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Speakers at the Summit

JEFF BINGAMAN is currently serving his fifth term in the U.S. Senate representing the state of New Mexico. He is chair of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and has been involved in all major U.S. energy legislation since his election to the Senate in 1982. Senator Bingaman also serves on the Senate Finance Committee, where he is chair of the Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure. He also serves on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, and the Joint Economic Committee. Prior to his Senate career, Senator Bingaman served as New Mexico’s Attorney General. After graduating from Harvard University, he earned a law degree at Stanford University and practiced law in New Mexico until his election as Attorney General.


SAMUEL W. BODMAN is the 11th U.S. Secretary of Energy. Prior to this, he served as an associate professor of chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and began his work in the financial sector as technical director of the American Research and Development Corporation, a pioneer venture capital firm. From there, Secretary Bodman went to Fidelity Venture Associates, a division of Fidelity Investments where, in 1983, he was named president and COO and a director of the Fidelity Group of Mutual Funds. In 1987, he joined Cabot Corporation, where he served as chairman, CEO, and a director. He is a former director of MIT’s School of Engineering Practice and a former member of the MIT Commission on Education. Secretary Bodman is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Cornell University and a D.Sc. degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



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B Speakers at the Summit JEFF BINGAMAN is currently serving his fifth term in the U.S. Senate repre- senting the state of New Mexico. He is chair of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and has been involved in all major U.S. energy legislation since his election to the Senate in 1982. Senator Bingaman also serves on the Senate Finance Committee, where he is chair of the Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure. He also serves on the Health, Educa- tion, Labor and Pensions Committee, and the Joint Economic Committee. Prior to his Senate career, Senator Bingaman served as New Mexico’s Attorney General. After graduating from Harvard University, he earned a law degree at Stanford University and practiced law in New Mexico until his election as Attorney General. SAMUEL W. BODMAN is the 11th U.S. Secretary of Energy. Prior to this, he served as an associate professor of chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and began his work in the financial sector as technical director of the American Research and Development Corporation, a pioneer venture capital firm. From there, Secretary Bodman went to Fidelity Venture Associates, a division of Fidelity Investments where, in 1983, he was named president and COO and a director of the Fidelity Group of Mutual Funds. In 1987, he joined Cabot Corporation, where he served as chairman, CEO, and a director. He is a former director of MIT’s School of Engineering Practice and a former member of the MIT Commission on Education. Secretary Bodman is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Cornell University and a D.Sc. degree from Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology. 

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 APPENDIX B STEVEN CHU is director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and professor of physics and molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a leader in U.S. and international energy science and technology communities and recently co-chaired the InterAcademy Coun- cil study, Lighting the Way: Toward a Sustainable Energy Future. Dr. Chu has numerous awards, including the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received A.B. and B.S. degrees in mathematics and physics from the University of Rochester, a Ph.D. in physics from University of California, Berkeley, and 10 honorary degrees. RALPH J. CICERONE is president of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the National Research Council. He is an atmospheric scientist whose research in atmospheric chemistry and climate change has involved him in shap- ing science and environmental policy at the highest levels nationally and inter- nationally. His research was recognized on the citation for the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to University of California, Irvine, colleague F. Sherwood Rowland. The Franklin Institute recognized his fundamental contributions to the understanding of greenhouse gases and ozone depletion by selecting Dr. Cicerone as the 1999 laureate for the Bower Award and Prize for Achieve- ment in Science and recognition of his public policy leadership in protecting the global environment. Dr. Cicerone is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineer- ing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and both his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Illinois in electrical engineering. JON CREYTS is a principal in the Chicago office of McKinsey & Company, Inc., which he joined in October 2000. He is the U.S. lead for the McKinsey Special Initiative on Climate Change and a co-leader of the global Capital Pro- ductivity Practice. Dr. Creyts has a concentrated knowledge of environmental management, capital productivity, plant operations, and fuel marketing and sourcing strategies and has served clients in the electric power, metals and min- ing, petroleum, travel and logistics, and retail sectors. Dr. Creyts received a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. GED DAVIS is co-president of the Global Energy Assessment at IIASA in Laxenburg, Austria. Until March 2007 he was managing director of the World Economic Forum, responsible for global research, scenario projects, and the design of the annual Forum meeting at Davos. Before joining the Forum, Mr. Davis spent 30 years with Royal Dutch Shell. He was the vice president of glo- bal business environment for Shell International in London and head of Shell’s scenario planning team. In this capacity he participated in a wide variety of

