Appendix B
Biographic Information on the Committee on Health Risks of Phthalates

DEBORAH CORY-SLECHTA (Chair) is a professor of environmental medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She was formerly director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her research interests include the relationships between neurotransmitter systems and behavior and how such relationships are altered by exposure to environmental toxicants, particularly the role of environmental neurotoxicants in developmental disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Cory-Slechta has served on numerous national research review and advisory panels, including those for the National Institutes of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene and the Committee on Toxicology and on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Gulf War and Health: Literature Review of Pesticides and Solvents. She received her PhD from the University of Minnesota.


EDMUND CROUCH is a senior scientist with Cambridge Environmental, Inc. He has published widely on environmental quality, biostatistics, risk assessment, and presentation and analysis of uncertainties. He is a coauthor of a major text on risk assessment, Risk/Benefit Analysis. Dr. Crouch serves as an expert adviser to various local and national agencies concerned with public health and the environment and has served on nine National Research Council committees. He has written computer programs for the sophisticated analysis of results of carcinogenesis bioassays, has developed algorithms (on the levels of both theory and computer implementation) for the objective quantification of waste-site contamination, and has designed Monte Carlo simulations for the characterization



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Appendix B Biographic Information on the Committee on Health Risks of Phthalates DEBORAH CORY-SLECHTA (Chair) is a professor of environmental medi- cine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She was formerly director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Insti- tute and chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood John- son Medical School. Her research interests include the relationships between neurotransmitter systems and behavior and how such relationships are altered by exposure to environmental toxicants, particularly the role of environmental neu- rotoxicants in developmental disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Cory-Slechta has served on numerous national research review and advisory panels, including those for the National Institutes of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene and the Committee on Toxicology and on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Gulf War and Health: Literature Review of Pesticides and Solvents. She received her PhD from the University of Minnesota. EDMUND CROUCH is a senior scientist with Cambridge Environmental, Inc. He has published widely on environmental quality, biostatistics, risk assessment, and presentation and analysis of uncertainties. He is a coauthor of a major text on risk assessment, Risk/Benefit Analysis. Dr. Crouch serves as an expert adviser to various local and national agencies concerned with public health and the envi- ronment and has served on nine National Research Council committees. He has written computer programs for the sophisticated analysis of results of carcino- genesis bioassays, has developed algorithms (on the levels of both theory and computer implementation) for the objective quantification of waste-site con- tamination, and has designed Monte Carlo simulations for the characterization 142

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143 Appendix B of uncertainties and variabilities inherent in health risk assessment. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, England, in high-energy physics. PAUL FOSTER is the acting chief of the Toxicology Operations Branch and deputy director of the National Toxicology Program’s Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in Research Triangle Park, NC. His recent research has focused on the mechanisms of environmental chemical and drug effects on reproductive development. Before joining NIEHS in 2002, he was the director of the research program in endocrine, reproductive, and developmental toxicol- ogy at the CIIT Centers for Health Research. Dr. Foster’s research interests include the potential human health effects of environmental endocrine disruptors (particularly antiandrogens), mechanisms of testicular toxicity, early testicular Leydig cell dysfunction induced by chemicals as a prelude to hyperplasia and tumors, and the toxicokinetic and dynamic characteristics of the induction of reproductive and developmental toxicity. He also has a broad interest in risk- assessment issues in those subjects. Dr. Foster has served on numerous national and international advisory committees dealing with reproductive toxicology and endocrine disruption, including the Federal Advisory Committee on the Envi- ronmental Protection Agency’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. He has served on National Research Council committees, including the Subcommittee on Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. He earned a PhD in biochem- istry and toxicology at Brunel University, United Kingdom. MARY FOX is assistant professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research is focused on developing cumulative risk assessment to inform public- health decision-making. Dr. Fox has applied cumulative-risk methods in numer- ous community health assessments. Her current research is directed at national- level decision-making and includes the relationship between exposure to a mix- ture of nephrotoxic metals and renal function and model uncertainty and the potential for error in cumulative exposure assessments for pesticides as man- dated by the Food Quality Protection Act. Dr. Fox earned her MPH from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and her PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. KEVIN GAIDO is senior investigator with the Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences. His research specialty is receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. Dr. Gaido’s current interests focus on chemical interactions with steroid- hormone receptors and the resulting cellular and molecular responses. Dr. Gaido earned his PhD in pharmacology and toxicology from the West Virginia Univer- sity Medical Center. MAIDA GALVEZ is an assistant professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics at the Mount Sinai

