Appendix D
Speaker Biographies

Robert F. Breiman, M.D., is currently head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Global Disease Detection Division and director of the International Emerging Infections Program in Nairobi, Kenya. He oversees population-based surveillance for infectious disease syndromes, which includes a component to study veterinary–human health interfaces, and has led investigations of outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in Kenya, avian influenza in Nigeria, and Chikungunya virus in Lamu, Kenya, and Comoros Islands. Dr. Breiman is the principal investigator on a GAVI-funded investigation of the efficacy of a rotavirus vaccine for prevention of severe diarrhea in infants in western Kenya and a project funded by The Bill and Melinda Gates foundation on the burden of diarrheal disease in children. Before moving to Kenya, Dr. Breiman worked in Dhaka, Bangladesh at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), where he led prospective investigations on pneumonia, tuberculosis, cholera, typhoid, shigella, rotavirus and other enteric diseases, and encephalitis. Dr. Breiman was the team leader for World Health Organization (WHO) teams investigating Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in China (2003). He also led investigations of outbreaks of Nipah encephalitis in Bangladesh. He also worked on field studies of vaccines to prevent influenza, rotavirus, and cholera. Dr. Breiman served as director of the U.S. National Vaccine Program Office (1995–2000) and is a former chief of the Epidemiology Section of the Respiratory Diseases Branch at CDC, where he led work on the epidemiology of a variety of causes of pneumonia, with particular focus on pneumococcal and Legionnaires’ disease. He served as the team leader of the investigation of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in the southwestern United States (1993).



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Appendix D Speaker Biographies Robert F. Breiman, M.D., is currently head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Global Disease Detection Division and director of the International Emerging Infections Program in Nairobi, Kenya. He oversees population-based surveillance for infectious disease syndromes, which includes a component to study veterinary–human health interfaces, and has led investigations of outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in Kenya, avian influenza in Nigeria, and Chikungunya virus in Lamu, Kenya, and Comoros Islands. Dr. Breiman is the principal investigator on a GAVI-funded investiga- tion of the efficacy of a rotavirus vaccine for prevention of severe diarrhea in infants in western Kenya and a project funded by The Bill and Melinda Gates foundation on the burden of diarrheal disease in children. Before mov- ing to Kenya, Dr. Breiman worked in Dhaka, Bangladesh at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), where he led prospective investigations on pneumonia, tuberculosis, cholera, typhoid, shigella, rotavirus and other enteric diseases, and encephalitis. Dr. Breiman was the team leader for World Health Organization (WHO) teams inves- tigating Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in China (2003). He also led investigations of outbreaks of Nipah encephalitis in Bangladesh. He also worked on field studies of vaccines to prevent influenza, rotavirus, and cholera. Dr. Breiman served as director of the U.S. National Vaccine Program Office (1995–2000) and is a former chief of the Epidemiology Section of the Respiratory Diseases Branch at CDC, where he led work on the epidemiology of a variety of causes of pneumonia, with particular focus on pneumococcal and Legionnaires’ disease. He served as the team leader of the investigation of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in the southwestern United States (1993). 

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 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES Ilaria Capua, D.V.M., Ph.D., is currently head of the Virology Department at Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Padova, Italy, and head of the National, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organiza- tion (FAO), and World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) Reference Laboratories for avian influenza (AI) and Newcastle disease. She has been involved in managing several AI outbreaks on a global scale, and in par- ticular, her group has supported African and Middle Eastern countries affected by the H5N1 crisis. She is currently coordinating two European Union– (EU–) funded projects. She is a partner in an additional four EU- funded projects and is a Work Package leader in the EU Network of Excel- lence for Epizootic Disease Diagnosis and Control, EPIZONE. Dr. Capua , is currently the chair of OFFLU, the joint OIE-FAO veterinary network of expertise on avian influenza. In 2006, she ignited an international debate on sharing genetic information and launched the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data, endorsed by 70 medical and veterinary virologists and 6 Nobel laureates. In 2008, Dr. Capua was among the winners of the Scientific American 0 prize for leadership in policy for promoting sharing of information at an international level. Dennis Carroll, Ph.D., is currently director of the U.S. Agency for Inter- national Development’s (USAID’s) Avian and Pandemic Influenza Prepared- ness and Response Unit. Dr. Carroll was initially detailed to USAID from the U.S. CDC as a senior public health advisor in 1991. In 1995, he became the Agency’s senior infectious diseases advisor and was responsible for the Agency’s programs in malaria, tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, and emerging infectious diseases. He officially left CDC and joined USAID in 2005, when he assumed responsibility as direc- tor of the API Unit. Dr. Carroll has a doctorate in Biomedical Research, with a special focus in Tropical Infectious Diseases, from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was a research scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York, where he studied the molecular mechanics of viral infection. Dr. Carroll has received a number of performance awards from both CDC and USAID, including the 2006 USAID Science and Tech- nology Award for his work on malaria and avian influenza, and the 2008 Administrators’ Management Innovation Award for his management of the Agency’s API program. Peter Cowen, D.V.M., Ph.D., has served in the North Carolina State Uni- versity College of Veterinary Medicine’s department of Population Health and Pathobiology as an assistant and associate professor of epidemiology/ public health since 1985. He directed the school’s WHO/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Veterinary Public Health Consulting Center for graduate and residency programs in veterinary public health from 1990

