D
Biographies of Organizing Committee Members and Rapporteur

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

John K. Lauber, Chair, was senior vice president and chief product safety officer for Airbus SAS in Toulouse, France. Prior to assuming this position in January 2005, Dr. Lauber was vice president for safety and technical affairs for Airbus North America in Washington, D.C. Dr. Lauber holds a Ph.D. in neuropsychology from Ohio State University. He was vice president for training and human factors for Airbus Service Company from 1997 to 2000, and prior to joining Airbus was vice president for corporate safety and compliance at Delta Air Lines. He is a commercial pilot, with both airplane and helicopter ratings, and is type rated in the B727 and the A320. Dr. Lauber has also served as chief of the Aeronautical Human Factors Research Office for NASA, where he was instrumental in the development of advanced flight crew training concepts that are now used by airlines around the world. He has received numerous awards, including NASA’s Outstanding Leadership Award, the Flight Safety Foundation/Aviation Week and Space Technology Distinguished Service Award, and the Industry/Public Service Award from Air Transport World. He has also served on several NRC boards and committees.


Donald Fraser (NAE) is a director of DRS Technologies and has a broad reach of management experience. He was the founder and director of the Photonics Center at Boston University. He joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Instrumentation Laboratory (which became the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in 1973) as a member of the technical staff and later served as the director of the Control and Flight Dynamics Division, vice president of technical operations, and executive vice president. Dr. Fraser received his B.S. and M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics and his Sc.D. in instrumentation from MIT. From 1990 to 1991, Dr. Fraser was deputy director of operational test and evaluation for command, control, communications, and intelligence at the U.S. Department of Defense. He was the appointed principal deputy under secretary of defense (acquisition) from 1991 to 1993. From 1994 until he retired in 2006, Dr. Fraser was the director of Boston University’s Photonics Center and a professor of engineering and physics. His honors include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal. He is a former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, a former chair of three NRC study groups, and a former member of six other NRC study groups.


R. John Hansman, Jr., is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, head of the Humans and Automation Division, and director of the MIT International Center for Air Transportation. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in physics, meteorology, aeronautics and astronautics, and electrical engineering. In addition to teaching, Dr. Hansman conducts research in several areas related to air transportation, flight vehicle operations, and safety. His current research activities focus on information technology applied to air transportation systems, air traffic control, integrated human-automation systems, advanced vehicles, and advanced cockpit information systems. He is also an internationally recognized expert in aviation meteorological hazards such as icing and wind shear. Dr. Hansman is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board as well as a member of the NRC Committee for the Assessment of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Programs. He has served on the Committee to Identify Potential Breakthrough



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D Biographies of Organizing Committee Members and Rapporteur ORGANIZING COMMITTEE John K. Lauber, Chair, was senior vice president and chief product safety officer for Airbus SAS in Toulouse, France. Prior to assuming this position in January 2005, Dr. Lauber was vice president for safety and technical affairs for Airbus North America in Washington, D.C. Dr. Lauber holds a Ph.D. in neuropsychology from Ohio State University. He was vice president for training and human factors for Airbus Service Company from 1997 to 2000, and prior to joining Airbus was vice president for corporate safety and compliance at Delta Air Lines. He is a commercial pilot, with both airplane and helicopter ratings, and is type rated in the B727 and the A320. Dr. Lauber has also served as chief of the Aeronautical Human Factors Research Office for NASA, where he was instrumental in the development of advanced flight crew training concepts that are now used by airlines around the world. He has received numerous awards, including NASA’s Outstanding Leadership Award, the Flight Safety Foundation/Aviation Week and Space Technology Distinguished Service Award, and the Industry/Public Service Award from Air Transport World. He has also served on several NRC boards and committees. Donald Fraser (NAE) is a director of DRS Technologies and has a broad reach of management experience. He was the founder and director of the Photonics Center at Boston University. He joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Instrumentation Laboratory (which became the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in 1973) as a member of the technical staff and later served as the director of the Control and Flight Dynamics Division, vice president of technical operations, and executive vice president. Dr. Fraser received his B.S. and M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics and his Sc.D. in instrumentation from MIT. From 1990 to 1991, Dr. Fraser was deputy director of operational test and evaluation for command, control, communications, and intelligence at the U.S. Department of Defense. He was the appointed principal deputy under secretary of defense (acquisition) from 1991 to 1993. From 1994 until he retired in 2006, Dr. Fraser was the director of Boston University’s Photonics Center and a professor of engineering and physics. His honors include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal. He is a former member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, a former chair of three NRC study groups, and a former member of six other NRC study groups. R. John Hansman, Jr., is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, head of the Humans and Automation Division, and director of the MIT International Center for Air Transportation. He received his Ph.D. from MIT in physics, meteorology, aeronautics and astronautics, and electrical engineering. In addition to teaching, Dr. Hansman conducts research in several areas related to air transportation, flight vehicle operations, and safety. His current research activities focus on information technology applied to air transportation systems, air traffic control, integrated human-automation systems, advanced vehicles, and advanced cockpit information systems. He is also an internationally recognized expert in aviation meteorological hazards such as icing and wind shear. Dr. Hansman is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board as well as a member of the NRC Committee for the Assessment of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Programs. He has served on the Committee to Identify Potential Breakthrough 24

