Appendixes



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Appendixes 

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A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Keith R. Criddle is the Ted Stevens Distinguished Professor of Marine Policy in the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Juneau Center for Fisheries and Ocean Science. Dr. Criddle earned his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis, in 1989. Dr. Criddle’s research focuses on the intersection between the natural sciences and economics, especially the management of living resources. Dr. Criddle’s research has explored topics ranging from the economic consequences of alternative management regimes for the governance of commercial, sport, and sub­ sistence fisheries to the bioeconomic effects of climate change in north Pacific fisheries to the evolution of the structure of the Chilean salmon aquaculture industry in response to requirements for traceability and assurance. He has served on the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council Scientific and Statistical Committee since 1993 and as an associate editor of Marine Resource Economics from 1993 to 2003, and Dr. Criddle was a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on the Introduction of Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas, and Committee on the Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process. He is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Anthony F. Amos is a research fellow in the Marine Science Institute at the University of Texas. He was educated at the Glyn Technology School in Surrey, England. His oceanographic career has spanned 44 years with 

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 TACKLING MARINE DEBRIS IN THE ST CENTURY research expeditions to all the world’s oceans and many of its seas, includ­ ing 35 cruises to the Antarctic and five to the Arctic. His current research interests in Texas include studies of several aspects of nearshore and bay and estuarine processes (circulation, currents, hydrography, and tides). He has also conducted a long­term study of the barrier island beaches, including marine debris surveys on these beaches. Mr. Amos is the direc­ tor of the Animal Rehabilitation Keep (ARK), which he founded in 1982. ARK rescues, rehabilitates, and releases back to the wild injured and sick sea turtles and large aquatic birds, many of which are adversely affected by marine debris and fishing gear. He is a member of the New York Academy of Science, the American Geophysical Union, the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network, and the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network. He is also an Honorary Lifetime Member of the Texas Marine Educators Association and has served as vice­chair of the National Sci­ ence Foundation’s Research Vessel Technical Enhancement Committee. He is a holder of the U.S. Antarctic Service Medal. He served on the NRC’s Committee on Shipborne Waste and on various committees of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Minerals Management Service, and others regarding the marine debris problem. Paula Carroll is a retired captain in the U.S. Coast Guard. She earned a B.S. in biology. She began her Coast Guard career in 1977. Her first assignment in the marine safety field was as Assistant Chief of the Port Operations Department at Marine Safety Office Puget Sound in Seattle. Follow­on assignments included Chief of the Waterways Management Section of the Eighth District Aids to Navigation Branch in New Orleans. In 1996, Capt. Carroll assumed command of Vessel Traffic Service Houston/Galveston for three years. From 1999 until her retirement in June 2006, she was stationed on the Fourteenth District staff in Honolulu, first as Chief of the Marine Response Branch and then ultimately as Chief of Prevention. She developed and implemented a model framework with Hawaii Sea Grant; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; The Ocean Con­ servancy; the U.S. Department of Defense; other federal, state, and local agencies; and nongovernmental organizations to address the Fourteenth District derelict fishing gear and marine debris impacts on coral reefs and on endangered monk seal and turtle populations. Efforts resulted in the recovery of over 180 tons of marine debris and incalculable improvement of affected marine habitat. James M. Coe recently retired as the deputy science and research direc­ tor from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Mr. Coe has a bachelors degree in zoology from the University of California, Santa Barbara; a masters degree in

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 APPENDIX A marine affairs from the University of Washington; and is a Ph.D. candi­ date in fisheries science at the University of Washington. He may be best known for his contributions to the major reduction in the incidental kill of dolphins in tuna purse seining during the 1970s; for his leadership in the movement to identify and control marine debris pollution during the mid­ 1980s to mid­1990s; for his role in the investigation and ultimate interna­ tional ban on high seas large­scale driftnet fishing in the mid­1990s; and, finally, for his guidance and steady management of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research programs supporting marine resource management in Alaska since the late 1990s. Today, he is still con­ sidered one of the world’s experts on the marine debris issue. Mr. Coe has authored more than 40 technical papers, reports, and guidelines, includ­ ing a global review on marine debris. Mr. Coe retired from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in January of 2008. Mary J. Donohue is a program specialist at the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in organismal and population biology and a B.A. degree in aquatic biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Donohue has been working on the issue of marine debris since 1999. Formerly with the National Oceanic and Atmo­ spheric Administration, she administered, coordinated, and served as Chief Scientist on the first systematic expeditions to document, study, and remove marine debris from the coral reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Her research has been published in scientific journals, including the Marine Pollution Bulletin, the Journal of Experimental Biology, and the Journal of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology. She has spoken on marine debris in the United States, Japan, Canada, and the United Kingdom at international conferences, symposia, and as an invited university and public seminar speaker. Judith Hill Harris serves as the Director of Transportation for the City of Portland, Maine. Her areas of responsibility include policy development and regulatory compliance for maritime, surface, and aviation transporta­ tion systems. Before her current position, she was the manager of fishing programs and maritime regulation for the City of Portland. She monitored not only fishing regulations but all maritime environmental issues, includ­ ing ballast water, aquatic nuisance species, and air emissions. Earlier in her career, Ms. Harris worked for Saltwater Farm, a subsidiary of International Oceanographic Corporation, which was the nation’s oldest and largest shipper of lobsters direct to consumers. During her tenure with Saltwater Farm, she became involved in all aspects of the lobster industry. Ms. Harris has worked as an advocate for fishermen and served on right whale ship

