Appendix B
Guest Speaker and Committee Biographic Information

GUEST SPEAKERS

Alexis T. Bell (NAE) is a professor of chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in 1967. Dr. Bell also has served as assistant dean and dean of the College of Chemistry and as chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering. He is a faculty senior scientist in the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Bell is known for his research in heterogeneous catalysis and is recognized as one of the leaders in applying in situ spectroscopic techniques in combination with isotopic tracer techniques to the study of catalyzed reactions. Of particular note have been his investigations of the mechanism of Fischer–Tropsch synthesis, the synthesis of methanol, the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide, the oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes, and the direct conversion of methane to oxygenates. He is the editor of Catalysis Reviews and Chemical Engineering Science and serves on the editorial boards of many other journals. He also has served on numerous committees of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), the Council for Chemical Research (CCR), and the National Research Council. The results of his research have been published in more than 510 articles in refereed journals. Dr. Bell has received many honors for his research contributions, including the American Association of Engineering Education Curtis W. McGraw Award for Research; the AIChE Professional Progress, R. H. Wilhelm, and William H. Walker Awards; the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Paul H. Emmett Award in Fundamental Catalysis and Robert Burwell Lectureship; the ACS Award for Creative Research in Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis; and the NACS and European Federation of Catalysis Societies Michel Boudart Award for the Advancement of Catalysis. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has received an honorary professorship from the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He also has presented 11



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Appendix B Guest Speaker and Committee Biographic Information GUEST SPEAKERS Alexis T. Bell (NAE) is a professor of chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in 1967. Dr. Bell also has served as assis- tant dean and dean of the College of Chemistry and as chairman of the Depart- ment of Chemical Engineering. He is a faculty senior scientist in the E. O. Law- rence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Bell is known for his research in heterogeneous catalysis and is recognized as one of the leaders in applying in situ spectroscopic techniques in combination with isotopic tracer techniques to the study of catalyzed reactions. Of particular note have been his investigations of the mechanism of Fischer–Tropsch synthesis, the synthesis of methanol, the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide, the oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes, and the direct conversion of methane to oxygenates. He is the editor of Catalysis Reviews and Chemical Engineering Science and serves on the editorial boards of many other journals. He also has served on numerous committees of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the American Institute of Chemical En- gineers (AIChE), the Council for Chemical Research (CCR), and the National Research Council. The results of his research have been published in more than 510 articles in refereed journals. Dr. Bell has received many honors for his re- search contributions, including the American Association of Engineering Educa- tion Curtis W. McGraw Award for Research; the AIChE Professional Progress, R. H. Wilhelm, and William H. Walker Awards; the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Paul H. Emmett Award in Fundamental Catalysis and Robert Burwell Lectureship; the ACS Award for Creative Research in Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis; and the NACS and European Federation of Catalysis Societies Michel Boudart Award for the Advancement of Catalysis. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American As- sociation for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the American Acad- emy of Arts and Sciences and has received an honorary professorship from the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He also has presented 11 97

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98 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY named lectures at various universities and research institutes. Dr. Bell received his Sc.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy in 1967. Charles P. Casey (NAS) is Homer B. Adkins Emeritus Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research lies at the interface be- tween organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis, and his group stud- ies the mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Dr. Casey is author of more than 250 papers in organometallic chemistry. He has served as chairman of the Organometallic Subdivision and of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and as president of ACS (in 2004), and he is a member of the editorial advisory board of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. In 1993, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Casey received the ACS A.C. Cope Scholar Award in 1988 and Award in Organometallic Chemis- try in 1991. He received his B.S. from St. Louis University and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Michael J. Clarke was the program director for inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic chemistry at the National Science Foundation and holds a per- manent position as a professor of chemistry at Boston College. His research fo- cus is on how unusual transition-metal ions interact with biologic systems. He has designed and discovered new bioactive metal-containing agents for antican- cer and other types of therapy, developed the activation-by-reduction hypothesis for metal anticancer agents, and participated in developing the concept that ru- thenium anticancer compounds preferentially enter cancer cells by binding to transferrin. He was among the first to explore how ruthenium complexes bind to DNA and developed some of the early fundamental chemistry of technetium relevant to its use in radioimaging agents. He continues to explore how metal ions affect DNA, RNA, coenzymes, and important sulfur-containing polypep- tides, such as glutathione. Dr. Clarke is interested in how nitrosyl ruthenium compounds can affect the strengthening of neuronal synapses through the re- lease of nitric oxide at the neuronal site. Anthony Cugini serves as director of the Department of Energy National En- ergy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Office of Research and Development (ORD), which comprises the on-site research personnel and laboratories in Mor- gantown, West Virginia; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Albany, Oregon. Before being named director of ORD, Dr. Cugini served as focus area leader of the NETL Computational and Basic Sciences Focus Area. During his tenure as fo- cus area leader, NETL strengthened its position in computational research rang- ing from computational chemistry through larger-scale process modeling. Be- fore coming to NETL in 1987, Dr. Cugini worked at Procter and Gamble and Gulf Research. At NETL, he has served primarily in ORD. Dr. Cugini has had a

