Study Committee Biographical Information

Jerry R. Schubel, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California, and directs the aquarium’s Marine Conservation Research Institute. He was president and chief executive officer of the New England Aquarium in Boston from 1994 to 2001 and dean and director of the Marine Sciences Research Center at the State University of New York at Stony Brook from 1974 to 1994. Under his leadership, the center became known for excellence in fundamental research in coastal oceanography and for the development of innovative strategies allowing humans to live in harmony with their coastal environments. In 2005, an endowed Jerry R. Schubel graduate fellowship was created by the center in recognition of Dr. Schubel’s contributions to the evolution of the institution. Dr. Schubel has published more than 200 scientific papers in academic journals and has written extensively for general audiences. He chairs the Ocean Research and Resources Advisory Panel and is a member of the Science Advisory Team for the California Ocean Protection Council. He is past chair of the National Sea Grant Review Panel and has served on the National Science Foundation’s Education and Human Resources Advisory Council and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. In 1998, Dr. Schubel was awarded an honorary DSc degree by the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, and in 2004 he was named a National Associate of the National Academies. He is a former chair and vice chair and a current member of the Marine Board, and he chaired the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Seaway: Options to Eliminate Introduction of



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 193
Study Committee Biographical Information Jerry R. Schubel, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California, and directs the aquarium’s Marine Conservation Research Institute. He was presi- dent and chief executive officer of the New England Aquarium in Boston from 1994 to 2001 and dean and director of the Marine Sci- ences Research Center at the State University of New York at Stony Brook from 1974 to 1994. Under his leadership, the center became known for excellence in fundamental research in coastal oceanogra- phy and for the development of innovative strategies allowing humans to live in harmony with their coastal environments. In 2005, an endowed Jerry R. Schubel graduate fellowship was created by the center in recognition of Dr. Schubel’s contributions to the evolution of the institution. Dr. Schubel has published more than 200 scientific papers in academic journals and has written ex- tensively for general audiences. He chairs the Ocean Research and Resources Advisory Panel and is a member of the Science Advisory Team for the California Ocean Protection Council. He is past chair of the National Sea Grant Review Panel and has served on the National Science Foundation’s Education and Human Resources Advisory Council and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board. In 1998, Dr. Schubel was awarded an hon- orary DSc degree by the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, and in 2004 he was named a National Associate of the National Acade- mies. He is a former chair and vice chair and a current member of the Marine Board, and he chaired the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Seaway: Options to Eliminate Introduction of 193

OCR for page 193
1 94 Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species Nonindigenous Species into the Great Lakes. Dr. Schubel earned a BS in physics and mathematics from Alma College, Michigan, a master’s degree from Harvard University, and a PhD in oceanography from the Johns Hopkins University. Richard M. Anderson is assistant professor of environmental sys- tems analysis at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environ- ment and Earth Sciences. He previously held visiting scientist and research associate positions at the Johns Hopkins University Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, was a research associate with the National Weather Service, and worked as a nuclear safety analyst for Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Dr. Anderson recently spent a year with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Office of Risk Assessment and Cost–Benefit Analysis on a fellowship from the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. His research interests focus on environmental sys- tems analysis, decision analysis, and watershed management. He is particularly interested in bringing together many types of scientific data and incorporating decision-making models to enable environ- mental resource managers to make decisions that balance the com- peting interests of different stakeholders. His work on protecting the walleye fish population in Lake Erie has sought to apply these con- cepts. Dr. Anderson earned a BS in engineering mechanics, an MS in mechanical engineering, and a PhD in geography and environ- mental engineering, all from the Johns Hopkins University. Stephen W. Fuller is Regents Professor in the Department of Agri- cultural Economics at Texas A&M University, where he has been a faculty member since 1974. His responsibilities include develop- ment of an agricultural marketing program with emphasis on transportation research. Dr. Fuller’s principal research interests are agricultural transportation, marketing, and international trade. His recent publications have addressed grain transportation on the upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers and the effects of improving transportation infrastructure on competitiveness in world grain markets. Dr. Fuller has received awards from the Transportation Research Forum for outstanding papers in rural transportation,

