• Theory (e.g., density functional theory) and mechanistic understandings

  • New methods (analytical, e.g., XAFS; operando)

  • New oxidation processes and catalysts (e.g., Au, Pd/Au)

  • Environmental catalysis (catalytic converters, emission control catalyst, lean NOx, low sulfur).

On the basis of the information provided above, the Catalysis Science Program portfolio appears to have a good distribution overall in its funding of basic research in the broad categories of homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis. During the time period studied, BES staff did a good job of maintaining the balance between experienced and new researchers within the portfolio by providing stable funding for established researchers while bringing new researchers and topics into the program. However, there are variations in the quality and relevance of the research in the portfolio, which will be discussed in detail in Chapter 5.

TABLE 3-1 Funding and Number of Catalysis Science Program Grants for Research in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis, FYs 1999–2001, 2002–2004, 2005–2007

 

 

Funding (millions of dollars)

Percentage of Total Funding

No. Grants

Heterogeneous catalysis

 

 

 

 

 

1999–2001

48

67%

88

 

2002–2004

67

74%

102

 

2005–2007

79

73%

137

Homogeneous catalysis

 

 

 

 

 

1999–2001

24

33%

50

 

2002–2004

24

26%

39

 

2005–2007

$30

27%

62

NOTE: Grants for research in heterogeneous catalysis (multiphase reactions catalyzed by solid-state catalysts) include nanoscience, surface science, theory, and other initiatives. Grants for research in homogeneous catalysis (single-phase reactions catalyzed by molecular catalysts) include biocatalysis. Data include individual, small-group, and conference grants.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Catalysis Science Program.



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