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0 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE global, regional, country, and industry scenario projects, many with a special focus on energy and environment. He has worked on many global projects for international institutions, including IPCC, IUCN, WBCSD, WEF, WEC, and UN agencies. He is currently advising a number of international institutions. ROBERT W. FRI is a visiting scholar and senior fellow emeritus at Resources for the Future, where he served as president from 1986 to 1995. From 1996 to 2001 he served as director of the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. Before joining the Smithsonian, Mr. Fri served in both the public and private sectors, specializing in energy and environmental issues. In 1971 he became the first deputy administrator of the Environmental Protec- tion Agency. In 1975, President Ford appointed him as the deputy administra- tor of the Energy Research and Development Administration. He served as act- ing administrator of both agencies for extended periods. He received his B.A. degree in physics from Rice University and his M.B.A. degree (with distinction) from Harvard University. He is vice chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and recently chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on Review of the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. KELLY SIMS GALLAGHER is director of the Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and an adjunct lecturer in the Kennedy School of Govern- ment. She is an international member of the Task Force on Innovation for the China Council International Cooperation on Environment and Development. She recently published China Shifts Gears: Automakers, Oil, Pollution, and Deelopment. Formerly, she was the science policy director of Ozone Action in Washington, D.C. She participated in more than a dozen rounds of inter- national negotiations on global climate change and ozone depletion, and was an advisor to CNN in Kyoto and Buenos Aires for the climate negotiations. She was previously a Truman Scholar in the Office of Vice President Gore and worked in strategic planning at the international engineering and construction firm, Fluor Daniel. She has an A.B. degree in international affairs and environ- mental studies from Occidental College, and an M.A. in law and diplomacy and a Ph.D. in international affairs from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. JOSE GOLDEMBERG is the secretary for the environment for the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and co-chair of the Global Energy Assessment Council of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He has served as the president of the Brazilian Association for the Advancement of Science, minister of state for education of the Federal Government of Brazil, and secretary for the environment of the State of São Paulo. He has authored many technical

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 APPENDIX B papers and books on nuclear physics, sustainable development, and energy. Dr. Goldemberg co-chaired the 2007 InterAcademy Council study, Lighting the Way: Toward a Sustainable Energy Future. In 2000, he was one of four recipients of the Volvo Environmental Prize presented in Sweden. A native of Brazil, Dr. Goldemberg earned his Ph.D. in physical science from the University of São Paulo. JOHN P. HOLDREN is the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, as well as presi- dent and director of the Woods Hole Research Center. From 1994 to 2001 he was a member of President Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology and led major studies for the White House on U.S. energy research and development strategy, nuclear nonproliferation, and international coopera- tion on energy. Since 2002 he has been co-chair of the independent, bipartisan National Commission on Energy Policy and co-led the National Commission’s project resulting in the major report, Ending the Energy Stalemate. He is also the coordinating lead author of the Scientific Expert Group on Climate Change and Sustainable Development. Dr. Holdren is a member of the National Acad- emy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. REUBEN JEFFERY III is the undersecretary, economic, energy and agricul- tural affairs at the U.S. Department of State, where he serves as the senior economic official. Dr. Jeffery advises the secretary of state on international economic policy. He leads the work of the State Department on issues rang- ing from trade, agriculture, and aviation to bilateral relations with America’s economic partners. Dr. Jeffery received his B.A. degree in political science from Yale University in 1975 and J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Stanford University in 1981. AMORY LOVINS co-founded the Rocky Mountain Institute in 1982 and serves as its chief executive officer, research. An experimental physicist educated at Harvard and Oxford, Dr. Lovins rose to prominence during the oil crises of the 1970s when he challenged conventional supply-side dogma by urging that the United States instead follow a “soft energy path.” His controversial recom- mendations were eventually accepted by the energy industry, and his book, Soft Energy Paths: Toward a Durable Peace (1977), went on to inspire a generation of decision makers. Dr. Lovins’ work today focuses on transforming the car, real- estate, electricity, water, semiconductor, and several other manufacturing sec- tors toward advanced resource productivity. Since 1990, he has led the develop- ment of quintupled-efficiency, uncompromised, competitive automobiles and

