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islands, because many exotics have become naturalized, whereas few native species have gone extinct (Sax and Gaines, 2006).

Increases in plant richness show several distinct patterns. First, comparisons between mainlands and islands and among island types (landbridge versus oceanic) show repeatable quantitative differences; mainland areas have increased in plant species richness least, land-bridge islands have increased more, and oceanic islands have increased the most. For example, counties in California have increased on average by 17%, the California Channel Islands have increased by 44%, and oceanic islands have increased by 104% in richness (Sax and Gaines, 2006). Second, increases in richness on some islands have been sufficiently large that these isolated systems now approximate the richness of continental areas. For example, the addition of naturalized plants to Hawaii has pushed its net plant richness up to levels typical for an area of equal size in mainland Mexico (Sax and Gaines, 2006). Third, the average increase in richness observed across oceanic islands is highly regular, with most islands showing a strikingly consistent doubling in net plant richness (Sax et al., 2002).

The doubling in plant richness on oceanic islands is due to a tightly correlated one-to-one relationship between native and naturalized plant species, with 96% of the variation in naturalized plant richness explained solely by native plant richness (Fig. 5.2). Other island characteristics indi-

FIGURE 5.2 Native and naturalized plant richness are highly correlated across oceanic islands. The log number of extant native plant species explains 96% of the variation in the log number of naturalized plant species. See Appendix Table 5A.1 for a list of islands and richness values.

FIGURE 5.2 Native and naturalized plant richness are highly correlated across oceanic islands. The log number of extant native plant species explains 96% of the variation in the log number of naturalized plant species. See Appendix Table 5A.1 for a list of islands and richness values.



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