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99 APPENDIX B variety of research interests over a wide cross-section of energy and environ- mental technologies, including the kinetics of exothermic reactions, catalyst development, advanced carbon synthesis, hydrogen production and separation, gas hydrates, carbon dioxide sequestration, and computational modeling. His publications have included the topics of robotics technology, decontamination of military aircraft surfaces with novel polymeric materials, carbon dioxide seques- tration technologies, novel catalysts, the effect of catalyst physical properties on activity, hydrogen separation and modeling, advanced carbon production, and computational modeling. Dr. Cugini received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. Robert J. Davis is a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Vir- ginia, where he has served as the chair of chemical engineering since 2002. Dr. Davis has extensively used in situ spectroscopic methods coupled with both steady-state and transient kinetic methods to elucidate how oxide supports and basic promoters alter the active sites for a variety of catalytic reactions, includ- ing selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, acid–base reactions, and ammonia syn- thesis. He has received numerous awards, including the Emmett Award of the North American Catalysis Society, the National Science Foundation Young In- vestigator Award, the DuPont Young Professor Award, and the Union Carbide Innovation Recognition Award. He is the author or coauthor of about 100 publi- cations, one patent, and a textbook titled Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction Engineering. Dr. Davis has served as president of the Southeastern Catalysis Society, chair of the 2006 Gordon research conference on catalysis, chair of ca- talysis programming of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), director of the Catalysis and Reaction Engineering Division of AIChE, and a member of the editorial boards of Applied Catalysis A and B and Journal of Mo- lecular Catalysis A. He obtained his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Stan- ford University in 1989 and was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Chemistry Department of the University of Namur in Belgium. Bruce C. Gates (NAE) is a professor of chemical engineering at the University of California, Davis. He started his career as a research engineer at Chevron in 1967. In 1968, he joined the faculty of the University of Delaware, where he became the H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Chemical Engineering and served as director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology. In 1992, he moved to the University of California, Davis, where he is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science. Dr. Gates has re- ceived numerous awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Chemical Society for his work in catalysis by metal clusters, solid acids, and zeolites. He is editor of Advances in Catalysis. Dr. Gates earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1961 and his Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1966 and was a postdoctoral fellow in physical chemistry at the University of Munich.

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100 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY L. Louis Hegedus (NAE) retired in 2006 after 10 years of service as the senior vice president for research and development of Arkema Inc., a diversified chemical company headquartered in Paris. He was responsible for all R&D in North America and for R&D coordination between the United States and France. His previous positions include 16 years with W. R. Grace, where he was a research vice president for specialty chemicals, and 8 years with the General Motors Research Laboratories, where he contributed to the development of the catalytic converter for automobile emission control. Dr. Hegedus is a past chairman of the Chemical Engineering Section of the National Academy of En- gineering and a past chairman of the Council for Chemical Research. He re- ceived his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley and an M.S. in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Budapest. W. Christopher Hollinsed is director of the Office of Research Grants of the American Chemical Society (ACS), which includes the ACS Petroleum Re- search Fund. The Petroleum Research Fund, with current assets of over $600 million, has provided funding for advanced scientific education and fundamental research in the petroleum field for over 52 years. Dr. Hollinsed joined ACS in 2005 after 26 years in the corporate world in a variety of research and leadership positions at DuPont and Polaroid. At DuPont, he was manager of academic pro- grams, heading DuPont’s Young Professor grant program and the Science and Engineering grants program. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wis- consin and his B.S. from City College of New York. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and recently received a Service Award from the National Organization for the Professional Advance- ment of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers for serving as an advocate for the organization. Gretchen Jordan is a principal member of the technical staff of Sandia Na- tional Laboratories. Since 1993, she has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop innovative methods for assessing the effectiveness of research programs. Projects with the DOE Office of Science include methods to assess and improve the research environment and identification of best practices in the management of science. She also works with DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy offices on evaluation and performance measurement at the project, program, and portfolio levels and assists the Sandia Science and Tech- nology Strategic Management Unit in those activities. She has edited two special issues on measuring R&D performance in the Journal of Technology Transfer (July 1997) and Evaluation and Program Planning (1999) and contributed chap- ters to two books on evaluating science program. Before joining Sandia, Dr. Jordan was chairman of the Business Administration Department at the College