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 APPENDIX D to 1997. He received a B.A. in Sociology from Beloit College. His interests later shifted to veterinary medicine, resulting in his decision to attend the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, for his D.V.M. With a growing appreciation for the international needs of the profession, he returned to the United States to obtain both an M.P.V.M. and Ph.D. from the University of Califor- nia, Davis in 1980 and 1986 respectively, under the direction of Dr. Calvin W. Schwabe, former chair of the WHO’s first expert council on veterinary public health and founder of the first postgraduate training program in epidemiology housed in a veterinary college. In 1998–1999 he worked as a visiting epidemiologist with the Office of Public Health and Science, Food Safety and Inspection Service, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A project of particular importance to Dr. Cowen since 1996 is his work as moderator for ProMED-mail, an Internet emerging disease surveillance system recognized globally as a major communication avenue for the public health profession. In 2007, Dr. Cowen was inducted as an honorary Dip- lomate of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society. Nancy Cox, Ph.D., is director of the U.S. CDC Influenza Division and direc- tor of the CDC’s WHO Collaborating Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Control of Influenza. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Bacteriology from Iowa State University. Dr. Cox was then awarded a Marshall Scholar- ship to study at the University of Cambridge, where she earned a doctoral degree in Virology, with a dissertation that focused on influenza virus/host interactions. Dr. Cox began her career as a postdoctoral fellow, first at the University of Maryland–Baltimore County and subsequently at the CDC, where she continued her work on influenza viruses. She was selected as the chief of the Molecular Genetics Section of the Influenza Branch in 1983, chief of the Influenza Branch in 1992, and director of the Influenza Division in 2006. She frequently serves as a WHO temporary advisor for vaccine strain selection and expansion of the WHO’s global influenza network. Since 1988 she has served on the International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses, Orthomyxovirus Subcommittee both as a member and chair (1993–1999). She also co-chaired the U.S. Interagency Group on Influenza Pandemic Preparedness from 1993 to 1995, which began the process of writing a national response plan for the next influenza pandemic. She has also served on the organizing committee for many international influenza meetings, including Options for the Control of Influenza III, IV, V. She chaired the organizing committee for Options for the Control of Influenza VI, which was held in 2007. In her capacity as WHO Collaborating Center director, she has organized and participated in numerous national and international training courses on influenza epidemiology, isolation, and identification. Dr. Cox is the recipient of many scientific and achievement awards, including recognition by Time and Newsweek magazines for The

