supports basic physical-science research that focuses on energy-related issues.4 The study of catalysis, the process by which a substance (a catalyst) increases the rate of a chemical reaction, is an important part of the research portfolio. This is because catalysts are essential to energy: they are crucial to the development of new energy technologies and to the processing and manufacturing of fuels for energy storage.5

Since 1999, the Catalysis Science Program has sponsored more than 1,000 catalysis basic research grants at universities and national laboratories (Figure S-1). National laboratories have received a smaller number of grants, but the dollar amount of the grants has been split evenly between national laboratories and universities. For fiscal year (FY) 2007, the program was funded at approximately $38 million (3 percent of the BES budget).6

FIGURE S-1 Catalysis basic research grants funded by DOE, FYs 1999–2007.

FIGURE S-1 Catalysis basic research grants funded by DOE, FYs 1999–2007.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Catalysis Science Program.

4

About DOE. U.S. Department of Energy. http://www.doe.gov/about/index.htm. Accessed May 9, 2008.

5

Industrial Technologies Program: Chemicals Industry of the Future. U.S. Department of Energy. http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/chemicals/. Accessed May 9, 2008.

6

FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request-- Budget Highlights. U.S. Department of Energy http://www.cfo.doe.gov/budget/09budget/Content/Highlights/Highlight2009.pdf. Accessed May 9, 2008.



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