effects. However, the effects are not disabling and are transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure.

AEGL-2 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience irreversible or other serious, long-lasting adverse health effects or an impaired ability to escape.

AEGL-3 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience life-threatening health effects or death.


Airborne concentrations below the AEGL-1 represent exposure levels that could produce mild and progressively increasing but transient and nondisabling odor, taste, and sensory irritation or certain asymptomatic, nonsensory effects. With increasing airborne concentrations above each AEGL, there is a progressive increase in the likelihood of occurrence and the severity of effects described for each corresponding AEGL. Although the AEGLs represent threshold levels for the general public, including susceptible subpopulations, such as infants, children, the elderly, persons with asthma, and those with other illnesses, it is recognized that individuals, subject to idiosyncratic responses, could experience the effects described at concentrations below the corresponding AEGL.

SUMMARY

Pure carbon disulfide (CS2) is a colorless, mobile, refractive liquid with a sweetish aromatic odor similar to chloroform. Commercial and reagent grade products are yellowish with an unpleasant, repulsive odor of decaying radish or overcooked cauliflower. Due to its high volatility, low flash point, low autoignition temperature, and wide range of explosive limits in air, CS2 poses an acute fire and explosion hazard. The most important industrial use of CS2 has been in the manufacture of regenerated cellulose rayon by the viscose process.

A wide range of odor thresholds from 0.0243 mg/m3 to 23.1 mg/m3 (0.0078 to 7.4 ppm) for CS2 were reported. Amoore and Hautala (1983) reported a geometric mean air odor threshold of 0.11 ppm (standard error [SD], 0.058 ppm) Leonardos et al. (1969) determined an odor recognition threshold of 0.21 ppm. AIHA (1997), in a critical overview of odor thresholds for chemicals, reported a range of all referenced values from 0.016 to 0.42 ppm. No geometric mean and no “range of acceptable values” for CS2 were presented, and the use of the 0.21 ppm threshold was rejected because it represented a 100% recognition concentration. Few data are available with respect to concentrations of CS2 causing odor annoyance. In one controlled human study (Lehmann 1894), 180-240 ppm caused “moderate odor annoyance,” and there were no complaints to exposures at 10-20 ppm in a toxicokinetic study (Rosier et al. 1987).

The database is not sufficient to calculate a level of distinct odor awareness (LOA). It also must be taken into account that strong smelling decomposi-



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