Appendix D
Sources of Detailed Information on Test and Assessment Instruments

For specific information on the features and content of instruments for use with infants and young children, the committee refers the reader to the following sources. They provide information on the construct measured, the content of the instrument, the time to administer, how the instrument is administered (e.g., caregiver or teacher report, direct assessment, interview, observation), the age range and purpose (screening, diagnosis, assessment, etc.) for which each measure is appropriate, and the interpretation and use of results. In some cases they offer information on the instruments’ psychometric properties: reliability, validity for various uses, research support for claims of validity, etc. Some also have specific information regarding use with special populations. The ones called “reviews” provide evaluations. Additional reviews of specific instruments may often be found by searching the ERIC (http://www.eric.ed.gov) and PsycInfo (http://www.apa.org/psycinfo/) databases.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 449
Appendix D Sources of Detailed Information on Test and Assessment Instruments F or specific information on the features and content of instruments for use with infants and young children, the committee refers the reader to the following sources. They provide information on the construct measured, the content of the instrument, the time to administer, how the instrument is administered (e.g., caregiver or teacher report, direct assessment, interview, observation), the age range and purpose (screening, diagnosis, assessment, etc.) for which each measure is appropri- ate, and the interpretation and use of results. In some cases they offer information on the instruments’ psychometric properties: reliability, validity for various uses, research support for claims of validity, etc. Some also have specific information regarding use with special populations. The ones called “reviews” provide evaluations. Additional reviews of specific instruments may often be found by searching the ERIC (http://www.eric.ed.gov) and PsycInfo (http://www.apa.org/psycinfo/) databases. 

OCR for page 449
0 EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT RECENT PRINT REVIEWS AND COMPENDIUM DOCUMENTS Title: The th Mental Measurements Yearbook (Buros Institute of Mental Measurements, 2007) Source: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements Notes: Buros publishes periodic editions of its yearbook, the latest of which, the 17th, was released in 2007. The yearbook provides in- depth descriptions and critical reviews of current instruments. Titles: Early Childhood Measures Profiles (Child Trends, 2004); Quality in Early Childhood Care and Education Settings: A Compen- dium of Measures (Child Trends, 2007) Source: Child Trends Notes: The Child Trends organization has published two recent compendia of instruments for use with young children, one for child assessment and one for assessment of care and education environments. These provide in-depth descriptive informa - tion on each instrument, including descriptions of the norming populations. The compendium of child measures has extensive information on reliability and validity, both from the manual and from other research. The environmental measures compendium describes ways in which each measure addresses diversity, a fea- ture not addressed in many other sources. Title: Resources for Measuring Serices and Outcomes in Head Start Programs Sering Infants and Toddlers (Mathematica Policy Research, 2003) Source: Mathematica Policy Research Notes: Mathematica Policy Research developed this compendium of instruments for the Office of Head Start. It is oriented to the Head Start and Early Head Start programs, and its Appendix C has useful information on the measures used in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, including descriptions of

OCR for page 449
 APPENDIX D psychometric properties. It covers measures of child develop- ment; parenting, the home environment, and parent well-being; and program implementation and quality. Title: Screening for Deelopmental and Behaioral Problems Source: Glascoe (2005), Mental Retardation and Deelopmental Dis- abilities Research Reiews, (3), 173-179 Notes: This recent review article by Glascoe describes screening tools and instruments for use with infants and young children and is focused chiefly on instruments for use in pediatric surveillance and screening programs. Similar information authored by Glascoe is available at the DBPeds website (see below). Title: Deelopmental Screening Tools: Gross Motor/Fine Motor for Newborn, Infants and Children Source: (Beligere, Zawacki, Pennington, and Glascoe, 2007) (available at DBPeds website) Notes: Glascoe and colleagues provide a listing specifically of screening tools for gross motor and fine motor development, also available on the DBPeds website. Title: Assessing Social-Emotional Deelopment in Children from a Longitudinal Perspectie for the National Children’s Study: Social- Emotional Compendium of Measures Source: (Denham, 2005) (available at The National Children’s Study website) Notes: Denham provides extensive information on content and psychometric characteristics of social-emotional instruments, with additional comments on their use for the national children’s Study. She includes judgments on strengths and weaknesses of each measure reviewed, and references for research studies of each instrument. Many of the measures reviewed are not for young children.

