeronautics and CHAPTER 4 Space Engineering Board and co-chairman of the ASEB/SSB Joint Committee on ACRONYMS Technology for Space Science and Applications. BIOGRAPHIES BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDIX A DAVID A. LANDGREBE is Professor of Electrical Engineering at Purdue APPENDIX B University from which he received his Ph.D. in 1962. He has held positions at the APPENDIX C Bell Telephone Laboratories, Interstate Electronics Corporation and the Douglas APPENDIX D Aircraft Company. He is the author of numerous scientific publications in the APPENDIX E fields of data representation, analysis and remote sensing and is a member of the editorial board of the journal "Remote Sensing and Environment. Dr. Landgrebe was awarded the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 1973 for his work in the field of machine analysis methods for remotely-sensed Earth resources data. He is member of the Space Studies Board and co-chairman of file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (1 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]

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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) the ASEB/SSB Joint Committee on Technology for Space Science and Applications. THEODORE M. ALBERT retired from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1989 and is currently a consultant. While at the USGS, Mr. Albert's responsibilities included the development of databases, evaluation of data storage techniques, and the establishment of federal Earth science data standards. Prior to joining the USGS in 1978, he was Director of the Office of Environmental Information Systems for the Department of Energy and held positions with Westinghouse Electric and a technical consulting firm. Mr. Alberts received his M.S. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1965, and a B.A. in Mathematics from the University of South Florida. JEFFREY R. ALBERTS is Professor of Psychology and Associate Dean of the Office of Research and the University Graduate School at Indiana University. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Princeton University in 1974. His research interests include developmental psychobiology, animal behavior, and the environmental requirements of research animals. He is the Indiana University Co-Director of the Indiana Space Grant Consortium which also involves Purdue and Notre Dame Universities. In 1983, he was a principal investigator in the Soviet-U.S. Cosmos-1514 Biosatellite mission. JAMES G. ANDERSON is Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in Physics/Astrogeophysics from the University of Colorado in 1970. Dr. Anderson was Mission Scientist for the NASA Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment II; the results of his research have significantly contributed to understanding the effect of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the Earth's atmosphere and have been used in the development of the international protocols controlling the use of CFCs. Dr. Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. WILLIAM V. BOYNTON is a professor in the Department of Planetary Sciences at the University of Arizona. He received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in Physical Chemistry. His research interests include planetary surface composition, meteorites, comets, and trace element condensation from the solar nebula. He is a team leader and principal investigator for the Mars Observer mission, a co-investigator for the Cassini mission to the outer solar system, and has served on several advisory groups and committees for NASA and the NRC. WILLIAM M. BURNETT is Senior Vice President for Research and Development Management for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago, Illinois where he has developed a project appraisal methodology used to prioritize their research and development programs. Mr. Burnett began his career as a physicist for the Naval Ordnance Station in 1966 and served in various positions with responsibility for R&D efforts on rocket and gun propulsion systems. He received an M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Norwich University in 1972, and a B.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1965. Mr. Burnett has served as a past member of NRC Energy Engineering Board Review Panels. file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (2 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]