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Technologies and Assess Long-Term R&D Goals in Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology and the Committee on the Effects of Aircraft-Pilot Coupling on Flight Safety. John B. Hayhurst retired in 2004 as senior vice president of the Boeing Company and president of Boeing Air Traffic Management after 33 years at Boeing and 3½ years in this position. Previously, Mr. Hayhurst was vice president of business development for the Commercial Airplane Services business unit of Boeing Commercial Airplanes Group (BCAG). Mr. Hayhurst’s other Boeing assignments included general manager of the BCAG production site in Renton, Washington; vice president and general manager of 737 programs; BCAG vice president of sales; and BCAG vice president of the Americas⎯ with responsibility for the Boeing business relationships with airline customers in North America and Latin America and for the sale of Boeing commercial airplanes to customers in those regions. Mr. Hayhurst joined Boeing in 1969 as a customer support engineer. He held positions of increasing responsibility related to commercial airplanes and in 1987 was promoted to vice president of marketing. In this position, he played a significant role in the launch of the Boeing 777. Subsequently, he was responsible for leading teams planning the design, development, and manufacture of aircraft larger than the Boeing 747. He then served as vice president-general manager of the Boeing 747-500X/600X program. Mr. Hayhurst is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and holds a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University. He received a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Washington in 1971. In 1998, Mr. Hayhurst was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering by Purdue University. He is a member of the NRC Committee for the Assessment of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Program. S. Michael Hudson is vice chair (retired) of Rolls-Royce North America. Mr. Hudson assumed that position in early 2000 and continued in that role through his retirement in the spring of 2002. He graduated from the University of Texas with a degree in mechanical engineering. Mr. Hudson has served as chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of design for the Model 250 engines, and chief of preliminary design and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines during his tenure at Allison. From 1962 to 1968, he was employed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, working in aircraft engine design, installation and performance, engine development and demonstration, and industrial and marine engine application engineering. His honors include membership as a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Royal Aeronautical Society, an honorary fellow of the American Helicopter Society, and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Mr. Hudson has served as chair of the SAE’s Aerospace Council. He has also been on its Aerospace Program Office Committee and its Finance Committee. He has served as chair of the ASEB Committee on Technology Pathways and testified to the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics of the House Committee on Science, March 29, 2006, on assessing the integrated plan for a next-generation air transportation system. Charles E. Keegan is director of Future Air Navigation systems for Raytheon’s Network Centric Systems Airspace Management and Homeland Security business. In this role, he leads the NextGen initiative, Navigation and Landing Systems product line, and mergers and acquisitions efforts. Mr. Keegan graduated from Daniel Webster College in 1981 with a B.S. degree in air traffic control and business management. Prior to joining Raytheon, he was vice president, Operations Planning, for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as well as chair and director of the FAA’s Joint Program Development Office. As head of the JPDO, Keegan was responsible for the development and delivery of the NGATS plan for 2020 and beyond. Mr. Keegan served as the Air Traffic Organization’s vice president for en route and oceanic operations, which included carrying out new en route capabilities and oceanic airspace services delegated to the FAA by the International Civil Aviation Organization. In that role, he was responsible for the delivery of all en route air traffic services. He was also responsible for the financial management associated with providing these services. Mr. Keegan’s experience includes 25