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 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES Time 100: The People Who Shape Our World (2006) and Giving Back (2006) awards, respectively; the Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service (2006); and Federal Employee of the Year (2006). She was also coauthor of the Lancet Paper of the Year (2006). She is an editor for Lancet Infectious Diseases and is the author and coauthor of more than 195 research articles, reviews, and book chapters. Stéphane de La Rocque, D.V.M., Ph.D., graduated from the veterinary school of Lyon, France. He has over 15 years of experience in the field of vector ecology, spatial epidemiology, and remote sensing. He started his study of the epidemiology of hemoparasites in the northern part of South America, then spent nearly 10 years in West Africa (Burkina Faso, Senegal) working primarily on tsetse flies and their control, then bluetongue, Rift Valley fever, and West Nile. During the outbreaks of bluetongue and West Nile in France, he was leading a research team on arboviruses for the French Agricultural Centre for International Development (CIRAD). Dr. de La Rocque was part of the team who initiated the so-called Emerging Diseases in a changing European Environment (EDEN) project, a project spanning 25 countries that was supported by the European Commission to study environmental changes and the emergence of diseases. He was the general coordinator of EDEN for 3 years before joining FAO in Rome in 2006. In the Animal Health Division of FAO, he heads the group in charge of the OIE-WHO-FAO Global Early Warning System (GLEWS) project. Dr. de La Rocque is a laureate of the French National Academy of Medi- cine, the French Entomological Society and the Society of Geomatics. Joshua Dein, V.M.D., M.S., currently serves as the animal welfare officer and the captive wildlife specialist at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI. He is also the prin- cipal investigator for the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) Wildlife Disease Information Node, which includes development of a national wildlife disease database system. Dr. Dein has also been active in other informatics collaborations aimed at integrating multidisciplinary health data and information, such as the Canary Database and WildPro Multimedia. Dr. Dein holds a V.M.D. and M.S. in Pathology from the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Ornithology/ Entomology from the University of Delaware. He is actively involved in a number of national and international projects involving wildlife disease informatics, development of disease surveillance systems, and integration of these systems with those for public and livestock health. Tracy S. DuVernoy, D.V.M., M.P.H., Dipl. ACVPM, is chief of the Com- munications Center for the U.S. Department of Defense-Global Emerging

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 APPENDIX D Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS), where she plans and directs activities related to the surveillance of various types of influ- enza, and develops and maintains lines of communication and coordination with other organizations and agencies also dealing with influenza. She is responsible for monitoring daily trends related to the global incidence and prevalence of influenza in addition to other emerging infectious diseases of military importance. She was a senior staff veterinarian with the Veterinary Services’ Emergency Programs at the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Her duties included the development, evalu- ation, and improvement of programs and operational activities designed to prevent or eliminate threats to American agriculture from emerging or newly introduced animal diseases. Dr. DuVernoy was a private clinical practitioner for 8 years, focusing on small animal, avian, and exotic internal medicine and surgery. From 1997 to 2001, she investigated adverse vaccine events in children postimmunization while at the Food and Drug Admin- istration (FDA) and disease outbreaks among military personnel while at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine. She then spent 21/2 years at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Center for Veterinary Public Health, where she oversaw the rabies and West Nile virus programs and was the acting state public health vet- erinarian for 11/2 years. She is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. Dr. DuVernoy received her D.V.M. from the University of Florida, and an M.P.H. from the Uniformed Services Uni- versity of the Health Sciences. Jeremy Farrar, B.Sc., M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P., D.Phil, OBE, has been the section head of Oxford University’s Neurological Disorders department since 2005. He is also director of Oxford University’s Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The Clinical Research Unit is dedicated to clinical and laboratory research on tropical infectious diseases, including dengue, malaria, typhoid, tetanus, and influenza, as well as infectious diseases affecting the brain. Dr. Farrar coordinates the South East Asia Influenza Clinical Research Network across Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam, with international partners from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Oxford University, Wellcome Trust, and the WHO. His research interests include the interplay between infections and the immune system as well as the pathophysiology and treatment of bacterial meningitis, tubercu- lous meningitis, tetanus, malaria, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and Japanese B encephalitis. Dr. Farrar was recently awarded the Oon International Award for Preventative Medicine for his work on avian flu (H5N1). He is also an elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and the Academy of Medical Sciences of the United Kingdom, and was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for this contribution to the scientific field. Dr. Farrar