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2 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE a profitable hydrogen transition strategy. Dr. Lovins was principal investigator for a major report released in 2004, Winning the Oil End Game. ROBERT MARLAY is the deputy director of the U.S. Climate Change Tech- nology Program and is a career member of the government’s Senior Execu- tive Service. He has more than 30 years of federal service and has been with the U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies since 1974. His contributions have focused primarily in the areas of national security, energy policy, science policy, and management of research and development programs. He serves concurrently as the department’s director for the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Office of Policy, and International Affairs. He holds a B.S. degree in engineering from Duke University and a Ph.D. from the Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a licensed professional engineer in the District of Columbia. Dr. Marlay was a key contributor to the 2006 interagency report U.S. Climate Change Technology Program Strategic Plan. RICHARD A. MESERVE is the president of the Carnegie Institution for Sci- ence. He served as chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) from 1999 to 2003, and he led the USNRC in responding to the 9/11 attacks. Dr. Meserve was elected to serve as a director of PG&E Corporation and Pacific Gas and Electric Company in 2006 and of Luminant Holding Company in 2008. He also serves on an advisory board to UniStar Nuclear Company, a joint venture of Constellation Energy and Électricité de France that seeks to market and operate nuclear power plants. Among other affiliations, he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Meserve received his undergraduate degree from Tufts University and his J.D. degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. degree in applied physics from Stanford University. ERNEST J. MONIZ is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems, director of the Energy Initiative, and director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has served on the faculty since 1973. Dr. Moniz served as undersecretary of the Department of Energy from 1997 until January 2001 and, from 1995 to 1997, as associate director for science in the Office of Sci- ence and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. Dr. Moniz received a B.S. degree summa cum laude in physics from Boston College and a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University. Dr. Moniz was a co-chair of the recent major interdisciplinary Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology studies that produced the reports The Future of Nuclear Power and The Future of Coal. RODNEY NELSON is vice president of strategic marketing for Schlumberger Oilfield Services. Previously, Mr. Nelson was president of Schlumberger Data

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 APPENDIX B and Consulting Services where he directed operations of the industry’s largest data processing and geotechnical consulting organization for clients worldwide. Mr. Nelson holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the University of Wisconsin and an executive M.B.A. from the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology’s Sloan School of Management. Mr. Nelson was the Technology task group chair of the major effort completed in 2007 by the National Petroleum Council, entitled Facing the Hard Truths About Energy. RAY L. ORBACH is the U.S. Department of Energy’s first undersecretary for science. Prior to his appointment as undersecretary he was the Department’s 14th director of the Office of Science. Dr. Orbach has received numerous honors as a scholar, including two Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowships; a National Science Foundation senior postdoctoral fellowship at Oxford Uni- versity; a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship at Tel Aviv University; the Joliot Curie Professorship at the Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris; the Lorentz Professorship at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands; the 1991-1992 Andrew Lawson Memorial Lecturer at University of California, Riverside; and the 2004 Arnold O. Beckman Lecturer in Science and Innovation at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Orbach received his B.S. degree in physics from the California Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. KENNETH J. OSTROWSKI is a director in the Atlanta Office of McKinsey & Company with more than 23 years of consulting experience. Mr. Ostrowski is the leader of McKinsey’s North America Electric Power and Natural Gas (EPNG) Practice and co-leads the Global EPNG Practice. Over the course of his career, he has served electric power, natural gas, and industrial clients in refining their strategic aspirations and direction, and in aligning the organiza- tional, regulatory, and operational elements necessary to execute them. Before joining McKinsey, Mr. Ostrowski was an intern at the Congressional Budget Office and completed the 2-year Financial Management Program at General Electric Company. He received an M.B.A. in general management with honors from Harvard Business School and a bachelor’s degree in finance, magna cum laude, from the University of Notre Dame. PAUL R. PORTNEY is the dean and Halle Chair in Leadership of the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. From 1972 through June 2005, Dr. Portney was with Resources for the Future, where he headed two of its research divisions before becoming its vice president and then president and CEO. From 1979 to 1980, he also served as chief economist for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Dr. Portney received his B.A. in economics from Alma College in Michigan and his Ph.D. in economics from

