Part IV
Assessing Systematically

In this part, we present our ideas about how to design, develop, and implement systems of assessment. We strongly believe that assessment of young children should be an integral part of a larger system of early childhood development services, and should be designed to be coherent with the objectives and approaches the system embraces and should be complementary to the other components of the system. We realize that today such comprehensive systems to support children’s development are more commonly aspirations than realities, but we see them as an important goal that should be pursued. Thus in Chapter 10 we present our vision of an ideal early childhood services system, its components and infrastructure, and describe the roles that assessments play in such a system. In Chapter 11, we present our guidelines for developing and implementing assessments within such a system.



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OCR for page 299
Part IV Assessing Systematically I n this part, we present our ideas about how to design, develop, and implement systems of assessment. We strongly believe that assessment of young children should be an integral part of a larger system of early childhood development services, and should be designed to be coherent with the objectives and approaches the system embraces and should be complementary to the other components of the system. We realize that today such comprehensive systems to support children’s development are more commonly aspirations than realities, but we see them as an important goal that should be pursued. Thus in Chapter 10 we present our vision of an ideal early childhood services system, its components and infrastructure, and describe the roles that assessments play in such a system. In Chapter 11, we present our guidelines for developing and implementing assessments within such a system. 

OCR for page 299