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 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES undertook his medical training at University College and the Westminster Hospital London and subsequently trained in Neurology in Edinburgh, Melbourne, San Francisco, and Oxford. He has a Ph.D. in Immunology from Oxford. Marc Fischer, M.D., M.P.H., is an officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, and chief of the Surveillance and Epidemiology Activity in the Arboviral Diseases Branch at the U.S. CDC in Fort Collins, CO. He joined the CDC in 1994 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer in the Childhood and Vac- cine Preventable Diseases Branch in the Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. From 1999 to 2005, Dr. Fischer served as director of the CDC Unexplained Deaths and Critical Illnesses Project (UNEX). He moved to the Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases in 2005. Current activities and research interests include surveillance and epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis and West Nile viruses, and development and implementation of arboviral vaccines. Dr. Fischer received his bachelor’s and medical degrees from Duke University, and his M.P.H. from the University of Washington in Seattle. He completed a residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediat- ric infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle. Dr. Fischer is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and a member of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. He is the CDC lead of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Japanese encephalitis vaccine working group, the CDC liaison to the AAP Commit- tee on Infectious Diseases (Red Book Committee), and an editor for The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. Larry Glickman, V.M.D., Dr.P.H., M.P.H., is adjunct professor of clinical epidemiology in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and senior epidemi- ologist at OneEpi, a consulting firm. From 1978 to 2008, he was professor of epidemiology at veterinary and medical colleges at Cornell University, University of Pennsylvania, and Purdue University. Dr. Glickman obtained his V.M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and holds postdoctoral degrees in Physiology from the State University of New York at Bingham- ton, and Epidemiology and Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh. In 2004, with a $1.2 million U.S. CDC grant, he created the National Com- panion Animal Surveillance Program to detect acts of bioterrorism, monitor emerging and zoonotic diseases, and study the effects of toxic chemicals on companion animal health. Dr. Glickman is recognized for developing the field of veterinary pharmacoepidemiology through his vaccine and drug safety research using national veterinary medical databases. He has published more than 300 journal articles, book chapters, and monographs and he has received more than $10 million in grants and contracts from

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 APPENDIX D federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, CDC, FDA, USDA, and U.S. Department of Education, as well as private foundations and industry. Dr. Glickman’s honors include the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health award as one of 50 major contributors to public health in the past 50 years; an Alumni Award of Merit from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine for Advancing Animal Health; the Pfizer Prize for Research Excellence; the American Kennel Club Award for Canine Research; The Merck Award for Creativ- ity in Veterinary Education; and the Purdue University Inaugural Prize for Sustained Excellence in Animal Health Research. He served as chairperson of the National Academy of Sciences committee that authored Animals as Sentinels of Environmental Health Hazards in 1991. William B. Karesh, D.V.M., leads the global health programs of the Wildlife Conservation Society. Dr. Karesh has pioneered initiatives focusing atten- tion on problems raised by the interactions among wildlife, people, and their animals, and he leads a team of more than 100 health professionals working around the world on these issues. Programs cover terrain from Argentina to Zambia and range from efforts in the Congo Basin to reduce the impact of diseases such as Ebola, measles, and tuberculosis on endan- gered species such as gorillas and chimpanzees, as well as humans living in the region, to global surveillance systems for emerging disease. Dr. Karesh also chairs the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Wildlife Health Specialist Group, a network of more than 400 wildlife and health experts living and working in 55 countries. Dr. Karesh is currently chief of party for the Wild Bird Global Avian Influenza Network for Sur- veillance (GAINS) program. He also serves as president of the OIE Wildlife Working Group and co-chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission– Wildlife Health Specialist Group. Dr. Karesh received his D.V.M. from the University of Georgia. He has been a speaker at a number of the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Microbial Threats workshops. Marlo Libel, M.D., M.P.H., is a medical epidemiologist with PAHO’s Control of Communicable Diseases Program in the Disease Prevention and Control Area. He is responsible for the implementation of the Regional Plan for Surveillance and Control of Emerging and Reemerging Diseases. He has worked as an epidemiologist within a variety of PAHO programs since he began working there in 1985, including the Health Situation Analysis Program, Health Situation and Trend Assessment Program, and Communicable Diseases Program. Previously, he worked in the Rio Grande do Sul State Health Department, Brazil. Dr. Libel earned his M.D. from Faculdade Católica de Medicina do Porto Alegre and his M.P.H. from the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at Tulane University. He has