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0 TACKLING MARINE DEBRIS IN THE ST CENTURY strike and take reduction groups. She was a member of the State of Maine’s Homeland Security Planning team and is the former chair of the Port of Portland’s Maritime Disaster Task Force and the Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety Committee. Ms. Harris is the author or editor of a number of publications on fisheries and environmental issues. She is a current member of the Marine Board. Kiho Kim is an associate professor and the chair of the Department of Environmental Science at American University. He received his Ph.D. in 1996 at the University of Buffalo, studying the ecology of tropical coral reefs, and did his postdoctoral work at Cornell University. His current research focuses on understanding the role of diseases in coral population ecology and the synergistic effects of environmental factors, such as nutri­ ent pollution and ocean warming, in the decline of coral reefs. Dr. Kim has participated in working groups examining the ecology of diseases at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, has worked with the British Council in promoting international networking for young scientists, and is currently an advisor to the Coral Disease Working Group of the World Bank. He is a current member of the Ocean Studies Board. Tony MacDonald is currently the director of the Urban Coast Institute at Monmouth University, West Long Branch, New Jersey. He earned a B.A. from Middlebury College and a J.D. from Fordham University. Mr. MacDonald was previously the executive director of the Coastal States Organization from 1998 to 2005. Prior to joining the Coastal States Orga­ nization, he was the special counsel and director of environmental affairs at the American Association of Port Authorities, where he represented the International Association of Ports and Harbors at the International Maritime Organization on negotiations on the London Convention. He has also practiced law with a private firm in Washington, D.C., working on environmental and legislative issues, and served as the Washington, D.C. environmental legislative representative for the Mayor of the City of New York. He specializes in environment, coastal, marine, and natural resources law and policy and federal, state, and local government affairs. Kathy Metcalf is the Director of Maritime Affairs for the Chamber of Shipping of America, a maritime trade association which represents a significant number of U.S.­based companies that own, operate, or charter oceangoing tankers, container ships, and other merchant vessels engaged in both the domestic and international trades. She has held this posi­ tion since 1997 and, in her capacity, represents maritime interests before Congress, federal and state agencies, and in international forums. This includes attending numerous sessions of the International Maritime Orga­

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 APPENDIX A nization as the American shipowner representative on the U.S. delega­ tion to the Marine Environment Protection Committee and the Maritime Safety Committee. Ms. Metcalf earned a B.S. in marine transportation and nautical sciences in 1978 from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and a J.D. in 1988 from the Delaware Law School. Prior to coming to the Chamber of Shipping, she served in various positions in the energy industry including deck officer aboard large oceangoing tankers, marine safety and environmental director, corporate regulatory and compliance manager, and state government affairs manager. Alison Rieser is the Dai Ho Chun Distinguished Chair in Arts and Sci­ ences, professor in the Department of Geography, and director of the Graduate Ocean Policy Certificate Program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She earned an LL.M. from Yale Law School, a J.D. cum laude from the George Washington University, and a B.S. in human ecology from Cornell University. Ms. Rieser is a specialist in marine conservation law, the role of property rights regimes in marine resource governance, and ecosystem­based approaches to fisheries management. She is currently investigating the governance structure of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument. She was a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation from 1999 to 2002 and was professor of ocean and coastal law and Director of the Marine Law Institute at the University of Maine’s School of Law from 1988 to 2006. Ms. Rieser has served on three previ­ ous NRC committees—the Committee for Review of the National Marine Fisheries Service: Use of Science and Data in Management and Litigation, the Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas, and the Committee on Marine Area Governance and Management. Nina M. Young is the deputy director of external affairs at the Consor­ tium for Oceanographic Research and Education. She is also the president of Ocean Research Conservation and Solutions Consulting. Ms. Young earned a B.A. in marine science from the Kutztown University of Penn­ sylvania and an M.S. in physiology (with a minor in zoology and veteri­ nary science) from the University of Florida. In the past, she served as the director for the Marine Wildlife Conservation Program at The Ocean Conservancy. She participated in two marine debris removal cruises and led The Ocean Conservancy’s effort to determine the source of debris col­ lected from the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. STAFF Susan Park is a program officer with the Ocean Studies Board. She received her Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Delaware in

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 TACKLING MARINE DEBRIS IN THE ST CENTURY 2004. Susan was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Policy Fellow with the Ocean Studies Board in 2002 and joined the staff in 2006. She has worked on several reports with the National Academies, including Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods, Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems, A Review of the Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy, and Geneti- cally Engineered Organisms, Wildlife, and Habitat: A Workshop Summary. Prior to joining the Ocean Studies Board, Susan spent time working on aquatic invasive species management with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management and the Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel. Jodi Bostrom is an associate program officer with the Ocean Studies Board. She earned an M.S. in environmental science from American Uni­ versity in 2006 and a B.S. in zoology from the University of Wisconsin­ Madison in 1998. Since starting with the Ocean Studies Board in May 1999, Jodi has worked on several studies pertaining to coastal restoration, fisheries, marine mammals, nutrient overenrichment, ocean exploration, and capacity building.