APPENDIX B
LIST OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

John L. Anderson (Chair), Illinois Institute of Technology

John L. Anderson (NAE) is the president of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Previously, Dr. Anderson served as provost, university vice president, and professor of chemical engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He served on the faculty of Cornell University for 5 years before joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in 1976, where he served until 2004. Dr. Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has chaired the NAE Chemical Engineering section. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is the author of more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Delaware and his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. His research subjects include membrane science, colloid science, fluid dynamics, and biotransport.


Alan Berman, Independent Consultant

Alan Berman is an independent consultant whose current clients include the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University, the Department of Energy's Jefferson Laboratory, the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, the Domestic Nuclear Defense Organization, and the Customs and Boarder Patrol. Dr. Berman's expertise includes Navy research and development investments, space operations capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs. Dr. Berman served as dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where he was responsible for the graduate programs in physical oceanography, marine biology, geology, geophysics, applied ocean science, and underwater acoustics; and as director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he administered broad programs in basic and applied research.


Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University

Charles A. Bouman is professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. His research focuses on the use of statistical image models, multiscale techniques, and fast algorithms in applications that include medical and electronic imaging. Dr. Bouman received his PhD in electrical engineering from Princeton University and his MS from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Society for Imaging Science and Technology, and the SPIE professional society.



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APPENDIX B LIST OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS John L. Anderson (Chair), Illinois Institute of Technology John L. Anderson (NAE) is the president of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Previously, Dr. Anderson served as provost, university vice president, and professor of chemical engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He served on the faculty of Cornell University for 5 years before joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in 1976, where he served until 2004. Dr. Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has chaired the NAE Chemical Engineering section. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is the author of more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Delaware and his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. His research subjects include membrane science, colloid science, fluid dynamics, and biotransport. Alan Berman, Independent Consultant Alan Berman is an independent consultant whose current clients include the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University, the Department of Energy's Jefferson Laboratory, the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, the Domestic Nuclear Defense Organization, and the Customs and Boarder Patrol. Dr. Berman's expertise includes Navy research and development investments, space operations capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs. Dr. Berman served as dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where he was responsible for the graduate programs in physical oceanography, marine biology, geology, geophysics, applied ocean science, and underwater acoustics; and as director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he administered broad programs in basic and applied research. Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University Charles A. Bouman is professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. His research focuses on the use of statistical image models, multiscale techniques, and fast algorithms in applications that include medical and electronic imaging. Dr. Bouman received his PhD in electrical engineering from Princeton University and his MS from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Society for Imaging Science and Technology, and the SPIE professional society. 60

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Martha Crenshaw, Stanford University Martha Crenshaw is a Senior Fellow in the Center for International Security and Cooperation at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and professor of political science by courtesy at Stanford University. She taught at Wesleyan University in Connecticut from 1974 to 2007. She chairs the American Political Science Association Task Force on Political Violence and Terrorism. She was a Guggenheim Fellow in 2005. She is also a lead investigator at the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), a Center of Excellence of the Department of Homeland Security based at the University of Maryland. Her recent publications include “Terrorism and Global Security”, in an edited volume, Leashing the Dogs of War: Conflict Management in a Divided World (United States Institute of Peace Press, 2007); and “Explaining Suicide Terrorism: A Review Essay”, in Security Studies (Spring 2007). Mary Lou Fultz, University of Maryland Mary Lou Fultz is an independent consultant and former assistant director of the US Postal Service Crime Laboratory. Dr. Fultz was chief of the Forensic Science Laboratory for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. She received her PhD in chemistry from the University of Maryland. William J. Hurley, Institute for Defense Analyses William J. Hurley is assistant director of the System Evaluation Division at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). Before going to IDA in 1985, he was with the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Hurley has directed over 30 studies sponsored principally by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Navy. His work has emphasized force planning, analytic methods, and advanced technologies. Since 2000, he has focused on urban conflict and irregular warfare. In addition to his research responsibilities, from 1991 to 1998 Dr. Hurley was the associate director and then director of the Defense Science Study Group, a program of education and study that introduces young professors of science and engineering to national-security systems, organizations, and current issues. Dr. Hurley's academic background is in mathematical physics. He received a BS in physics from Boston College and a PhD in physics from the University of Rochester (1971) and has held research positions at Syracuse University and the University of Texas. Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University Anil K. Jain is a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. He received his BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur and his MS and PhD from Ohio State University. His research interests include statistical-pattern recognition, computer vision, and biometric authentication. He received awards for best papers in 1987 and 1991 from the Pattern Recognition Society. He also received the 1996 IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks Best Paper Award. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Association for Pattern Recognition. He has received Fulbright, Guggenheim, and Humboldt awards. Holder of six patents in fingerprint-matching, he is the author of a number of books, including Handbook of Face 61

