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WILLIAM HERBERT HUGGINS
1919–2001

Elected in 1970


“Contributions to electrical and biomedical engineering through radar and systems research, publications, and pedagogical innovation.”


BY WILSON J. RUGH AND DORIS R. ENTWISLE

SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY


WILLIAM HERBERT HUGGINS, a professor of electrical engineering at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) from 1954 to 1984, died August 11, 2001, at the age of 82. Born January 11, 1919, in Rupert, Idaho, he received a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering from Oregon State College in 1941 and 1942, respectively. In 1944, he joined the Radio Research Laboratory at Harvard University, and from 1946 to 1954 he was affiliated with the Air Force Cambridge Research Center. From 1949 to 1954 he was also a research associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); he received an Sc.D. from MIT in 1953. In 1954, he joined the faculty of JHU, where he remained until he retired as Westinghouse Professor Emeritus in 1984.

Huggins received the IEEE Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Paper Award in 1948 and the U.S. Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service in 1954. He also received several teaching awards, including the IEEE Education Award in 1966, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1970.

Huggins’s early work and publications were on a theory of hearing, electrical-circuit theory, and electronics. His methodical development of an algebraic theory of signal analysis, and a series of technical reports and papers published, with his students, in the 1950s and early 1960s, influenced



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