D
Biosketches of Committee Members

Richard L. Tucker (Chair) is the Joe C. Walter, Jr., Chair in Engineering Emeritus at the University of Texas, Austin. He currently serves on the board of directors for Hill and Wilkinson, Inc., Integrated Electrical Services. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a member of numerous professional societies and associations, including the National Society of Professional Engineers, the American Association of Cost Engineers, and the American Society for Testing and Materials. Dr. Tucker currently serves on the Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs, known as the Framework Committee. His awards and honors include the Construction Engineering Educator Award of the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Construction Industry Institute’s Ronald Reagan Award for Individual Initiative and Carroll H. Dunn Award, and the Michael Scott Endowed Research Fellow of the Institute for Constructive Capitalism. He has published numerous items spanning four decades, and wrote “Communicating in Construction: The Path to Project Success,” Chapter 1 of the 1996 Wiley Construction Law Update. Dr. Tucker has a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. His areas of expertise include project management aspects of capital facilities delivery, construction project planning, construction productivity, improving efficiency and effectiveness of design and procurement, and contracting.


Paul Barshop is the chief operating officer of Independent Project Analysis (IPA), a consulting firm that specializes in construction project evaluation, benchmark-



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D Biosketches of Committee Members Richard L. Tucker (Chair) is the Joe C. Walter, Jr., Chair in Engineering Emeritus at the University of Texas, Austin. He currently serves on the board of directors for Hill and Wilkinson, Inc., Integrated Electrical Services. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engi- neers, and a member of numerous professional societies and associations, including the National Society of Professional Engineers, the American Association of Cost Engineers, and the American Society for Testing and Materials. Dr. Tucker currently serves on the Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs, known as the Framework Committee. His awards and honors include the Construction Engineering Educator Award of the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Construction Industry Institute’s Ronald Reagan Award for Individual Initia- tive and Carroll H. Dunn Award, and the Michael Scott Endowed Research Fellow of the Institute for Constructive Capitalism. He has published numerous items spanning four decades, and wrote “Communicating in Construction: The Path to Project Success,” Chapter 1 of the 996 Wiley Construction Law Update. Dr. Tucker has a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. His areas of expertise include project management aspects of capital facili- ties delivery, construction project planning, construction productivity, improving efficiency and effectiveness of design and procurement, and contracting. Paul Barshop is the chief operating officer of Independent Project Analysis (IPA), a consulting firm that specializes in construction project evaluation, benchmark- 53

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c o n s t ru c t i o n r e s e a r c h at n i o s h 54 ing, and analysis. He joined IPA in 1994 as a project analyst and was IPA’s quality manager from 1997 to 1999. From 2000 until mid-2004, he was the director of IPA’s Netherlands office with the responsibility of serving clients in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. As a project analyst, Mr. Barshop focused on evaluating downstream process projects, especially in the petroleum and chemical areas. He led numerous benchmarking efforts and conducted more than 75 individual analy- ses of capital projects. He also led research to contribute to the understanding of the performance and drivers of control system projects. His latest research efforts include the study of the effectiveness of engineering value centers and the study of best practices. Mr. Barshop holds a master’s degree in business and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering. Prior to joining IPA, he worked for Shell Oil Com- pany in the United States. His areas of expertise include benchmarking and best practices in the construction industry. Maria Brunette is an assistant professor in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has published numerous articles and conducted research across a broad spectrum of topics, including quality of work life, occupational stress, and the safety and health of Hispanic workers in the United States. Dr. Brunette’s work focuses on applying human factors and systems engineering to the design of work systems. Her interests include methods for measuring the role of job, organizational, and cultural factors in the quality of work life. In all of these areas, her focus is on underrepresented ethnic groups and women, especially those of Hispanic origin. Her scholarly interests include macroergonomics, job and organizational design, job satisfaction and stress, and occupational safety and health. Dr. Brunette received her degrees in industrial engi- neering from the University of Lima, Peru (B.Sc.), from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (M.Sc.), and from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (Ph.D.). Her areas of expertise include ergonomics, human factors and engineering, and Hispanic workers. Patricia A. Buffler is professor of epidemiology and holds the Kenneth and Marjorie Kaiser Chair in Cancer Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Buffler’s research interests include the environmental causes of cancer, especially gene-environment interaction and childhood cancer, lung cancer, leukemia, brain cancer, and breast cancer; epidemiologic research methods; and the uses of epidemiologic data in health policy. She has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council including the following: Committee on Gulf War and Health: Health Effects Associated with Exposure Dur- ing the Persian Gulf War; Subcommittee to Review the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Results and Report; Committee on Environmental Justice: Research,

