FIGURE 3-5 Respondents’ views on whether sources of information could provide sufficient information for an individual with college-level life science training to deliberately create a harmful biological agent.

FIGURE 3-5 Respondents’ views on whether sources of information could provide sufficient information for an individual with college-level life science training to deliberately create a harmful biological agent.

NOTE: Based on 1,588 respondents.

SOURCE: NRC/AAAS Survey; data tabulations by staff.

BOX 3-2

Illustrative Respondent Comments About Personal Communication and Scientific Journals Providing Information

“Certain research endeavors, including constructing pathogens from genetic fragments, or ‘resurrecting’ extinct pathogens and providing public access to sequence data from such experiments are of dubious scientific importance and journals, as well as funding agencies, should severely restrict such projects unless especially convincing justification can be provided.”


“Increasing restrictions on publication of dual use research would be the most effective way of decreasing the amount of dual use research that is performed. That would have the effect of decreasing the possible threats from such research (as well as the benefits).”


“If scientific research is restricted significantly, then we lose in kind the ability of the scientific community to respond to biological emergencies and imperatives. If scientific collegiality shifts toward scientific nondisclosure, everyone loses.”



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