OCR for page 193
Study Committee Biographical Information 195 and in 2002 he received the Southern Agricultural Economics Asso- ciation lifetime achievement award. He has served on two National Research Council (NRC) study committees, the Committee on Freight Transportation Needs for the 21st Century and the Com- mittee to Review the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Restructured Study of the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Waterways. He recently served on an expert panel charged with reviewing a report prepared for the Joyce Foundation on transportation cost increases that would result from a cessation of ocean vessel shipping in the Great Lakes. Dr. Fuller earned a BS and an MS in agricultural economics and a PhD in economics, all from Kansas State University. Trevor D. Heaver is professor emeritus in the Operations and Logistics Division of the Sauder School of Business at the Univer- sity of British Columbia (UBC). He is also a visiting professor at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. Dr. Heaver held a variety of positions at UBC between 1960 and 1997, including UPS Founda- tion Professor of Transportation, Director of the Center for Trans- portation Studies, and Chair of the Transportation and Logistics Division in the Faculty of Commerce. His research interests focus on maritime and international logistics, maritime policy, and transportation economics, and his publications include 12 books and monographs and more than 100 journal articles. Dr. Heaver is a former president of the World Conference on Transportation Research Society and of the International Association of Maritime Economists. He has served on a number of advisory committees addressing transportation, logistics, and trade issues, including the Canadian Federal Transportation Services Sectoral Advisory Group on International Trade and the Multimodal Council of the Transportation Association of Canada. He has appeared before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Transport on a num- ber of occasions as well as before the Canadian Transport Com- mission. Dr. Heaver recently authored two papers commissioned by the Canada Transportation Act Review Panel. He also provided economic input for a study for the International Joint Commis- sion on the effects of different water level and flow conditions on

OCR for page 193
1 96 Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species vessel operations in the Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River section of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway system. Dr. Heaver received a BA from Oxford University, England, and a PhD from Indiana University. Geoffrey J. D. Hewings is professor in the Departments of Geog- raphy, Economics, and Urban and Regional Planning and director of the Regional Economics Applications Laboratory (REAL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. REAL is a joint ven- ture between the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the Uni- versity of Illinois. His major research interests lie in the field of urban and regional economic analysis with a focus on the design, implementation, and application of regional economic models for use in policy formation and analysis. In addition to continuing development of regional econometric input–output models for a number of U.S. states and metropolitan areas, he is engaged in modeling projects in Brazil, Argentina, Austria, Colombia, Japan, and Indonesia. His recent work on the Midwest regional economy has focused on the estimation of interstate trade flows as a prelude to the construction of a Midwest impact and forecasting model that is linked with a transportation network model. Dr. Hewings has published nine books and more than 100 articles. In 2003, he received the Walter Isard Award for distinguished scholarly achievements in the field of regional science and an honorary doctorate from the University of Bourgogne, France. In 1995, the Regional Science Association International established the Geoffrey J. D. Hewings Junior Scholar Award, which is awarded annually to an exceptional scholar less than 10 years from com- pletion of his or her PhD. Dr. Hewings serves on the Board of Directors of the Environmental Law and Policy Center in Chicago and on the Technical Advisory Committee of the Northeastern Illi- nois Planning Commission. He earned a BA from the University of Birmingham, England, and an MA and a PhD from the Univer- sity of Washington, Seattle. Philip T. Jenkins is president of Philip T. Jenkins and Associates, Ltd., a marine consulting and management services company in

OCR for page 193
Study Committee Biographical Information 197 Fonthill, Ontario. Captain Jenkins has been active in the Great Lakes marine community in both the public and private sectors for more than 25 years. As chief, Marine Services, for the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority in the early 1980s, he was responsible for the establishment and administration of regulations, procedures, and standards for safe ship operation through the international water- way; the conduct of inspections and accident investigations; and liaison with the marine industry in North America and overseas. Before forming his own consulting company in 1989, Captain Jenkins was vice president, Fleet Operations, for Misener Shipping, Ltd., in St. Catherines, Ontario. In that position he was responsi- ble for the operation and technical management of the company’s Canadian-flag inland and deep-sea bulk carriers, as well as its foreign-flag bulk carriers. In recent years, Captain Jenkins has worked on a number of projects to monitor ballast water manage- ment and develop practical alternatives to ballast water exchange. He was a member of the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Seaway: Options to Eliminate Introduction of Nonindigenous Species into the Great Lakes. Captain Jenkins is a member of the Association of Marine Arbitrators of Canada and the Company of Master Mariners of Canada, as well as the Nautical Institute and the Royal Institute of Navigation in London. He holds Master Foreign Going certification from both Canada and the United Kingdom. Hugh J. MacIsaac is professor of biology and Department of Fish- eries and Oceans Invasion Biology Research Chair at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Ontario. He is also director of the Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species Network. His research focuses on biological invasions and aquatic community ecology, with particular emphasis on the Great Lakes, and uses genetic probes, mathematical modeling, and field studies to explore the importance of invasion vectors. Because many of the invasive species found in the Great Lakes come from Europe, Dr. MacIsaac’s research includes collaborative investigations with researchers working on the Baltic, North, Black, and Caspian Seas. He has published more than 80 refereed papers on topics related to biological invasions and is an associate editor of the journals