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Recognition and Handbook of Fingerprint Recognition. He is a member of the National Research Council study team on Whither Biometrics?. Edward H. Kaplan, Yale School of Management Edward H. Kaplan (NAE, IOM) is the William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Management Sciences, professor of public health, and professor of engineering at Yale University. He received his bachelor's degree from McGill University and proceeded to graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he completed three master’s degrees—in operations research, city planning, and statistics—and a doctorate in urban studies. He has recently developed novel methods for quantitatively evaluating the tactical prevention of suicide bombings, including the operational effectiveness of suicide-bomber–detector schemes. Dr. Kaplan is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering. Andrew W. Moore, Google Andrew Moore is director of one of Google's newest engineering offices, on Carnegie Mellon's campus in Pittsburgh, PA. Before joining Google, he was a professor of robotics and computer science at the School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University. His main research interest is data mining: statistical algorithms for finding the potentially useful and statistically meaningful patterns in large masses of data. His research group, The Auton Lab, has devised several ways of performing large statistical operations efficiently, in several cases advancing the state of the art by several orders of magnitude. In 2003, he assisted in briefing President Bush on data-mining approaches for early warning of biologic attacks. He is on the advisory boards of several commercial and government organizations. Jimmie C. Oxley, University of Rhode Island Jimmie C. Oxley is professor of chemistry at the University of Rhode Island and co-director of the Forensic Science Partnership. After receiving her PhD from the University of British Columbia, Dr. Oxley joined the faculty of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, where she founded a PhD program in explosives and created the thermal-hazards research group. Dr. Oxley's laboratory specializes in the study of energetic materials. Most of the studies examine how and how fast those materials decompose; the goal is to understand their stability so that they may be handled safely. She received her BS from the University of California, San Diego (1971); her MS from California State University, Northridge; and her PhD from the University of British Columbia (1983). Amy Sands, Monterey Institute of International Studies Amy Sands is the provost and academic vice president of the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Before becoming provost, she held two other positions at the institute. Most recently, she served for 2.5 years as the dean of the Graduate School of International Policy Studies, which is dedicated to providing professional graduate international education to prepare students for careers in a global workplace. Earlier, she was the deputy director of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies for 7 years. Her responsibilities involved strategic oversight and daily management of the center’s 62

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projects and activities. From August 1994 to June 1996, she was assistant director of the Intelligence, Verification, and Information Management Bureau at the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA). Before joining ACDA, she led the Proliferation Assessments Section of Z Division (Intelligence) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and was country risk manager of New England Merchants Bank. On leaving the government, Dr. Sands received ACDA's Distinguished Honor Award and the On- Site Inspection Agency's Exceptional Civilian Service Medal. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. William C. Trogler, University of California, San Diego William C. Trogler is professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego. His current research focuses on inorganic chemistry applied to problems of technologic interest. Dr. Trogler's research group is exploring the use of photoluminescent conjugated silafluorene and silole polymers as sensors for detecting explosives and of chemoresponsive transistors of metal phthalocyanines as electronic chemical sensors for organic vapors and peroxides. He is also engaged in the synthesis of uniform hollow nanospheres of silica and titania for biomedical applications, such as drug and gene delivery in cancer therapy. He received his BA and MA in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in 1974 and his PhD in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1977. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Strategic Advisory Board for RedXDefense. Jonathan Young, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Jonathan Young is head of the Safety and Risk Analysis Group of the Environmental Technology Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He has over 40 years of experience in systems and safety engineering, safety analysis, probabilistic safety assessment, and system-security activities in the aerospace and nuclear industries. He is principal instructor and course developer for numerous probabilistic safety-assessment courses in the United States and abroad. Mr. Young received his BA in mathematics from Lincoln University. 63