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aPPendix d 55 Education, and Health Policy Needs; National Forum on Science and Technology Goals: Environment; Steering Committee on Valuing Health Risks, Costs, and Benefits for Environmental Decisions; Committee on Chemical Toxicity and Aging; Committee on Passive Smoking; Committee on Non-occupational Health Risks of Asbestiform Fibers; and Committee on Research of Agents Potentially Hazardous to Human Health. She also served on the Committee to Assess Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR [Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation] VII Phase 2). Dr. Buffler was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1994. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. Angela DiDomenico is a researcher for the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety. Her areas of expertise and research include postural stability and fall preven- tion, occupational biomechanics, and workload assessment. Currently she conducts research within the slips-and-falls domain and seeks to determine the factors that significantly cause or contribute to workplace injuries. Her recent investigations involve measuring postural stability during various tasks, including while working at elevations and following postural transitions to a standing posture. Prior to join- ing the staff at Liberty Mutual, Dr. DiDomenico served as a research assistant in the Industrial Ergonomics Laboratory at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg. At the university, she earned her Ph.D. and M.S. in industrial and systems engineering (human fac- tors) and her M.S. in mathematics. While completing her studies, she received a number of awards and honors, including an internship with the Army Research Laboratory (Aberdeen, Maryland), the Thompson Scholarship for Women in Safety presented by the American Society of Safety Engineers Foundation, and a fellow- ship from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Bradley Evanoff is chief of the Division of General Medical Sciences in the Depart- ment of Internal Medicine at Washington University. He also heads the Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and holds the Richard A. and Elizabeth Henby Sutter Chair in Occupational, Industrial, and Environmental Medicine. Dr. Evanoff ’s areas of expertise include the epidemiology and prevention of work- related musculoskeletal disorders, work-related health problems in health care workers, and the evaluation of occupational medical education. In addition to his academic duties, Dr. Evanoff is involved in many issues related to employee health and safety at Barnes-Jewish Center Healthcare. He received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and his medical degree from Washington Uni- versity. Following a residency in internal medicine at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, he completed a Fogarty postdoctoral fellowship at the Swedish National Institute of Occupational Health. He was then a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program and the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at

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c o n s t ru c t i o n r e s e a r c h at n i o s h 56 the University of Washington in Seattle, where he also received his master’s degree in public health. Dr. Evanoff ’s areas of expertise also include occupational and environmental medicine, epidemiology, the design and analysis of intervention studies, and the use of functional status measures. Linda M. Goldenhar is currently an assistant dean, associate professor of family medicine, and director of the Office of Evaluation and Research in Medical Educa- tion at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. For 9 years prior to joining the University of Cincinnati, she was a research psychologist and team leader of the Intervention Effectiveness Research National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) team at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Goldenhar’s areas of expertise include both qualitative and quantitative research methods to conduct program evaluation and research studies. Her evaluations have covered a variety of content areas including the safety and health of women working in nontraditional occupations, job stress, and, in particular, intervention evaluation in occupational health and safety as well as medical education. She is widely published and has been invited to present both nationally and internation- ally on these topics. She is an associate editor of Public Health Reports, is on the editorial board of the Journal of Safety Research, and is a regular reviewer for Work and Stress and the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. William H. Kojola is the industrial hygienist for the AFL-CIO. His experience in health and safety spans more than 25 years, during which he has been the director of the Occupational Safety and Health Division of the Laborers Health and Safety Fund of North America, an occupational safety and health specialist for the Inter- national Brotherhood of Boilermakers, and director of safety and health for the United Cement, Lime, Gypsum and Allied Workers International Union. Prior to this, Mr. Kojola was a health research scientist at the University of Illinois School of Public Health, studying the human health effects of air and water pollutants. With the AFL-CIO, he is responsible for developing strategies for securing new safety and health protections through federal and state regulations, coordinating with affiliates on and leading a unified labor response to proposed Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, and representing the AFL-CIO before government regu- latory agencies, on federal advisory committees, and in consensus standard-setting efforts. He also provides technical and strategic support to organizing campaigns on safety and health issues. Mr. Kojola holds a B.S. degree in biology and an M.S. degree in genetics from the University of Minnesota and studied toxicology and industrial hygiene at the University of Illinois School of Public Health. His areas of expertise include industrial hygiene and labor relations.

