Appendix J
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

William L. Graf, Chair, is Foundation University Professor and professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His expertise is in fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. Dr. Graf’s research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes, morphology, and ecology, along with contaminant transport and storage in river systems. His present work emphasizes the downstream effects of dams on rivers. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environmental restoration for rivers. Dr. Graf has served as member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; he served on the NRC’s Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative, the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, and the first Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He is also a National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Graf earned a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1974.


Steven R. Beissinger holds the A. Starker Leopold Chair in Wildlife Biology at the University of California at Berkeley in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management where he previously served as department chair. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in conservation biology and population ecology. Dr. Beissinger’s research has been conducted primarily with birds but has also included work with plants, mammals, aquatic invertebrates, and herps. His current work focuses on (1) ecology of endangered or exploited species; (2) modeling population viability; and (3) parental care strategies. Dr. Beissinger has studied wetland birds in the Everglades, California, and internationally. He has worked extensively with federal and state agencies as a member of recovery teams, to develop regional monitoring plans, and as a training instructor. Dr. Beissinger is a Fellow of the London Zoological Society



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Appendix J Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff William L. Graf, Chair, is Foundation University Professor and professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His expertise is in fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. Dr. Graf’s research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes, morphology, and ecology, along with contaminant transport and storage in river systems. His present work emphasizes the downstream effects of dams on rivers. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environ- mental restoration for rivers. Dr. Graf has served as member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; he served on the NRC’s Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative, the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, and the first Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He is also a National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Graf earned a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1974. Steven R. Beissinger holds the A. Starker Leopold Chair in Wildlife Biology at the University of California at Berkeley in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management where he previously served as department chair. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in conservation biology and population ecology. Dr. Beissinger’s research has been conducted primarily with birds but has also included work with plants, mammals, aquatic inverte- brates, and herps. His current work focuses on (1) ecology of endangered or exploited species; (2) modeling population viability; and (3) parental care strate- gies. Dr. Beissinger has studied wetland birds in the Everglades, California, and internationally. He has worked extensively with federal and state agencies as a member of recovery teams, to develop regional monitoring plans, and as a training instructor. Dr. Beissinger is a Fellow of the London Zoological Society 319

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320 Appendix J and the American Ornithologists’ Union and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Audubon Society. He has served on several NRC committees including the U.S. National Committee of the International Union of Biological Sciences, the U.S. National Committee for DIVERSITAS, and the Committee on Scientific Basis for Recovering the Mariana Crow. Dr. Beissinger earned a B.S. and M.S. in zoology at Miami University and a Ph.D. in natural resource ecology at the University of Michigan. Linda K. Blum is research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her current research projects include study of mechanisms controlling bacterial community abundance, productivity, and structure in tidal marsh creeks; impacts of microbial processes on water quality; organic matter accretion in salt marsh sediments; and rhizosphere effects on organic matter decay in anaerobic sediments. Dr. Blum was previously the chair of the NRC’s Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative and a mem- ber of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and the first Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. She earned a B.S. and M.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in soil science from Cornell University. Donald F. Boesch is a professor of marine science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Boesch is a biological ocean- ographer who has conducted research in coastal and continental shelf environ- ments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia, and the East China Sea. He has served as science adviser to many state and federal agencies and regional, national, and international programs. In 1980, Dr. Boesch was appointed as the first executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, where he was also a professor of marine science at Louisiana State University. Earlier he was a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Dr. Boesch is a member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board and served on the Committee to Assess the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Methods of Analysis and Peer Review for Water Resources Planning and the first Com- mittee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He received his B.S. from Tulane University and Ph.D. from the College of William and Mary. Frank W. Davis is professor at the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His research interests are in landscape ecology and conservation planning. Dr. Davis’ ecologi-

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Appendix J 321 cal research has focused on the coupling of ecological pattern and process in California oak woodland and chaparral ecosystems. His research in conserva- tion planning and reserve network design includes a long involvement with the U.S. Gap Analysis Program creating spatial databases to evaluate the conser- vation status of plant communities and wildlife species. Dr. Davis has worked in California on several statewide and regional conservation efforts, directing the California Gap Analysis, as a science team member on the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project, and as the research team leader for the California Legacy Project. A fellow in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program and a Trustee of the Nature Conservancy of California, he increasingly works at the interface between environmental science and policy. Dr. Davis served on the NRC’s Committee on the Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. He earned his Ph.D. in geography from Johns Hopkins University in 1982. Charles T. Driscoll is University Professor in the Department of Civil and Environ- mental Engineering at Syracuse University where he also serves as the director of the Center for Environmental Systems Engineering. His teaching and research interests are in the area of environmental chemistry, biogeochemistry, and envi- ronmental quality modeling. A principal research focus has been the response of forest, aquatic, and coastal ecosystems to disturbance, including air pollution, land use change, and elevated inputs of nutrients and mercury. Dr. Driscoll is currently the principal investigator of the National Science Foundation’s Long Term Ecological Research Network’s project at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. He was a member of the NRC’s Panel on Process of Lake Acidification and the Committee on the Collaborative Large-scale Engi- neering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER). Dr. Driscoll received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Maine and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University. Joan G. Ehrenfeld is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources at Rutgers University and is also the director of the New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute, a federally funded program of water-related research and outreach. Her research is in the area of wetland ecology and eco- systems ecology and focuses on plant-soil interactions. Dr. Ehrenfeld’s current research includes several studies of the interactions of exotic invasive plants and forest soils and studies of nitrogen cycling in forested wetlands affected by urbanization. Her work covers a wide variety of ecosystems in New Jersey, including the Pinelands, the hardwood forests of the northwestern hills, and the red maple swamps of the northeastern Piedmont province. Dr. Ehrenfeld is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of the