OCR for page 449
 EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT Title: Deelopmental Screening and Assessment Instruments with an Emphasis on Social and Emotional Deelopment for Young Children Ages Birth Through Fie Source: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC) at the University of North Carolina (Ringwalt, 2008) Notes: A new resource, this document provides information, including psychometric properties, for a large number of multi- domain and socioemotional instruments. It is available at http:// www.nectac.org/~pdfs/pubs/screening.pdf. ONLINE DATABASES OF MEASUREMENT INSTRUMENTS Site: Buros Center for Testing URL: http://www.unl.edu/buros/ Notes: This is a service of the organization that has for many years produced the venerable print-based Mental Measurements Year- book (see above). It provides brief instrument descriptions avail- able online at no cost. In-depth test reviews from the yearbook, including information on the psychometric properties of instru- ments and how they were established, are available for purchase online at $15 per title. Site: National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) URL: http://nieer.org/assessment/ Notes: NIEER maintains an assessment database (accessed from the “Facts and Figures” tab on the NIEER homepage by selecting Assessment Database) that provides detailed information on the short list of early childhood measures categorized as “verified,” similar to that found at the Educational Testing Service (ETS) site. Much less information is given for “unverified” instruments. It does not provide much psychometric information but notes what information is available in instrument technical manuals. The site notes that much of its information was obtained from test publishers and other databases, including Buros, ETS, and ERIC.

OCR for page 449
 APPENDIX D (The ERIC database is no longer supported, but refers users to the ETS database.) Site: Educational Testing Service TestLink—“SydneyPlus knowledge Portal” URL: http://sydneyplus.ets.org Notes: This site provides a database of test and assessment instru- ments, including research instruments. For each instrument it provides a database record with fairly detailed descriptive infor- mation but does not review psychometric properties. Site: DBPeds URL: http://dbpeds.org Notes: This website, the homepage of the American Academy of Pediatrics section on developmental and behavioral pediatrics, provides a great deal of information on developmental screen- ing and assessment, including reviews of instruments, advice on incorporating screening into pediatric practice, and online learn- ing modules for pediatric professionals. It focuses on instruments of use to pediatric professionals. REFERENCES Beligere, N., Zawacki, L., Pennington, S., and Glascoe, F.P. (2007). Deelopmental screening tools: Gross motor/fine motor for newborn, infants and children. Available: http://www.dbpeds.org/articles/detail.cfm?TextID=%20738 [accessed June 2008]. Buros Institute of Mental Measurements. (2007). The seenteenth mental measure- ments yearbook. Lincoln, NE: Author. Child Trends. (2004). Early childhood measures profiles. Washington, DC: Author. Child Trends. (2007). Quality in early childhood care and education settings: A compendium of measures. Washington, DC: Author. Denham, S.E. (2005). Assessing social-emotional deelopment in children from a longitudinal perspectie for the National Children’s Study. Washington, DC: Battelle Memorial Institute. Glascoe, F.P. (2005). Screening for developmental and behavioral problems. Mental Retardation and Deelopmental Disabilities Research Reiews, (3), 173-179.

OCR for page 449
 EARLY CHILDHOOD ASSESSMENT Mathematica Policy Research. (2003). Resources for measuring serices and outcomes in Head Start programs sering infants and toddlers. Princeton, NJ: Author. Ringwalt, S. (2008). Deelopmental screening and assessment instruments with an emphasis on social and emotional deelopment for young children ages birth through fie. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, FPG Child Development Institute, National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center.