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aPPendix d 57 Emmitt J. Nelson is president of Nelson Consulting, Inc., a safety consulting firm specializing in the Zero Injury Concept in eliminating worker injury. He was retained by Shell Oil Company in 1990 to chair the “Zero Accidents Task Force” of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) located at the University of Texas. Through research, this task force identified the unique safety management tech- niques that successful contractors and owners use in the construction industry to achieve zero worker injuries. Mr. Nelson has continued to analyze the research data and uses this information to lead his clients into new realms of excellence in safety performance. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a degree in mechanical engineering. He has been honored with the Business Roundtable Construction Safety Excellence Award; was named CII Co-Instructor of the Year in 2003, and was inducted into the National Academy of Construction on the basis of his contribution to safety in the construction industry. He is a licensed profes- sional engineer in the state of Texas and an associate member of American Society of Safety Engineers. His areas of expertise include the construction industry and construction safety practices. Peter Philips is professor and chair of the economics department at the University of Utah. He received his B.A from Pomona College in 1970 and his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1980. He is a labor economist and economic historian. His research focuses on the construction industry. Dr. Philips’s areas of expertise include prevailing wage laws and employment, training, wages, benefits, and safety in the construction industry. He has many academic publications to his credit. He has also served as an expert on the construction industry for the U.S. Labor Depart- ment and the U.S. Department of Justice. Dr. Philips has testified before many state legislatures on construction regulation issues. His most recent books, Building Chaos: An International Comparison of Deregulation in the Construction Industry (Routledge Press, 2003) and The Economics of Prevailing Wage Laws (Ashgate Press, 2005), and his most recent journal articles focus on school construction costs, con- struction labor market regulation, fatalities in the construction workplace, and the effect of subcontracting on construction safety. He is co-editor with Garth Mangum of Three Worlds of Labor Economics (M.E. Sharpe, 1986) and coauthor of Portable Pensions for Casual Labor Markets: The Central Pension Fund of the Operating Engi- neers (Quorum Books, 1995). Iris D. Tommelein is professor of engineering and project management in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of California, Berkeley. She teaches and conducts research on what is termed lean construction, developing the theory and principles of project-based production management for the architecture-engineering-construction industry. Professor Tommelein’s current

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c o n s t ru c t i o n r e s e a r c h at n i o s h 58 research focuses on the work specialty that contractors and suppliers perform and how they can become integral participants in design-build teams in order to increase process and product development performance. Her areas of expertise include con- struction site logistics, layout, materials management, supply-chain management, and electronic commerce. Her work involves computer-aided design, planning, scheduling, simulation, and visualization of construction processes; and the use of information technology including Web-based systems, wireless communication, bar coding, and laser-based positioning systems. Professor Tommelein is the executive director of the newly formed Production Systems Laboratory, a research institute dedicated to developing and deploying knowledge and tools for project manage- ment as well as a learning laboratory for the Northern California construction industry. She is an active participant in the International Group for Lean Construc- tion, and she serves on the board of directors of the Lean Construction Institute. Professor Tommelein served on the executive committee of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Technical Council on Computing and Information Tech- nology. She is a member of the Construction Research Council of the Construction Institute of the ASCE. She is the 2002 recipient of the Walter L. Huber Civil Engi- neering Prize for her research on civil engineering computing for managing project- based production systems in the engineering-architecture-construction industry.