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101 APPENDIX B of Santa Fe and a member of the staff of Senator Pete V. Domenici and the Sen- ate Budget Committee. Tobin J. Marks (NAS) is the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor and Vladimir N. Iptieff Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University. Through landmark synthetic, mechanistic, and thermodynamic investigations, he and his students opened a new portion of the periodic table to organometallic chemistry. He has also made major advances in solid-state, polymer, bioinorganic, and bo- ron hydride chemistry and in photochemical isotope separation. During his ca- reer, Dr. Marks has received numerous awards. Recent honors include the 2005 National Medal of Science, the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal, the John C. Bailar Medal from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Sir Edward Frankland Prize Lectureship of the British Royal Society of Chemis- try, and the Karl Ziegler Prize of the German Chemical Society. Dr. Marks is also the recipient of three American Chemical Society (ACS) national awards and the ACS Chicago Section’s 2001 Josiah Willard Gibbs Medal. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1993 and to the German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina in 2005. He received his B.S. from Maryland University and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Raul Miranda is a program manager in the U.S. Department of Energy Catalysis and Chemical Transformations Program and has 17 years of academic experience at the University of Louisville as a professor of chemical engineer- ing. In 1990–1991, he was a visiting professor at the University of Mar del Plata in Argentina and Ecole Nationale Sup. de Chimie in Montpellier, France. From 1984 to 1989, he was summer research faculty associate at the Argonne National Laboratory in the Chemistry Division and the Materials Science Division. From 1996 to 1999, Dr. Miranda was program director of the Kinetics and Catalysis Program at the National Science Foundation. His teaching encompassed tradi- tional chemical engineering courses, emphasizing graduate-level kinetics and reaction engineering, heterogeneous catalysis, engineering mathematics, solid- state chemical processing, and computational condensed-matter chemistry. His research interests are in catalytic-reaction mechanism identification. Dr. Miranda studied hydrogenation catalysis over self-assembled chirally modified surfaces, partial oxidation of alcohols and aldehydes over transition-metal oxide nanoparticles, and hydrotreatment of N-heteroaromatics over acidic supported transition-metal oxides. He is also interested in chemical microdevice technol- ogy, in particular the fabrication and characterization of solid-state microsen- sors. Dr. Miranda received his B.S. from the University of Cuyo in Argentina and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in Storrs. John Regalbuto is the director of the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program in the Directorate for Engineering in the National Science Foundation. Dr. Regalbuto’s

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102 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY education includes a B.S. in chemical engineering from Texas A&M University in 1981, and an M.S. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame in 1983 and 1986, respectively. Directly thereafter, he joined the University of Illinois at Chicago, his home institution, where he is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering. Dr. Regalbuto has several hundred research publications and presentations and most recently edited one of the few books in his research specialty, catalyst preparation. He has twice served as president of the Catalysis Club of Chicago and has been active in organizing symposia on catalysis for meetings for the American Institute of Chemical En- gineers and the American Chemical Society. Douglas Ray is interim deputy director for science and technology and associate laboratory director in the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). As deputy director, Dr. Ray is responsible for guiding the laboratory’s overall capability-development strate- gies, defining and advancing its science and technology portfolio, coordinating its scientific discretionary investments, and integrating its science and technol- ogy base to deliver essential scientific capability and accomplishments that ad- vance the Department of Energy’s missions. As associate laboratory director, he is responsible for PNNL’s Office of Science and National Institutes of Health research programs and directs more than 500 staff members in four research divisions: Atmospheric Sciences and Global Climate Change, Biological Sci- ences, Chemical & Materials Science, and Computational Sciences and Mathe- matics. Dr. Ray joined PNNL in 1990. He earned a B.S. in physics from Kala- mazoo College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. COMMITTEE Nancy B. Jackson (Co-chair) is the manager of the International Chemical Threat Reduction Department of Sandia National Laboratories (a National Nu- clear Security Administration laboratory managed and operated by Lockheed Martin). Dr. Jackson founded the department as the first partner of the U.S. De- partment of State to develop the Chemical Security Engagement Program, a scientific engagement program designed to raise the awareness of chemical se- curity and safety among chemical practitioners around the world. At Sandia, Dr. Jackson previously held the positions of deputy director of the International Se- curity Center; manager of the Chemical and Biological Sensing, Imaging & Analysis Department; and member of the technical staff leading heterogeneous catalysis research. Her technical experience lies primarily in imaging and in structure–property relationships of catalytic materials. Dr. Jackson earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from George Washington University and her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin. She is a