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144 Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: The Tasks Ahead School of Medicine. She is a board-certified pediatrician who directs Mount Sinai’s Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit and practices general pediatrics. She is co-principal investigator and a designated new investigator of a research project funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sci- ences (NIEHS) and the Environmental Protection Agency, “Growing Up Healthy in East Harlem,” a community-based participatory research project ex- amining the environmental determinants of childhood obesity. She is also coin- vestigator of a project funded by NIEHS and the National Cancer Institute to assess environmental determinants of puberty in girls. Her research interests include the urban built environment, endocrine disruptors, and childhood growth and development. Dr. Galvez earned her MD and MPH from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. CHRIS GENNINGS is professor of biostatistics at the Virginia Commonwealth University and the director of the research incubator for the Center for Clinical and Translational Research. Her research interests include nonlinear regression modeling, categorical data analysis, analysis of complex mixtures, and statistical issues in mixture toxicology, and she has published extensively on these topics. She has a research project on empirical approaches for evaluating sufficiently similar complex mixtures and is the director of a training grant focused on the integration of mixture toxicology, toxicogenomics, and statistics. She earned her PhD in biostatistics from the Virginia Commonwealth University. J. PAUL GILMAN is senior vice president and chief sustainability officer for Convanta Energy. Previously, he served as director of the Oak Ridge Center for Advanced Studies and as assistant administrator for research and development in the Environmental Protection Agency. He also worked in the Office of Man- agement and Budget, where he had oversight responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) and all other science agencies, and in DOE, where he advised the secretary of energy on scientific and technical matters. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Gilman was the executive director of the Commission on Life Sciences and the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources of the National Research Coun- cil. He is a member of the National Research Council Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Gilman earned PhDs in ecology and evolutionary biology from Johns Hopkins University. RUSS HAUSER is professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology in the Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology of the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on the effects of environmental and occupational chemicals on reproductive health with emphasis on fertility and pregnancy outcomes. He is conducting epidemiologic studies on the rela- tionship of chlorinated chemicals, pesticides, bisphenol A, and phthalates with male and female reproductive health. He is also conducting a prospective cohort study on children in Chapaevsk, Russia, where he is investigating the relation- ship of exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds with growth and pubertal

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145 Appendix B development. He recently began a two-state study in collaboration with re- searchers from Yale University on genetic and environmental risk factors for testicular germ-cell cancer. He has served on two Institute of Medicine Commit- tees on Gulf War and Health and the National Research Council Committee on the Review of the National Children’s Study Research Plan. He is an associate editor and on the Advisory Board of Environmental Health Perspectives and on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epi- demiology. He is chair-elect of the recently established Environment and Repro- duction Special Interest Group of the American Society for Reproductive Medi- cine. He received an MD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine and an MPH and ScD from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he completed a resi- dency in occupational medicine. He is board-certified in occupational medicine. ANDREAS KORTENKAMP is professor and head of the Centre for Toxicol- ogy at the University of London, School of Pharmacy. His research focuses on the effects of multicomponent mixtures of endocrine-active chemicals. The thrust of his work is to assess whether the effects of mixtures of chemicals can be predicted quantitatively on the basis of information on their individual poten- cies. Dr. Kortenkamp’s research interests lie in environmental pollutants that have the potential to cause cancer. For some years, he has concentrated on endo- crine-active chemicals in the environment and their potential role in the rising incidences of breast cancer and testicular cancer. His earlier work was on the mode of action of chromium (VI) compounds, which are recognized occupa- tional carcinogens. Dr. Kortenkamp earned his PhD from Bremen University, Germany. JEFFREY PETERS is professor of molecular toxicology at the Pennsylvania State University. His research interests include the roles of the peroxisome- proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in the regulation of homeostasis, toxic- ity, and carcinogenesis with extensive application of null mouse models. The goal of his research is to identify functional roles of the PPARs in the etiology and prevention of carcinogenesis. Dr. Peters is also conducting research to de- lineate the role of the PPARs in the regulation of homeostasis, including body composition, tissue-specific gene expression, serum lipid biochemistry, and atherosclerosis. Results of the research will determine mechanisms that regulate physiologic lipid metabolism by using different activators reported to interact through PPARs. He earned a PhD in nutrition science from the University of California, Davis. DONNA VORHEES is a principal scientist with the Science Collaborative, where she consults on human health risk assessment for a variety of municipal, federal, and industrial clients. She is also an adjunct assistant professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, where she teaches a course in risk- assessment methods. She has extensive experience in addressing environmental questions arising from multipathway human exposure to chemicals that have

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146 Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: The Tasks Ahead been released to indoor and outdoor environments at federal and state hazard- ous-waste sites. Her research interests include development of probabilistic hu- man exposure models, field surveys to collect data needed to support risk as- sessment, identification of research priorities for improving dredged-material management, and preparation of environmental-health educational materials. Dr. Vorhees conducted probabilistic analyses of multipathway exposure to poly- chlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in residences near the New Bedford Harbor, MA, Superfund site, to PCBs and pesticides that accumulate in fish from an offshore dredged-material disposal site, and to PCBs, dioxins, and furans that accumulate in agricultural products from the floodplain of a contaminated river. She is an active member of the Society for Risk Analysis and the International Society of Exposure Analysis and served on the National Research Council Committee on Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites. Dr. Vorhees earned her ScD in en- vironmental health from the Harvard School of Public Health. MARY SNOW WOLFF is professor of community and preventive medicine and professor of oncologic sciences at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She is also director of the Center for Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the Na- tional Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. Her re- search interests center around application of biologic markers to determine ex- posures of humans to chemicals that occur in the environment. Environmental exposures are considered in the context of diet, lifestyle, and individual suscep- tibility factors and in the context of their relationship to cancer risk, to reproduc- tive dysfunction, and to developmental disorders. She has been involved in nu- merous studies of occupational and ambient environmental exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlori- nated biphenyls. She has also investigated lead poisoning, dermal exposures, and chemicals in breast milk. She has collaborated in several studies of breast- cancer risk associated with environmental exposures and the genetic determi- nants of the risk. More recently, she has shifted emphasis to newly identified exposures that may be most relevant to the 21st century. Dr. Wolff earned a PhD in organic chemistry from Yale University.