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 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES published in journals such as WHO and PAHO bulletins, American Journal of Epidemiology, and Science. Barbara Martin, M.S., is the coordinator of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) for the USDA’s APHIS at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. She is responsible for ensuring that the United States has the capacity and capability for early detection, rapid response, and recovery from foreign animal diseases. She has coordi- nated the implementation of national, standardized surveillance for high- priority diseases including classical swine fever and avian influenza, and is currently focusing efforts on preparedness, including table-top exercises in NAHLN laboratories throughout the United States. Prior to becoming NAHLN coordinator, she led USDA validation efforts for rapid diag- nostic assays for diseases including foot and mouth and classical swine fever; was responsible for the production, evaluation, and distribution of reagents used in the USDA’s brucellosis, tuberculosis, and Johne’s disease programs; developed and implemented standardized training and profi- ciency testing processes for brucella serology; and was involved in the review of laboratories in other countries to assess diagnostic capabilities, make recommendations on diagnostic methodologies, and deploy new technologies. James Pearson, D.V.M., M.S., is currently a consultant to the OIE. Formerly, he was head of OIE’s Scientific and Technical Department. Dr. Pearson joined the OIE staff in 1999 and directed one of the three technical depart- ments until 2002. He coordinated technical support activities, meetings, and publications of several OIE scientific groups that develop animal health Standards and Guidelines (e.g., disease diagnosis and surveillance, import/ export, wildlife, research, vaccines). Dr. Pearson was elected vice president of the OIE Standards Commission in 1991 and served in this position until 2000. Since 2002, Dr. Pearson has continued to represent the OIE at national and international meetings and he is the consultant technical editor for the OIE Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals. Dr. Pearson is also veterinary consultant for Bechtel National Inc. and is helping to coordinate the program to establish veterinary diag- nostic laboratories and animal health programs in Uzbekistan, Georgia, and Kazakhstan. Philip M. Polgreen, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor at the University of Iowa and the director of the Infectious Diseases Society of America’s (IDSA’s) Emerging Infections Network, a U.S. CDC-sponsored sentinel sur- veillance group. He is currently working with an interdisciplinary group of researchers to apply quantitative approaches (e.g., social networking, time

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 APPENDIX D series methods) to understand and solve problems in the field of infectious diseases. In addition to traditional hospital epidemiology, his research inter- ests include developing new ways to aggregate information about infectious diseases (e.g., prediction markets) and applying quantitative methods to help prevent the spread of infections. Dr. Polgreen is a member of the IDSA and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. He received his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati. Sylvia Robles, M.D., M.Sc., is a senior public health specialist at The World Bank. Her current work focuses on public health policy. Dr. Robles has worked on program evaluation and research on disease prevention and control in middle- and low-income countries. She previously worked for the PAHO Division of Disease Prevention and Control, where she led the Non- communicable Disease Program for the Region of the Americas. She holds an M.D. from the University of Costa Rica and a M.Sc. in Epidemiology from the University of Toronto. Pierre Rollin, M.D., began his career at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, working on rabies and viral hemorrhagic fevers in conjunction with overseas Pasteur Institutes. After serving a National Research Council fellowship at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, he joined the Special Pathogens Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, CDC. He was directly involved in the discovery and characterization of public health responses to a number of new and emerging diseases (e.g., Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever, Marburg hemorrhagic fever, Sabia virus infection, Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, Rift Valley fever, Crimean- Congo hemorrhagic fever, Nipah encephalitis, and SARS), their diagnosis in the laboratory and development of diagnostic tests, the management of outbreaks in the field (public health response, patient management, safety, diagnosis in the field, epidemiology, reservoir search), and the pathogen- esis of disease in human and animal models. His research interests con- cern emerging zoonotic and arthropod-borne infectious diseases, with an emphasis on viral hemorrhagic fevers. Dr. Rollin received his M.D. from Montpellier University in France. Alejandro Thiermann, D.V.M., Ph.D., is president of the Standard Setting Committee for the OIE at its headquarters in Paris. He has been seconded to the OIE by USDA–APHIS to serve as the special advisor to the Director General of the OIE. During 1997–1999 he was twice elected chairman of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Sanitary and Phytosanitary Committee. In 1994 he was elected vice president of the Code Commission of the OIE. In 2000 he was elected, and in 2003 and 2006 reelected, president of this standard-setting committee. Dr. Thiermann was an active member of U.S.

