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53 Appendix B Committee on Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Member Biographies Christopher B. Field – Chair Carnegie Institution for Science Christopher B. Field is the founding director of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, professor of biological sciences at Stanford University, and faculty director of Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. For most of the last two decades Dr. Field has fostered the emergence of global ecology. His research emphasizes ecological contributions across the range of Earthscience disciplines. Dr. Field and his colleagues have developed diverse approaches to quantifying large-scale ecosystem processes, using satellites, atmospheric data, models, and census data. They have explored local and global patterns of climate change impacts, vegetation-climate feedbacks, carbon cycle dynamics, primary production, forest management, and fire. For more than a decade, Dr. Field has led major experiments on grassland responses to global change, experiments that integrate approaches from molecular biology to remote sensing at the ecosystem-scale. His activities in building the culture of global ecology include service on many national and international committees, including committees of the National Research Council, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, and the Earth System Science Partnership. Dr. Field was a coordinating lead author for the fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is a fellow of the ESA Aldo Leopold Leadership Program and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of Ecology, Ecological Applications, Ecosystems, Global Change Biology, and PNAS. Dr. Field received his Ph.D. from Stanford in 1981 and has been at the Carnegie Institution since 1984. His recent priorities include high performance "green" laboratories, integrity in the use of science by governments, local efforts to reduce carbon emissions, ecological impacts of biofuels, and the future of scientific publishing. Donald F. Boesch University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Donald F. Boesch is a professor of marine science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. From June 2002 through October 2003 Dr. Boesch also served as interim vice chancellor for academic affairs of the University System of Maryland. In 1980 he became the first executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, where he was also a professor of marine science at Louisiana State University. He assumed his present position in Maryland in 1990. Dr. Boesch is a biological oceanographer who has conducted research in coastal and continental-shelf environments along the Atlantic Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico, eastern Australia, and the East China Sea. He has published two books and more than 85 papers on marine benthos, estuaries, wetlands, continental shelves, oil pollution, nutrient overenrichment, environmental assessment and monitoring, and science policy. His research presently focuses on the use of science in ecosystem management. Dr. Boesch is active in extending knowledge to environmental and resource management at regional, national and

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54 international levels. He has served as science adviser to many state and federal agencies and regional, national, and international programs. He has chaired numerous committees and scientific assessment teams that have produced reports on a wide variety of coastal environmental issues. A native of New Orleans, Don Boesch received his B.S. from Tulane University and Ph.D. from the College of William and Mary. He was a Fulbright postdoctoral fellow at the University of Queensland and subsequently served on the faculty of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. F. Stuart "Terry" Chapin III University of Alaska, Fairbanks F. Stuart "Terry" Chapin III is a professor of ecology in the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. Over the past 15 years Dr. Chapin has participated in several international commissions focused on the environment and climate, including the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He was the first Alaskan elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Among the honors he has received are the Kempe Award for Distinguished Ecologist in 1996 and the Usabelli Award for the top researcher in all fields from the University of Alaska in 2000. Dr. Chapin received his Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University in 1973. Peter H. Gleick Pacific Institute Peter H. Gleick is the president of the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California, which he cofounded in 1987 and where he works on issues related to the environment, economic development, and international security, with a focus on global freshwater challenges. Among the issues he has addressed are conflicts over water resources, the impacts of climate change on water resources, the human right to water, and the problems of the billions of people without safe, affordable, and reliable water and sanitation. Dr. Gleick received a B.S. from Yale University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Gleick is the author of the biennial series on the state of the world's water, called The World's Water, published by Island Press, Washington, D.C., regularly provides testimony to the U.S. Congress and state legislatures, and has published many scientific articles. He served as lead author of the water sector report of the U.S. National Assessment of the impacts of climatic change and variability and as a reviewer for several chapters in the IPCC reports. In 2003 he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship for his work on water resources and in 2006 he was elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and to Membership in the National Academy of Sciences. Anthony C. Janetos University of Maryland Anthony C. Janetos is director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute at the University of Maryland. Dr. Janetos previously served as vice president of the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment in Washington, D.C., where he directed the center's Global Change Program. He has written and spoken widely to policy, business, and scientific

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55 audiences on the need for scientific input and scientific assessment in the policy-making process and about the need to understand the scientific, environmental, economic, and policy linkages among the major global environmental issues. Dr. Janetos has served on several national and international study teams, including working as a cochair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. He also was an author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Special Report on Land-Use Change and Forestry, the Global Biodiversity Assessment, and a coordinating lead author in the recently published Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He currently serves as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. Dr. Janetos graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University. Jane Lubchenco Oregon State University Jane Lubchenco is the Wayne and Gladys Valley Professor of Marine Biology and Distinguished Professor of Zoology at Oregon State University. Dr. Lubchenco is an environmental scientist and marine ecologist who is actively engaged in teaching, research, synthesis, and communication of scientific knowledge. Her expertise includes interactions between humans and the environment: biodiversity, climate change, sustainability science, ecosystem services, marine reserves, coastal marine ecosystems, the state of the oceans, and the state of the planet. She leads an interdisciplinary team of scientists who study the marine ecosystem off the west coast of the United States. This PISCO team is learning how the ecosystem works, how it is changing and how humans can modify their actions to ensure continued benefit from ocean ecosystems. She is a former president of the International Council for Science and a former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Ecological Society of America. She was a presidential appointee to two terms on the National Science Board which advises the President and Congress and oversees the National Science Foundation. She often testifies before Congress, addresses the United Nations, and provides scientific advice to the White House, federal and international agencies, nongovernmental organizations, religious leaders, and leaders of business and industry. In 1996, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Philosophical Society, Royal Society, and the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World. Dr. Lubchenco has received numerous awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship, a Pew Fellowship, and the 2005 American Association for the Advancement of Science's Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology. She graduated from Colorado College, received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in marine ecology, taught at Harvard for two years, and has been on the faculty at Oregon State University since 1978. Jonathan T. Overpeck University of Arizona Jonathan T. Overpeck is a professor of geosciences and director at the Institute for the Study of Planet Earth at the University of Arizona. His specialty areas are climate dynamics, including paleoclimatology, climate and ecosystem interaction, and climate assessment and decision support. Dr. Overpeck has written over 100 publications on climate and ecosystem variability,