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 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE Northwestern University. Dr. Portney was chair of the National Research Coun- cil committee that produced the report Automotie Fuel Economy: How Far Should We Go? MICHAEL P. RAMAGE is the retired executive vice president of Exxon- Mobil Research and Engineering Company. Previously he was executive vice president, chief technology officer, and director of Mobil Oil Corporation. He has broad experience in many aspects of the petroleum and chemical indus- tries and is a member of Secretary of Energy Bodman’s Hydrogen Technical Advisory Council. Dr. Ramage chaired the National Research Council study that produced the report The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Bar- riers, and R&D Needs and is currently chairing the Committee on Resource Requirements for a Hydrogen Economy and the Panel on Alternative Liquid Transportation Fuel of the America’s Energy Future effort. Dr. Ramage has B.S., M.S., Ph.D., and H.D.R. degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University and is a member and former council member of the National Acad- emy of Engineering. DAN W. REICHER is the director of Climate Change and Energy Initiatives for Google. Prior to this Dr. Reicher served as president and co-founder of New Energy Capital Corp., a New England-based company that develops, invests in, owns, and operates renewable energy and distributed generation projects. He is currently a member of General Electric’s Ecomagination Advisory Board, co-chair of the advisory board of the American Council on Renewable Energy, and a member of the board of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. From 1997-2001, Dr. Reicher was assistant secretary of energy for energy efficiency and renewable energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. He holds a B.A. in biology from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Stanford Law School. He also studied at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. MAXINE SAVITZ is vice president of the National Academy of Engineering, director of the Washington Advisory Group, and a member of the board of directors of the Charles Stark Draper Laboratories. She is a former deputy assis- tant secretary for conservation of the U.S. Department of Energy and received the Outstanding Service Medal from the DOE in 1981. Prior to her DOE service, she was program manager for research applied to national needs at the National Science Foundation. She recently retired from the position of general manager for technology partnerships at Honeywell after over 30 years of man- aging research, development, and implementation programs for the public and private sectors. She holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. degree in chemistry from Bryn Mawr Col- lege. Dr. Savitz is the vice chair of the Panel on Energy Efficiency Technologies of the America’s Energy Future project.

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 APPENDIX B JAMES R. SCHLESINGER is chair of the MITRE Corporation and a senior advisor for the investment banking firm, Lehman Brothers. He is a consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense, a member of the Defense Policy Board, a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, and director for Peabody Energy, KFx, Inc., and Sandia National Corporation. Dr. Schlesinger was the nation’s first secretary of energy and also served as director of Central Intel- ligence, secretary of defense, and chair of the Atomic Energy Commission. Dr. Schlesinger received a B.A. degree summa cum laude from Harvard College, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and was selected for the Frederick Sheldon Prize Fellowship. He received his M.A. and doctoral degrees in eco- nomics from Harvard University. HAROLD T. SHAPIRO is president emeritus of Princeton University and a professor of economics and public affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He served as president of Princeton from 1988 to 2001 and president of the University of Michigan from 1980 to 1988. Dr. Shapiro chaired the National Bioethics Advisory Committee under Presi- dent Clinton and served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology under President Bush. He holds a bachelor’s degree from McGill University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Princeton University as well as 14 honorary doctoral degrees. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Philosophical Society, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, a member of the board of directors of Dow Chemical Company, and a member of the board of overseers of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Shapiro is currently chairing the National Research Council study, “America’s Energy Future: Technology Opportunities, Risks, and Tradeoffs.” STEVEN R. SPECKER is president and chief executive officer of the Electric Power Research Institute. Prior to joining EPRI, Dr. Specker served as presi- dent of Specker Consulting, LLC, where he provided operational and strategic planning services to technology companies serving the global electric power industry. In January 2003, he retired from General Electric as vice president of global marketing for GE Energy where he oversaw development of products and services for the generation, transmission, and distribution of electric power. He holds a B.S. degree in engineering science, an M.S. in nuclear engineering, and a doctorate in nuclear engineering from Iowa State University. CHARLES M. VEST is president of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and vice chair of the National Research Council. Prior to his election as NAE president, Dr. Vest served as president of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology from 1990 to 2004. During his tenure, the Massachusetts Institute of

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 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE Technology launched its OpenCourseWare initiative, co-founded the Alliance for Global Sustainability, enhanced the racial, gender, and cultural diversity of its students and faculty, established major new institutes in neuroscience and genomic medicine, and redeveloped much of its campus. Dr. Vest served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology during both the Clinton and Bush administrations, the Commission on the Intelligence Capabil- ities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, the secretary of education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education, the secretary of state’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy, and the Rice- Chertoff Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee. He serves on the boards of several nonprofit organizations and foundations devoted to edu- cation, science, and technology. Dr. Vest has received honorary doctoral degrees from 10 universities and was awarded the 2006 National Medal of Technology by President Bush. He earned his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University and an M.S. degree in engineering and a Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan.