E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H. (IOM) (Chair), is associate vice dean, chair, and professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, as well as a George S. Pepper Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, and director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Internationally known for multiple areas of clinical epidemiology, Dr. Strom’s major career interest is pharmacoepidemiology, specifically looking at adverse drug reactions and medical errors. He received his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his master’s of public health from the University of California at Berkeley. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He was chair of the IOM’s Committee to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of the Anthrax Vaccine and the IOM’s Committee on the Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation, as well as a member of the IOM’s Committee to Review the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Anthrax Vaccine Safety and Efficacy Research Program.


Robin Baker, M.P.H., is the coordinator of public programs at the University of California (UC) at Berkeley’s School of Public Health and director of the Labor Occupational Health Program (LOHP). LOHP is a community service program that provides training, information, and assistance to workers, labor organizations, joint labor-management health and safety committees, community-based environmental justice groups, and others. Robin Baker is a health educator with more than 20 years of experience in the occupational health field and is an instructor in



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E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H. (IOM) (Chair), is associate vice dean, chair, and pro- fessor in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, as well as a George S. Pepper Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, and director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Internation- ally known for multiple areas of clinical epidemiology, Dr. Strom’s major career interest is pharmacoepidemiology, specifically looking at adverse drug reactions and medical errors. He received his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and his master’s of public health from the University of Califor- nia at Berkeley. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He was chair of the IOM’s Committee to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of the Anthrax Vaccine and the IOM’s Committee on the Smallpox Vaccination Program Implementation, as well as a member of the IOM’s Committee to Review the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Anthrax Vaccine Safety and Efficacy Research Program. Robin Baker, M.P.H., is the coordinator of public programs at the University of California (UC) at Berkeley’s School of Public Health and director of the Labor Occupational Health Program (LOHP). LOHP is a community service program that provides training, information, and assistance to workers, labor organizations, joint labor-management health and safety committees, community-based envi- ronmental justice groups, and others. Robin Baker is a health educator with more than 20 years of experience in the occupational health field and is an instructor in 203

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t R au m at I C I n j u Ry R e s e a R C h nIosh 0 at the graduate public health education program at UC Berkeley. She has published numerous articles and resources on worker training. She currently directs more than a dozen federal- and state-funded projects ranging from an examination of the experience of injured workers in the California Workers’ Compensation system to a pilot school-based program to educate teen workers. Before coming to LOHP in 1981, she directed a worker training program for electronics workers in Silicon Valley and served on the staff of the California-Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA) education unit. In addition, she serves as director of several major projects, including the California Worker Occupational Safety and Health Training and Education Program, the Working Immigrant Safety and Health (WISH) Coalition, and the National Young Worker Health and Safety Re- source Center. Leslie I. Boden, Ph.D., is professor of public health and associate chair of the De- partment of Environmental Health at Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH). He is an economist, and much of his research has focused on finding ways to highlight the economic and human consequences of injuries and illnesses and to identify ways of minimizing those consequences. Over the past several years, Dr. Boden has published studies measuring the income lost by injured workers and the adequacy of workers’ compensation benefits. With BUSPH colleague Lee Strunin, he has also published several studies of the post-injury experiences of workers and their families. Recently, Dr. Boden has been working on a study that estimates underreporting of workplace injuries. He has also written on occupa- tional safety and health regulation, medical screening, gender inequality, and the legal and public health use of scientific information. From 1988 to 1997, Dr. Boden served on the Mine Health Research Advisory Committee of the Department of Health and Human Services, which he chaired for 6 years. In 2001-2002, he was a member of the Worker Advocacy Advisory Group, which advised the Department of Energy on occupational disease compensation. He has also co-chaired a group advising the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) on its research agenda on the social and economic consequences of workplace illness and injury. Barry Bozeman, Ph.D., is an Ander Crenshaw Professor and Regents’ Professor of Public Policy at the University of Georgia. He holds an appointment as adjunct honorary professor of political science at the University of Copenhagen. Before joining the University of Georgia he was Regent’s Professor of Public Policy, Georgia Tech, and professor of public administration and adjunct professor of engineering, the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. At Georgia Tech, he was the first full-time director of the School of Public Policy and the founding director of the Research