OCR for page 193
1 98 Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species Aquatic Ecosystem Health and Management and Diversity and Distributions. Dr. MacIsaac received the University of Windsor Research Excellence Award in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2006 and the Premier’s Research Excellence Award in 2000. He is a member of the Great Lakes Invasive Species Task Force and the International Joint Commission’s Science Advisory Committee. He was also a member of the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Seaway: Options to Eliminate Introduction of Nonindigenous Species into the Great Lakes. Dr. MacIsaac earned a BSc from the University of Windsor, an MSc from the University of Toronto, and a PhD from Dartmouth College. Steven W. Popper is a senior economist with the Rand Corpora- tion and professor of science and technology policy in the Rand Graduate School. From 1996 to 2001, he was associate director of Rand’s Science and Technology Policy Institute, where his work provided research and analytic support to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and other agencies of the execu- tive branch. His recent projects include work on technical barriers to international trade, critical technologies, national innovation systems, and federal R&D portfolio decision making. Dr. Popper is currently active in projects of the new Rand Pardee Center for the Longer-Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condi- tion. He was coauthor of the flagship study Shaping the Next Hun- dred Years, which provides a new methodological framework for considering problems raised by future uncertainty. Dr. Popper has conducted research and has served as consultant to several governments and multilateral international organizations, such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, on issues of regional economic development, industrial restruc- turing, and technology planning. Before joining Rand, he worked as a researcher in physical chemistry and enzymology; as country account officer for Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, and Yugoslavia at Bank of America; and as consultant to the World Bank on issues of industrial restructuring in East Europe. Dr. Popper is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a charter member of the Pacific Council on Interna-

OCR for page 193
Study Committee Biographical Information 199 tional Policy. He earned a BS in biochemistry from the Univer- sity of Minnesota and a PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Frank H. Quinn is a consulting research hydrologist. In 2001, he retired from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- tion’s (NOAA’s) Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where his positions included senior research hydrologist and head of the Physical Sciences Division. In addition to conducting his own research on Great Lakes hydrology, hydraulics, and climate, Dr. Quinn worked with oceanographers, ecologists, biologists, and atmospheric scientists on a variety of multidisciplinary Great Lakes environmental proj- ects. Before joining NOAA’s Lake Survey Center (later GLERL) in 1970, he was a hydraulic engineer with the Lake Survey District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Detroit. Dr. Quinn has been actively involved in Great Lakes water resource issues and lake level research for more than 40 years and has authored more than 100 publications. He has also lectured extensively on Great Lakes water quantity issues. He is a former president of the International Association for Great Lakes Research and has served on several boards, task forces, and committees of the International Joint Commission, the Great Lakes Commission, and other Great Lakes organizations. He was the U.S. chair of the binational program to assess potential impacts of climate change on the Great Lakes– St. Lawrence basin. In 1987, Dr. Quinn was awarded the U.S. Department of Commerce Silver Medal for outstanding contribu- tions toward the management of natural resources. Other honors include the Department of the Army Commanders Award for Pub- lic Service in 2001 and the Great Lakes Commission Outstanding Service Award, also in 2001. Dr. Quinn earned a BS and an MS in civil engineering from Wayne State University and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Michigan. Thomas D. Waite is F. W. Olin Professor of Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne. He was previously professor of environmental