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56 and was founding cochair of both international and U.S. CLIVAR-PAGES working groups. He is the chair of the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science Committee, and a member of the NOAA Climate Working Group. Dr. Overpeck has been awarded the U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal, as well as the Walter Orr Roberts Award of the American Meteorological Society for his interdisciplinary research. He is also a coordinating lead author for the ongoing Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment. Most recently Dr. Overpeck was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to investigate paleoenvironmental perspectives on the future. He has a Ph.D. from Brown University. Camille Parmesan University of Texas Camille Parmesan is associate professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas. Dr. Parmesan's early research focused on multiple aspects of population biology, including the ecology, evolution and behaviors of insect-plant interactions. For the past several years the focus of her work has been on current impacts of climate change on wildlife in the 20th century. Her work on butterfly range shifts has been highlighted in many scientific and popular press reports, such as in Science, Science News, New York Times, London Times, National Public Radio, and the recent BBC film series State of the Planet with David Attenborough. The intensification of global warming as an international issue led her into the interface of policy and science. Dr. Parmesan has given seminars for the White House, government agencies, and NGOs. As a lead author she was involved in multiple aspects of the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Texas in 1995. Terry L. Root Stanford University Terry L. Root is a senior fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment, and professor by courtesy in the Biology Department at Stanford University. Dr. Root's research focuses on how wild animals and plants have responded over the last century when the global average temperature increased ~0.8oC and what the future ecological consequences will be for wild species as the globe continues to warm rapidly. She and coworkers have also used studies of species to show that humans are indeed causing a large portion of the increase in local and regional temperatures. As the planet continues to warm at an escalating rate more and more species will be at risk of extinction. Dr. Root’s current work is focusing on how to avert as many extinctions as possible. She is working to help communicate information about climate change to decision makers and the general public. She was a lead author in both the third and fourth assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group 2. In 2007 the IPCC shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Vice President Gore. In 1990 she received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation and in 1992 was selected as a Pew scholar in Conservation and the Environment and Aldo Leopold leadership fellow in 1999. She received her bachelors degree in mathematics and statistics at the University of New Mexico, her masters degree in biology at the University of Colorado in 1982, and her Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University in 1987. She has served on the National Research Council Committee on Environmental Indicators and Pierce’s Disease in Vineyards of California

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57 Steven W. Running University of Montana Steven W. Running is trained as a terrestrial ecologist, receiving B.S. (1972) and M.S. (1973) degrees from Oregon State University and a Ph.D. (1979) in forest ecology from Colorado State University. Since 1979 he has been with the University of Montana, Missoula, where he is a University Regents Professor of Ecology. His primary research interest is the development of global and regional ecosystem biogeochemical models by integration of remote sensing with climatology and terrestrial ecology. He is a team member for the NASA Earth Observing System, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and he is responsible for the EOS global terrestrial net primary production and evaporative index datasets. He has published over 240 scientific articles. Dr. Running has recently served on the standing Committee for Earth Studies of the National Research Council and on the federal Interagency Carbon Cycle Science Committee. He is a cochair of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model Land Working Group, a member of the International Geosphere- Biosphere Program Executive Committee, and the World Climate Research Program, Global Terrestrial Observing System. Dr. Running shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 as a chapter lead author for the Fourth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is an elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and is designated a highly cited researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information. Stephen H. Schneider Stanford University Stephen H. Schneider is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, a senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and professor by courtesy in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford. In 1975 he founded the interdisciplinary journal, Climatic Change, and continues to serve as its editor. Dr. Schneider’s current global change research interests include climatic change, global warming, food and climate and other environmental science public policy issues, ecological and economic implications of climatic change, integrated assessment of global change, climatic modeling of paleoclimates and of human impacts on climate (carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and environmental consequences of nuclear war, for example). He is also interested in advancing public understanding of science and in improving formal environmental education in primary and secondary schools. He was honored in 1992 with a MacArthur Fellowship for his ability to integrate and interpret the results of global climate research through public lectures, seminars, classroom teaching, environmental assessment committees, media appearances, congressional testimony, and research collaboration with colleagues. He has served as a consultant to federal agencies and White House staff in the Nixon, Carter, Reagan, Bush Sr., Clinton, and Bush Jr. administrations. He received, in 1991, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Westinghouse Award for Public Understanding of Science and Technology for furthering public understanding of environmental science and its implications for public policy. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2002. Dr. Schneider received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and plasma physics from Columbia University in 1971.

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