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FIGURE 3.7 The percentage of regional endemics vs. median body size of species in each region (open diamonds) and species richness in each region (filled squares) for reef stomatopods. Residual analyses show no difference in and statistical results are similar for transformed and untransformed data; untransformed data are shown here.

FIGURE 3.7 The percentage of regional endemics vs. median body size of species in each region (open diamonds) and species richness in each region (filled squares) for reef stomatopods. Residual analyses show no difference in and statistical results are similar for transformed and untransformed data; untransformed data are shown here.

environments. Because of terrestrial runoff, continental regions and high islands are expected to have higher nearshore productivity than low oceanic islands. Analysis of maximal species’ body sizes on continental and high vs. low island environments shows, as above, that endemism is consistently associated with small body size (F = 39.27, df = 157, P < 0.001, type 3 ANOVA tests of fixed effects for regional endemism, terrain height, and region, log-transformed data; analysis using species median body size yields the same result). Terrain height is not consistently related to body size across all six regions, probably because of the large species scattered throughout the IOC, IO, and IAA (type 3 ANOVA of fixed effects as above, P > 0.05; for number of species >40 mm and <40 mm on continental/high vs. low islands across the region, x2 = 15.3, df = 9, P = 0.08). However, a previous study of reef stomatopods showed that body size of individual populations within each of four species complexes of reef stomatopods declines significantly from the IAA toward the CP and that populations on high islands reach significantly larger body sizes than those inhabiting atolls in these regions (Reaka-Kudla, 2000). Guided by the previous study, we analyzed maximal and median body sizes of species assemblages from high vs. low islands from the West Central Pacific and CP. High islands support species of significantly larger body size than low islands in these regions (F = 4.79, df = 40, P = 0.03; type 3 ANOVA of fixed effects for region, island height, and regional endemism, log-transformed data; analysis of median body size of species yields a similar result).



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