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appendIx e 205 Value Mapping Program. At Syracuse University, he was founding director of the Center for Technology and Information Policy. Bozeman’s practitioner experience includes a position at the National Science Foundation’s Division of Information Technology and a visiting position at the Science and Technology Agency’s (Japan) National Institute of Science and Technology Policy. Bozeman is coeditor of the Journal of Technology Transfer. He has served as a consultant to a variety of federal and state agencies in the United States, including the Internal Revenue Service, the Department of Commerce, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Energy (DOE). He has helped in the design and evaluation of the national innovation systems of the Republic of South Africa, Canada, New Zealand, France, Chile, and Argentina. His research has been funded by grants from NSF, DOE, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Department of Commerce, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Office of Naval Research, the Kel- logg Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, among others. He has served on four National Academy of Sciences-National Academy of Engineering panels. He is author or editor of 15 books. Stephen W. Hargarten, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and chairman of the Depart- ment of Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). He has been practicing emergency medicine for more than 30 years. He received his M.D. from the Medical College of Wisconsin and his M.P.H. from the Bloomberg School of Public Health. He currently serves as the director of the Injury Research Center at MCW, 1 of 12 CDC-funded centers in the United States. For more than 20 years he has been an active injury prevention and control researcher, educator, and practitioner. He recently served on the advisory committee for developing the acute care research agenda for the National Injury Control and Prevention Center of CDC. Dr. Hargarten has published frequently in the peer-reviewed literature on injury topics. His major injury-related activities include injury surveillance (particularly linked data sets), violence, injury of travelers, and trauma system development. He currently also serves as the director of the Firearm Injury Center at MCW. He is the immediate past president of the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research and is currently a member of the board of Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety. Brian M. Kleiner, Ph.D., is professor of industrial and systems engineering and founding director of the Center for Innovation in Construction Safety and Health, a core research unit in the Myers-Lawson School of Construction at Virginia Poly- technic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). He is immediate past director of the Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Center and currently directs the Macroergonomics and Group Decision Systems Laboratory in the Grado De-

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t R au m at I C I n j u Ry R e s e a R C h nIosh 0 at partment of Industrial and Systems Engineering. His interest in the sociotechnical nature of work systems is supported by his educational training in both psychology and engineering. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in industrial engineering (human factors engineering-ergonomics concentration) from the State University of New York at Buffalo and has a B.A. in psychology. Dr. Kleiner’s research interests focus on systems or macroergonomics for improved safety, health, and performance. Tom B. Leamon, Ph.D., C.P.E., was a vice president of Liberty Mutual Insurance Group and is director emeritus of the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety. Dr. Leamon was responsible for the research program in occupational safety and rehabilitation and has published research on integrated approaches to occupa- tional injury and illness, industrial ergonomics, and evaluation of criteria for the prevention of low back pain disability. He is currently developing a significant surveillance study of occupational injury in Vietnam. He also serves as an adjunct professor of occupational safety at the Harvard School of Public Health and is a term member of the NIOSH-National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) liaison committee. Dr. Leamon is a fellow of the Ergonomics Society, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and the Institution of Electrical Engineers (U.K.). He is a board-certified professional ergonomist, a chartered engineer (U.K.), and a European engineer. Dr. Leamon received his Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the Institute of Technology, Cranfield. James M. Melius, M.D., Dr.P.H., is director of the New York State Laborers’ Health and Safety Trust Fund and director of research for the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America. His work focuses on the development and promotion of health and safety programs in the construction industry. He is currently a member of the Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health and is past chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registries. He was also a member of the NIOSH Board of Scientific Counselors and of the CDC Advisory Committee for the Elimination of Tuberculosis. He worked for NIOSH from 1980 to 1987 where he directed NIOSH’s main workplace consul- tation program. From 1987 to 1994, he worked for the New York State Department of Health where he directed environmental and occupational health programs including the development of a network of occupational health clinics. Mark S. Redfern, Ph.D., is co-director of the Medical Virtual Reality Center as well as a William Kepler Whiteford Professor of Bioengineering at the Univer- sity of Pittsburgh. He has appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering, Otolaryngology, and Rehabilitation Science. He received his B.S. in engineering science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1978. In 1980, he earned