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0 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES delegations involved in the negotiation of the Uruguay Round of the WTO and the drafting of the new International Plant Protection Convention. He also served for 2 years as the U.S. Coordinator for the Codex Alimentarius. A native of Chile, Dr. Thiermann received his D.V.M. from the University of Chile at Santiago, and his Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology from the School of Medicine at Wayne State University in Michigan. Tracee Treadwell, R.N., D.V.M., M.P.H., is associate director for Zoonotic Disease Science at the National Center for Zoonotic, Vectorborne and Enteric Diseases, Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases, at the U.S. CDC. In this role Dr. Treadwell is the senior scientist for zoonoses, work- ing with various experts and senior management both internal and exter- nal to the agency to determine the strategic vision and goal for zoonotic disease science. Dr. Treadwell also manages the CDC’s OIE Collaborating Center for Emerging and Re-emerging Zoonoses and is responsible for managing the cross-agency issues surrounding pathogens that may have recently been identified as zoonotic or have the potential for zoonotic implications, such as Methicillin-drug Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and C. difficile. Dr. Treadwell is also developing the surveillance system “node” for BioPhusion that will include animal and human infor- mation. In her most recent role, Dr. Treadwell had overall responsibility of 20 staff members who serve as the emergency responders for the National Center for Infectious Diseases for terrorism and other infectious disease emergencies. Dr. Treadwell is recognized as a leader in public health sur- veillance, especially for high-profile gatherings and terrorism and emerg- ing infectious diseases. She has served as the CDC lead for surveillance and epidemiology at many high-profile events such as the World Trade Organization Ministerial in Seattle, 1999; Democratic and Republican National Conventions in Los Angeles and Philadelphia, 2000; Superbowl in Tampa, 2001; World Trade Center attacks, 2001; World Series, 2001; and Olympics in Greece, 2004. She has served as the lead developer for the “Drop in Surveillance” systems that have been used at these events and many more. Dr. Treadwell served as the co-team leader on the team that received initial information for triage of suspected anthrax patients during the anthrax events of 2001. Additionally, she served as a WHO consultant while employed by CDC for deployment to Nigeria for polio eradication and served as the WHO lead in Hong Kong SAR during the SARS outbreak in 2003. Dr. Treadwell serves as the lead epidemiologist for CDC working on the integration of animal data into human data for a better idea of the health of a population, and she serves as the lead CDC epidemiologist working with the Laboratory Response Network on the use of this system as a tool for surveillance for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies. Dr. Treadwell also serves as the CDC

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 APPENDIX D lead on the consequence management and public health response for the Biowatch program. Scott Wright, Ph.D., M.S., has been intensely interested in and involved with wildlife and ultimately wildlife diseases throughout his academic training and professional career. Currently, he is the branch chief of the Disease Investigations Branch with the USGS National Wildlife Health Center, the only federal diagnostic and research laboratory focused exclu- sively on wildlife, in Madison, WI. Prior to that, Dr. Wright worked for the former Florida Marine Research Institute (now part of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission), where he established the Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory which focused exclusively on diseases of marine mammals. Dr. Wright’s undergraduate study at the University of South Florida and early graduate education at the University of Florida gave him the opportunity to learn the multiple ecosystems within the state. His first look at wildlife diseases as a component of ecosystems was his involvement in the raccoon rabies dynamics as they were established in southern Florida. He gained a formal appreciation of wildlife diseases as a fellow of the Northeastern Research Center for Wildlife Diseases housed within the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Connecticut. He completed his doctoral training in veterinary pathology with a focus on diseases of wildlife, looking at Lyme disease as a thesis topic. He returned to Florida to continue training as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Infectious Disease of the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Florida. As part of Dr. Wright’s extra-professional activities, he has been active in many aspects of the Wildlife Disease Association (WDA) and is now president. The WDA is the only international professional association of scientists focused on wildlife diseases. Mmeta Yongolo, M.V.Sc., M.V.M., Ph.D., is head of the Virology Depart- ment of the Central Veterinary Laboratory, Ministry of Livestock Devel- opment and Fisheries in Tanzania. He is a virologist focusing in molecular epidemiology of viral diseases. Since 1993, he has undertaken research and diagnosis of viral zoonotic and transboundary diseases, those spread- ing between countries, of economic impact to animal populations in Tanzania, namely Newcastle disease; avian influenza; Gumboro; Fowl pox; Lumpy skin disease; ephemeral fever; foot-and-mouth disease; Rift Valley fever; rabies; African Swine Fever; canine distemper; Parvovirus; and Nairobi sheep disease. Currently he is national coordinator for avian and human influenza in Tanzania. He also serves as secretary to the Tanzanian National Task Force on Avian and Human Influenza as well as to the Rift Valley fever technical committee. Dr. Yongolo is a member of the Eastern Africa Laboratory network, the principal investigator for an

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 GLOBAL SURVEILLANCE OF ZOONOTIC DISEASES avian influenza USAID-University of Minnesota–funded project, and lead investigator of Rift Valley fever SACCO Savings and Credit Cooperative- funded projects. He has also served as an FAO avian influenza laboratory expert in Sudan.