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322 Appendix J Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. She received her B.A. in biology from Columbia University, her M.A. in biology from Harvard University, and her Ph.D. in biology from City University of New York. Chris T. Hendrickson is the Duquesne Light Company Professor of Engineering and codirector of the Green Design Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His research, teaching, and consulting are in the general area of engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, system performance, project management, finance, and computer applications. Dr. Hendrickson’s cur- rent research projects include environmental life-cycle assessment methodology development, heavy metal material flow analysis, infrastructure requirements for alternative transportation fuels, and sustainable infrastructure. He has served on several NRC committees including the first Committee on Independent Scien- tific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, the Committee on Assessing the Results of External Independent Reviews for U.S. Department of Energy Projects, and the Committee for Review of the Project Management Practices Employed on the Boston Central Artery (“Big Dig”) Project. Dr. Hendrickson holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University, a master of philosophy degree in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. William P. Horn is a partner in the law firm of Birch, Horton, Bittner and Cherot in Washington, DC. Prior to entering private practice, Mr. Horn served in a variety of congressional and executive posts including as Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, and as Deputy Under Secretary of the Interior with responsibilities for western water rights negotiations, international fishery negotiations, and Alaska programs. He specializes in natural resources law and has expertise in land acquisition and appraisal, wildlife law including the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, National Park concessions, Forest Service matters, recreational permits, and other public land and related regulatory matters. Mr. Horn is a member of the Bar of the District of Columbia, a recipient of the Interior Department’s Outstanding Services Award, and the International Academy of Trial Lawyers Advocacy Award. He earned his J.D. in 1983 from American University. Wayne C. Huber is professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Envi- ronmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Prior to moving to Oregon State in 1991, he served 23 years on the faculty of the Department of Environ- mental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida where he engaged in several studies involving the hydrology and water quality of South Florida

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Appendix J 323 regions. Dr. Huber’s technical interests are principally in the areas of surface hydrology, stormwater management, non-point-source pollution, and transport processes related to water quality. He is one of the original authors of the Envi- ronmental Protection Agency’s Storm-Water Management Model. Dr. Huber is a former member of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and served as chair of the first Committee on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the California Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. David H. Moreau is professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he teaches water resources planning and regional environ- mental planning. His research interests include analysis, planning, financing, and evaluation of water resource and related environmental programs. Dr. Moreau is engaged in water resources planning at the local, state, and national levels. He has chaired or served on several NRC committees, most recently as a member of the Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects and the Committee to Review the Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River Studies. Dr. Moreau serves as chairman of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commis- sion, the state’s regulatory commission for water quality, air quality, and water allocation. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Mississippi State Uni- versity and North Carolina State University, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. Jean-Yves Parlange (NAE) is professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University where his research centers on the application of mathematics to agricultural and environmental problems. His current projects focus on water movement in porous media, solute transport in soils, surface and subsurface hydrology, erosion and sediment transport, and similarity solutions of the nonlinear diffusion equation. The goal of Dr. Parlange’s work is to provide analytical descriptions of complex problems that are accu- rate and can be used for practical management purposes. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006 for fundamental contributions to the formulation of water flow and solute transport in soils and groundwater. Dr. Parlange earned his Ph.D. from Brown University. K. Ramesh Reddy is graduate research professor and chair of the Department of Soil and Water Science at the University of Florida. His research areas include soil quality, ecological indicators, wetlands, and aquatic systems. Dr. Reddy

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324 Appendix J investigates biogeochemical cycling of nutrients (including redox-related pro- cesses) in natural ecosystems—including wetlands, shallow lakes, estuaries, and constructed wetlands—and he develops biogeochemical indicators to evaluate changes in ecosystem functions. He is a member of the U.S. National Committee for Soil Sciences in the National Academy’s Policy and Global Affairs Division. Dr. Reddy earned his Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in 1976. STAFF Stephanie E. Johnson, study director, is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for seven committees, including the Panel to Review the Criti- cal Ecosystem Studies Initiative and the Committee on Advancing Desalination Technology Research. She has also worked on NRC studies on contaminant source remediation, the disposal of coal combustion wastes, and water security. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. David J. Policansky is a scholar and director of the Program in Applied Ecology and Natural Resources in the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Oregon. Dr. Policansky has directed approximately 35 National Research Council studies and his areas of expertise include genetics; evolution; ecology, including fishery biology; natural resource management; and the use of science in policy making. Dorothy K. Weir is a research associate with the Water Science and Technol- ogy Board. She has worked on a number of studies including Water System Security Research and Colorado River Basin Water Management. Ms. Weir has also served as a study director for the Committee on Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research and the Committee on the Review of the Water and Environmental Research Systems Network. She received a B.S. in biology from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee and an M.S. degree in environmental science and policy from John Hopkins University. She joined the NRC in 2003.