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appendIx e 207 a certificate in prosthetics from New York University and worked for 3 years as a clinical prosthetist. In 1988 he earned a Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Michigan. At Pittsburgh, Dr. Redfern’s research is focused in two areas: human postural control and ergonomics. The major goal of the postural control research is the prevention of falling injuries by investigating the factors that influence bal- ance in older adults and patients with balance disorders. The ergonomic research focus has been in the area of fall prevention and reducing injuries in the workplace through ergonomic redesign. Gordon R. Reeve, Ph.D., recently retired from the position of corporate epidemi- ologist at Ford Motor Company after having spent 21 years in the public health industry. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas School of Public Health in 1982, with major concentrations in epidemiology and toxicology as well as industrial hygiene. He also received a master’s degree in public health from the University of Texas in 1975, where his focus was occupational health. From 1975 through 1979, he coordinated a program at the University of Texas Cancer Center to evaluate the effectiveness of lung cancer screening for asbestos workers. In the summer of 1979 he began work at NIOSH in Cincinnati. During the next 5 years, he conducted several occupational cancer studies involving chemical industry work- ers, as well as a major study of heart disease among munitions workers exposed to nitroglycerin. In 1989, Dr. Reeve obtained the position of corporate epidemiolo- gist at Ford Motor Company. At Ford, he conducted occupational health research jointly with the United Auto Workers Union, which involved 800,000 of Ford’s current and former employees. Dr. Reeve completed the major effort of designing a near-real-time injury surveillance system, which was installed at 57 Ford plant locations in 1994. His research interests and assignments include risk factors as- sociated with acute and cumulative trauma, linkages between injury data and manufacturing quality indicators, and patterns of healthcare utilization. Joseph J. Schwerha, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of occupational medicine in the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh and is the director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency and the Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response Certificate Programs. Prior to working at the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Schwerha was general manager of health services and corporate medical director at U.S. Steel. His research interests are in medical administration and education as well as all aspects of environmental health and safety and medical surveillance. He serves on the IOM Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment and the Committee on Training Physicians for Pub- lic Health Careers. He holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh, a master’s of public health in environmental health and industrial

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t R au m at I C I n j u Ry R e s e a R C h nIosh 0 at hygiene from the University of Michigan, and a medical degree from West Virginia University School of Medicine. He is actively involved on the editorial boards of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the Official Disability Guidelines. He is a recipient of the William S. Knudsen Award, the highest interna- tional award in occupational medicine, from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine in 2005. FRAMEWORK COMMITTEE LIAISON Letitia K. Davis, Sc.D., Ed.M., is director of the Occupational Health Surveillance Program in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health where she has worked for the last 20 years to develop state-based surveillance systems for work-related illnesses and injuries. The Occupational Health Surveillance Program uses surveil- lance findings to inform state and local prevention activities and over the years has undertaken a variety of educational intervention activities, as well. Dr. Davis has served as principal investigator for a community-based intervention project to enhance the health and safety of young workers. More recently she has served as principal investigator for a study examining the feasibility of working with com- munity health centers to collect data on occupational health experiences of immi- grant workers. Dr. Davis is also lead occupational health consultant to the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Dr. Davis serves as adjunct faculty of the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and as a visiting lecturer on occupational health at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is also a past member of the NIOSH Board of Scientific Counselors and of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Davis received her doctorate in occupational health from the Harvard School of Public Health. She has previously served on the IOM Panel on the Health and Safety Implications of Child Labor.