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103 APPENDIX B fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and re- cently served as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Chemical Society. Jens K. Nørskov (Co-chair) is professor of physics at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). In addition he serves as director of the Lundbeck Founda- tion’s Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design, chairman of the Nanotechnol- ogy Center at DTU, and chairman of the Danish Center for Scientific Comput- ing. Dr. Nørskov’s research interests span the theoretical description of surfaces, catalysis, materials, nanostructures, and biomolecules. He received his M.Sc. in physics and chemistry in 1976 and his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1979 from Aarhus University, Denmark. After experience at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, and the Nordic Institute of Theoretical Physics, Copenhagen, he joined the staff of Haldor Topsøe, Lyngby, Denmark, in 1985. In 1987, he received a special appointment as research professor by the Danish minister of education and joined DTU, where he was appointed profes- sor of physics in 1992. Dr. Nørskov has held visiting professorships at the Uni- versity of California Santa Barbara and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has received a number of awards, and is a member of Royal Danish Acad- emy of Science and letters and of the Danish Academy of the Technical Sci- ences. Mark A. Barteau (NAE) is senior vice provost for research and strategic initia- tives and Robert L. Pigford Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering of the University of Delaware. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford Uni- versity. He was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the Tech- nische Universität München before joining the University of Delaware faculty as an assistant professor of chemical engineering and associate director of the Cen- ter for Catalytic Science and Technology in 1982. He became director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology in 1996. In 2000, Dr. Barteau be- came the chairperson of the Department of Chemical Engineering. He also has held visiting appointments in chemical engineering at the University of Pennsyl- vania and in chemistry at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Dr. Barteau’s research, presented in more than 200 publications and a similar num- ber of invited lectures, focuses on chemical reactions at solid surfaces and their applications in heterogeneous catalysis. He was one of the pioneers in demon- strating the application of surface spectroscopy to study the mechanisms of or- ganic relations on single-crystal metal oxide surfaces, and such studies remain an important component of his research today. Dr. Barteau is the recipient of numerous awards, including the inaugural International Catalysis Award, pre- sented by the International Association of Catalysis Societies in 1998; the 1995 Ipatieff Prize from the American Chemical Society; the Paul H. Emmett Award in Fundamental Catalysis, given by the North American Catalysis Society; and

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104 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY the 1993 Canadian Catalysis Lecture Tour Award of the Catalysis Division of the Chemical Institute of Canada. He has served as associate editor of the AIChE Journal and on the editorial boards of a number of other journals, including the Journal of Catalysis. He was a member of the National Research Council com- mittee that produced the report Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006. Mark J. Cardillo is the executive director of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation. Dr. Cardillo received his B.S. from Stevens Institute of Technology in 1964 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Cornell University in 1970. He was a research associate at Brown University, a CNR research scientist at the Univer- sity of Genoa, and a PRF research fellow in the Department of Mechanical En- gineering of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1975, Dr. Cardillo joined Bell Laboratories as a member of the technical staff in the Surface Phys- ics Department. He was appointed head of the Chemical Physics Research De- partment in 1981 and later named head of the Photonics Materials Research De- partment. Most recently, he held the position of director of broadband access research. Dr. Cardillo is a fellow of the American Physical Society. He has been a Phillips Lecturer at Haverford College and a Langmuir Lecturer of the Ameri- can Chemical Society. He received the Medard Welch Award of the American Vacuum Society in 1987, the Innovations in Real Materials Award in 1998, and the Pel Associates Award in Applied Polymer Chemistry in 2000. Marcetta Y. Darensbourg is a professor of chemistry at Texas A&M Univer- sity. She received a B.S. from Union College Kentucky in 1963 and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana in inorganic chemistry in 1967. Her research focus is synthetic and mechanistic inorganic chemistry, including func- tioning models of catalytic active sites in bioinorganic–organometallic systems (nickel, iron, and cobalt). She was formerly a professor of inorganic chemistry at Tulane University and chair of the Inorganic Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) from 1988 to 1990. She has received the ACS Distinguished Ser- vice in Inorganic Chemistry Award, the Association of Former Students Teach- ing Award, and the Association of Former Students Research Award. Anne M. Gaffney is vice president of the Technology Development Center of Lummus Technology. Dr. Gaffney is involved in activities related to developing catalysts for use in the oil and gas, petroleum-refining, and petrochemical- process industries. Gaffney received bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Mount Holyoke College and a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the University of Delaware. She has been involved in industrial chemistry and chemical engineering for 25 years, contributing to the technology portfolios of Arco Chemical Company, DuPont, and Rohm and Haas, in addition to Lummus Technology.

