FIGURE 4-1 Overall goal of the Modified Waters project. Water would be diverted from north of the Tamiami Trail (SR 90), particularly from Water Conservation Area ( WCA) 3A. This water would enter Everglades National Park (ENP) from the northeast and flow through the Shark River Slough system. Several levees (L-67A, L-67C, L-29) and the Tamiami Trail itself currently hinder this flow. Seepage controls in the 8.5-square-mile area (8.5 SMA) would prevent flooding into the developed areas of the eastern Everglades.

FIGURE 4-1 Overall goal of the Modified Waters project. Water would be diverted from north of the Tamiami Trail (SR 90), particularly from Water Conservation Area ( WCA) 3A. This water would enter Everglades National Park (ENP) from the northeast and flow through the Shark River Slough system. Several levees (L-67A, L-67C, L-29) and the Tamiami Trail itself currently hinder this flow. Seepage controls in the 8.5-square-mile area (8.5 SMA) would prevent flooding into the developed areas of the eastern Everglades.

SOURCE: Adapted from USACE and DOI (2008); inset map © International Mapping Associates.

OBJECTIVES OF THE MODIFIED WATER DELIVERIES PROJECT

Roads and canals have long affected water flow into the Shark River Slough in Everglades National Park, but the construction of the water conservation areas (WCAs) in 1963 dramatically reduced the flow to what is now the northeastern portion of the park (see Figure 4-2). The Central and South Florida (C&SF) Project primarily channeled flow through West Shark River Slough, reducing mean flow volumes into Northeast Shark River Slough from 65 to 10 percent of the total flow southward across Tamiami Trail, while frequently flooding the park’s western



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