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directing system requirements and managing quality assurance and training programs. His first position with the FAA was as an air traffic controller. He is also a licensed pilot. Beth Lyall has served as a consultant and contractor to the FAA on human factors issues related to flight deck automation design, training, operations, and certification for over 15 years. Dr. Lyall gained her Ph.D. from Arizona State University. She founded Research Integrations, Inc., to be an independent voice to influence flight safety through conducting and applying relevant research. She has served as a member of the international harmonization working group to develop a new regulation addressing human factors in flight deck design for transport-category airplanes and is currently serving on the Flight Deck Automation Working Group that is identifying current and future safety and other operational issues with the design, training, operation, and certification of flight deck automated systems and their interaction in the current and future air space. Research Integrations also has developed and maintains the Web site www.flightdeckautomation.com, which includes a searchable database of flight deck automation issues and related research findings for each of those issues. Gen. Lester L. Lyles retired from the Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as commander. Gen. Lyles received a BSME from Howard University and an M.S. in mechanical and nuclear engineering from New Mexico State University. He has served in various assignments, including program element monitor of the Short-Range Attack Missile at Headquarters U.S. Air Force, special assistant and aide-de-camp to the Commander of Air Force Systems Command, Avionics Division chief in the F-16 Systems Program Office, director of Tactical Aircraft Systems at AFSC headquarters, and director of the Medium-Launch Vehicles Program and Space-Launch Systems offices. Gen. Lyles became AFSC headquarters’ assistant deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1989 and deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1990. In 1992, he became vice commander of Ogden Air Logistics Center, Hill AFB, Utah. He served as commander of the center until 1994, and then was assigned to command the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles AFB, California, until 1996. Gen. Lyles became the director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization in 1996. In May 1999, he was assigned as vice chief of staff at USAF/HQ. He has served as the vice chair on the NRC Committee on Systems Engineering: A Retrospective Review and Benefits for Future Air Force Systems Acquisition and was a member of the Committee on Systems Integration for Project Constellation. Nadine B. Sarter is associate professor in the University of Michigan’s Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering Center for Ergonomics. She is a private pilot, rated for airplane single-engine land, and completed Airbus A-320 airline pilot training in 1994. She received a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from Ohio State University. She has an M.S. in applied and experimental psychology from the University of Hamburg, Germany. Dr. Sarter has been associate editor of the IEEE’s Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems since 2002 and is on the editorial boards of Human Factors, Journal of Experimental Psychology, Applied Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, Applied Ergonomics, International Journal of Aviation Psychology, and Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments. She has received numerous awards from NASA as well as the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering and the American Psychological Association’s Division of Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology. Dr. Sarter was an invited participant at numerous workshops, including the DARPA ISAT Workshop on Discovery and Innovation During Field Use of Information Technologies; the 2006 NSF Human-Centered Computing Workshop; and the Joint Program Development Office Workshop on Next Generation Air Transportation System Human-Automation Interaction Issues and Research Needs. She has also served on several NRC committees and workshops. Edmond L. Soliday was employed by United Airlines for more than 35 years as a pilot, operations expert, human factors instructor, flight manager, and staff executive, serving the last 11 as vice president for safety, quality assurance, and security. He has served on numerous aviation safety-related advisory 26

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boards and commissions, and has extensive experience in flight operations. Over the course of his career, Capt. Soliday has chaired the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the Air Transport Association Safety Council, the Star Alliance Safety Committee, and the ATA Environmental Committee. He formerly served on the Executive Board of the Flight Safety Foundation. Capt. Soliday currently serves on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Global Airline Industry Program Advisory Group and is an Indiana State Representative serving on the Transportation, Commerce, Energy and Technology committees. Among his awards are the Bendix Trophy, the Vanguard Trophy, and the Laura Tabor Barbour International Air Safety Award. Capt. Soliday has previously served on four NRC study groups. RAPPORTEUR Deborah A. Boehm-Davis is currently a professor of psychology in the Human Factors and Applied Cognition Program at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. She holds an A.B. in psychology from Rutgers State University (Douglass College) and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. She worked on applied cognitive research at General Electric, NASA Ames, and Bell Laboratories prior to joining George Mason University in 1984. She is interested in how human performance is helped or hindered by the design of tools that help accomplish everyday tasks. Her particular research interest is in how improved display of information can improve human performance. Dr. Boehm-Davis is the president-elect of Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology) of the American Psychological Association. In the past, she served as the president and the secretary-treasurer of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She is on the editorial boards of Human Factors, the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, and Theoretical Issues in Ergonomic Sciences. Awards she has received include the Franklin Taylor Award from the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society (1985); the Washington Academy of Sciences Award for Scientific Achievement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences (1994); selection as a member of the Douglass Society (2002); and the Franklin V. Taylor Award from Division 21 of the American Psychological Association (2003). She is a fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 27

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