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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) SAM R. CORIELL is a physical chemist who has performed research in the Metallurgy Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for nearly 30 years. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Ohio State University in 1961. His research interests include crystal growth, solidification, heat flow, diffusion, and fluid mechanics. Dr. Coriell has been active in the microgravity sciences research community, chairing the 1989 Gordon Research Conference on Gravitational Effects in Materials and Processes, and serving on NASA advisory boards in this area. ANDREA K. DUPREE is a senior astrophysicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Dupree received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1968, and has been an investigator on many space-based and ground-based astronomical research projects. Her research interests include solar and stellar atmospheres, the interstellar medium, and high resolution spectroscopy. From 1980-1987, Dr. Dupree was Associate Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Head of the Solar and Stellar Physics Division. Dr. Dupree has served two terms on the NRC's Space Studies Board, is a former vice president of the American Astronomical Society, and has served on numerous other boards and committees for groups including the NRC, NASA, and the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). ANTHONY W. ENGLAND is presently a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan. He was a NASA scientist-astronaut from 1967 to 1972; performed research in Antarctica, and was Deputy Chief of the Office of Geochemistry and Geophysics during his 1972-1979 affiliation with the U.S. Geological Survey; and was a senior scientist and Space Shuttle astronaut with NASA from 1979 to 1988. Dr. England was a mission specialist on Spacelab 2 in 1985 which included research on solar, plasma, and atmospheric physics. He received his Ph.D. in Geophysics in 1970 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. PAUL D. FELDMAN is a professor of physics and astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University, where he has taught since 1967. Dr. Feldman received his Ph.D. in atomic physics from Columbia University in 1964 and was a research associate at the Naval Research Laboratory from 1965-1967. His research interests include the atmospheres of Earth and the planets and ultraviolet astronomy. He was a principal investigator on the 1990 ASTRO-1 Space Shuttle mission, is a trustee of the University Space Research Association and a former member of the NRC's Committee on Planetary Exploration. ROBERT E. FISCHELL is currently a principal staff physicist at The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and President of MedInTec, Inc. Mr. Fischell has been associated with the APL since 1959 and was formerly Chief Engineer and Chief of Technology Transfer for its space department. Mr. Fischell is also affiliated with both the Johns Hopkins and Yale University Schools of Medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, has been an innovator in spacecraft and biomedical engineering for over 30 years and received numerous awards for his inventions and other file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (3 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]

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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) engineering achievements. He received his M.S. degree in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1953, and a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Duke University in 1951. JAMES R. FRENCH is currently a space systems engineering consultant. Mr. French graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1958 with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. He worked as an engineer or manager on a variety of major space projects from 1958 to 1987, starting as a development engineer at Rocketdyne for the F-1 and J-2 (Saturn) engines, and from 1967 to 1986 working as an engineer, manager, and study leader at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he worked on the Mariner, Viking, Voyager, and SP-100 programs. After leaving JPL he went to the American Rocket Company where he was Vice President for Engineering. Mr. French is co-author, with Dr. Michael Griffin, of an authoritative text on space systems engineering, Space Vehicle Design. HAROLD J. GUY is a medical doctor and associate clinical professor at the University of California School of Medicine, with which he has been affiliated since 1982. He received his graduate degree in Medicine from Otago University in New Zealand in 1963. After completing his internship he served as a flight surgeon and medical officer with the Royal New Zealand Air Force in New Zealand and Vietnam. His research interests are in pulmonary function in microgravity. He was largely responsible for the definition and development of the lung function test system, as co-investigator on the 1991 Space Shuttle Mission, STS-40, Spacelab Life Sciences 1. DAVID J. McCOMAS is the Section Leader for Space Plasma and Planetary Physics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he has been on staff since 1980. Dr. McComas received his Ph.D. in Geophysics and Space Physics from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1986. He is the principal investigator for the series of 12 Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments at geosynchronous orbit and leads the Los Alamos involvement in space plasma instruments for NASA missions. He presently serves on the NRC Committee on Solar Terrestrial Research and NASA's Inner Magnetospheric Imager study team. His research interests range from space instrument design and development to solar wind, magnetospheric, cometary and planetary physics. FRANK B. McDONALD is currently a senior research scientist at the Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland. He has spent nearly 30 years of his career with NASA-at Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA Headquarters, and was NASA's Chief Scientist from 1982 to 1987. During his service at Goddard he contributed to, and managed, the design and the development of many scientific instruments and satellites. His research interests include the study of galactic and solar cosmic rays, and astrophysics in general. Dr. McDonald received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1955 and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. DUANE T. McRUER is President of Systems Technology, Inc., an engineering company that has worked with many government agencies including file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (4 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]