OCR for page 193
2 00 Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species engineering and associate dean of research and graduate studies at the University of Miami. From 2002 to 2004, he also served as pro- gram director of environmental engineering and technology in the Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Systems at the National Science Foundation in Arlington, Virginia. His research interests include disinfection of wastewater effluents and sludge and the use of innovative treatments for the remediation of haz- ardous wastes. Much of his recent work has focused on technologies for treating ships’ ballast water. Dr. Waite has served as a techni- cal expert to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) for establishing global ballast water standards and as a consultant to the U.S. Coast Guard and Carnival Cruise Lines on ballast water treatment. In 1999, while on sabbatical at the Nanyang Techno- logical University in Singapore, he was a member of the Singapore delegation to the IMO Ballast Water Working Group. He advised NOAA on the emergency treatment of ballast water during the grounding of the MS Igloo Moon off the Florida Keys in 1996. Dr. Waite has published three books and more than 50 refereed papers in the technical literature. He served on the NRC committees on ships’ ballast operations and on shipboard pollution control and was a member of the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Sea- way: Options to Eliminate Introduction of Nonindigenous Species into the Great Lakes. Dr. Waite earned a BS and an MS in civil engineering from Northeastern University and an MS and a PhD from Harvard University. M. Gordon (Reds) Wolman is the B. Howell Griswold Professor of Geography and International Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University, where he has been a faculty member since 1958. His research interests include environmental policy; the interaction of human activities and natural processes in altering the environment; and surficial earth processes with emphasis on erosion, sedimen- tation, and landform evolution. His recent publications address a variety of topics in environmental policy, including human and ecosystem health, water quality management, and the application of systems analysis in natural resources management. Dr. Wolman was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988 and to the

OCR for page 193
Study Committee Biographical Information 201 National Academy of Engineering in 2002. He received the National Council for Science and the Environment’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004, the Abel Wolman Award from the Chesapeake Water Environment Federation in 2003, and the Horton Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2000. His other awards include the Penrose Medal from the Geological Society of Amer- ica and the John Wesley Powell Award from the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Wolman has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Phase 1 Committee on the St. Lawrence Seaway: Options to Eliminate Introduction of Nonindigenous Species into the Great Lakes. He is a National Associate of the National Academies and a former member of the Transportation Research Board’s Executive Committee. He earned a BA from the Johns Hopkins University and an MA and a PhD from Harvard University, all in geology. Joy B. Zedler is the Aldo Leopold Professor of Restoration Ecol- ogy at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Arboretum and Botany Department. She was professor of biology at San Diego State University from 1980 to 1998. Her research interests include wetland ecology, the structure and functioning of wetlands, restoration ecology, interactions of native and exotic species, and the use of scientific information in the management of wetlands. Her numerous publications address various topics in wetland ecology. They include a book chapter on prospects for the in- tegrity of aquatic ecosystems and articles on the causes and con- sequences of invasive plants in wetlands and on the need for a regional restoration strategy for coastal mitigation in Southern California. Dr. Zedler is a member of the Boards of Trustees of Environmental Defense (formerly the Environmental Defense Fund) and the Wisconsin Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and served on the Nature Conservancy Governing Board from 1995 to 2004. She has received a variety of awards for her teaching, research, and conservation activities, including the first award for achievements in regional wetland conservation from the Southern California Wetlands Recovery Project in 2000 and the National Wetlands Award for Science Research from the Environmental

OCR for page 193
2 02 Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species Law Institute and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1997. Dr. Zedler has served on several NRC committees and chaired the Committee on Wetland Mitigation; she is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board. She earned a BS in biology from Augustana College and an MS and a PhD, both in botany, from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Ann P. Zimmerman is professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Toronto and former director of the Koffler Scientific Reserve at Jokers Hill, a university research station. She teaches courses in limnology, lake ecosystem conservation, and global change ecology. She was the founding director of the uni- versity’s Division of the Environment and served as cochair of the university’s Environmental Protection Advisory Committee for 10 years. Her research focuses on freshwater ecosystems, and she is involved in cooperative efforts with ecologists both inside and outside the university in efforts to develop practically oriented, holistic models of lake ecosystems that might prove useful in both rehabilitation and efforts to conserve aquatic community biodiver- sity. Dr. Zimmerman is also interested in participatory research, cross-cultural technology transfer, and application of appropriate technology, with particular reference to the Nishnawbe-Aski of northwestern Ontario and other Canadian First Nations. Her involvement in a large lake acidification survey project of Ontario lakes and an effort to provide equitable, appropriate technologies for water supply and wastewater treatment in remote locations afforded her firsthand experience of the politics attendant to envi- ronmental issues. Dr. Zimmerman earned a BA in zoology from Ohio Wesleyan University and a PhD in biogeochemistry from the University of Georgia.