FIGURE 1-1 Histogram of population for the United States, based on 2000 census data. The median population density is about 1,000 people/km2. SOURCE: Modified from Pozzi and Small (2005), who place the rural–suburban boundary at 100 people/km2. Reprinted, with permission, from ASPRS (2005). Copyright 2005 by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

FIGURE 1-1 Histogram of population for the United States, based on 2000 census data. The median population density is about 1,000 people/km2. SOURCE: Modified from Pozzi and Small (2005), who place the rural–suburban boundary at 100 people/km2. Reprinted, with permission, from ASPRS (2005). Copyright 2005 by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

BOX 1-1

What Is “Stormwater”?

“Stormwater” is a term that is used widely in both scientific literature and regulatory documents. It is also used frequently throughout this report. Although all of these usages share much in common, there are important differences that benefit from an explicit discussion.

Most broadly, stormwater runoff is the water associated with a rain or snow storm that can be measured in a downstream river, stream, ditch, gutter, or pipe shortly after the precipitation has reached the ground. What constitutes “shortly” depends on the size of the watershed and the efficiency of the drainage system, and a number of techniques exist to precisely separate stormwater runoff from its more languid counterpart, “baseflow.” For small and highly urban watersheds, the interval between rainfall and measured stormwater discharges may be only a few minutes. For watersheds of many tens or hundreds of square miles, the lag between these two components of storm response may be hours or even a day.

From a regulatory perspective, stormwater must pass through some sort of engineered conveyance, be it a gutter, a pipe, or a concrete canal. If it simply runs over the ground surface, or soaks into the soil and soon reemerges as seeps into a nearby stream, it may be water generated by the storm but it is not regulated stormwater.

This report emphasizes the first, more hydrologically oriented definition. However, attention is focused mainly on that component of stormwater that emanates from those parts of a landscape that have been affected in some fashion by human activities (“urban stormwater”). Mostly this includes water that flows over the ground surface and is subsequently collected by natural channels or artificial conveyance systems, but it can also include water that has infiltrated into the ground but nonetheless reaches a stream channel relatively rapidly and that contributes to the increased stream discharge that commonly accompanies almost any rainfall event in a human-disturbed watershed.



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