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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) NASA, the Department of Defense, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Transportation, and the Consumer Product Safety Administration. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the California Institute of Technology, and research interests range from control systems engineering to the dynamics of human operations. He is Chairman of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a member. of the NASA Advisory Council. Mr. McRuer is currently on leave from Systems Technology, Inc., and is the J.C. Hunsaker Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. FRANKLIN K. MOORE is Joseph C. Ford Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests include thermal engineering, boundary layer theory, propulsion, power systems heat rejection, and thermal pollution. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautical engineering from Cornell in 1949, worked for the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) from 1949 to 1955 and has twice served as a visiting senior scientist at NASA Headquarters during the 1980s. Dr. Moore is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and past member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. RICHARD K. MOORE is Black and Veatch Professor of Electrical Engineering and Director of the Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas. He received a Ph.D. from Cornell University in Electrical Engineering in 1951 and has held positions at RCA Victor, Washington University, and Cornell University. His research interests include submarine, tropospheric, and ionospheric wave propagation, radar systems, and the application of radar and radio wave propagation to Earth sciences. Dr. Moore is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a former member of the Space Studies Board. SIMON OSTRACH is W. J. Austin Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He received a Ph.D. degree in Applied Mathematics in 1950. He was an aeronautical research scientist with NACA from 1944-1947 and Chief of its Fluid Physics Branch from 1950-1960. His research interests include convection, reduced-gravity phenomena, and materials processing. He was a principal investigator for a scientific experiment flown in space on board the Space Shuttle's USML-1 mission in June-July 1992. He is a member and Home Secretary of the National Academy of Engineering, and member of the Space Studies Board's Committee on Microgravity Research and has served widely on the boards of professional societies and journals. KUMAR RAMOHALLI is a professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering of the University of Arizona where he currently directs programs in nine engineering departments for the University's NASA Space Engineering Research Center. Dr. Ramohalli received his Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971. His research interests in space technologies include propulsion, combustion, acoustics, composite materials, energy storage, and techniques for the elimination of orbiting debris. He is a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and has held positions at the file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (5 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]

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Improving NASA's Technology for Space Science (Biographical Sketches of Committee Members) California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ALBERT R. SCHALLENMULLER is Chief Engineer and Vice President, Program Development, Civil Space and Communications Company of Main Marietta Astronautics Group. He has been with Martin Marietta since 1963, and has served as director on a variety of programs since 1979. Prior to this he was assigned to the Viking program from inception to completion, working on software, data systems, science operations, and was the mission control director on the Viking flight team. Early in his career he was assigned to the Titan III Dynasoar program, and was responsible for training astronauts in safety. He is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. GEORGE F. SMITH spent 35 years at the Hughes Research Laboratories, first as a research scientist, and then in a leadership role. When he retired in 1987, he was Senior Vice President of Hughes Aircraft Company, and had been Director of the Laboratories since 1969. Under his leadership, the Hughes Laboratory made significant contributions to electronics, lasers, electro- optics, artificial intelligence, and was able to successfully transfer new technologies into operational devices for military and space systems. He received a Ph.D. in Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1952. From 1946- 1948 Dr. Smith was one of a dozen founding members of Engineering Research Associates, which later became the Univac division of Sperry. JOHN W. TOWNSEND retired in 1990 after 3 years as Director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center after a total of 34 years in Federal service. He received B.A., M.A., and Sc.D. (Hon) degrees from Williams College. He began his career at the Naval Research Laboratory in 1949 as a physicist instrumenting V-2, Viking and Aerobee sounding rockets for upper air research, and joined NASA at its inception in 1958. In 1970 he became the Associate Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He left the government in 1977 and joined Fairchild Industries for ten years where he held positions including Executive Vice President and President of the Fairchild Space Company. Dr. Townsend is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. WILLIAM P. WIESMANN is Director of the Division of Surgery for Combat Trauma and Casualty Research at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Colonel Wiesmann received his M.D. from Washington University in 1972. His research interests include immunology, nephrology, and space biology. He is the Project Manager and Senior Principal Investigator for the Department of Defense Space Tissue Loss Project, an experiment utilizing a novel piece of flight hardware to culture bone and muscle cells on orbit in the Space Shuttle. file:///C|/SSB_old_web/nasatechbios.htm (6 of 7) [6/18/2004 11:39:24 AM]