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105 APPENDIX B Vernon C. Gibson is the Sir Edward Frankland BP Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at Imperial College. He studied for his D.Phil. under Malcolm Green at the University of Oxford and then spent two years as a NATO postdoctoral fellow with John Bercaw at the California Institute of Technology. He heads the catalysis and materials research section in the Chemistry Department at Impe- rial, where his main research interests have been the design of new catalyst sys- tems for the controlled synthesis of a number of industrially important classes of polymer. Dr. Gibson is a fellow of the Royal Society of London. He has recently taken up an appointment as Chief Chemist at BP, where he is responsible for providing strategic guidance and overview of the company’s chemical activities. Sossina M. Haile is a professor of materials science and chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology (CIT). She received her B.S. and Ph.D. (1992) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. from the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining the CIT faculty in 1996, Dr. Haile spent three years as an assistant professor at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Haile’s research centers on ionic conduction in solids with the twin objectives of understanding the mechanisms that govern ion transport and apply- ing the understanding to the development of advanced solid electrolytes and novel solid-state electrochemical devices. Technologic applications of fast-ion conductors include batteries, sensors, ion pumps, and fuel cells. It is to the latter that Dr. Haile’s work is most closely tied. Masatake Haruta is a member of the faculty of urban environmental sciences of Tokyo Metropolitan University. He graduated from Nagoya Institute of Technology with a major in industrial chemistry in 1970. He received his Ph.D. in industrial chemistry from Kyoto University in 1976; his work there concerned electrochemistry in hydrogen fluoride solvent. In 1976, he was employed as a research scientist by Osaka National Research Institute (ONRI), where he was involved in the catalytic combustion of hydrogen. He studied catalyst prepara- tion through colloid chemistry under Bernard Delmon’s guidance at the Univer- sité Catholique de Louvain in Belgium in 1981–1982. Since his return to ONRI, he has been studying the catalysis of gold nanoparticles. In 1994, he was pro- moted to head of the Catalysis Section, a science fellow, and head of the Inter- disciplinary Basic Research Laboratory. Dr. Haruta became director of the De- partment of Energy and the Environment in 1999. On the occasion of the transformation of national research institutes into semiautonomous bodies in 2001, he moved to Tsukuba as director of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Research Institute for Green Tech- nology. In 2005, he joined the Faculty of Urban Environmental Sciences of To- kyo Metropolitan University. During his career at AIST, he was a guest profes- sor at the Technical University of Vienna in 1994. He was also an adjunct professor of Osaka University from 1996 to 2005. Dr. Haruta pioneered a novel

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106 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY field of heterogeneous catalysis with the discovery of the unique catalytic per- formance of gold nanoparticles deposited on transition-metal oxides. He re- ceived the Osaka Science Prize, the Catalysis Society of Japan Science Award, and the International Precious Metals Institute Henry J. Albert Award. Nenad M. Markovic is a principal investigator and senior scientist at the Ar- gonne National Laboratory (ANL). He also is a group leader in the catalyst- development program for energy conversion and storage systems. Before joining ANL in 2005, he was a staff scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labo- ratory from 1991 to 2005 and a group leader at the Institute of Electrochemistry of the University of Belgrade, Serbia, from 1986 to 1991. Dr. Markovic received his B.Sc., Ms.D., and Ph.D. in technology engineering from the University of Belgrade. He was one of the pioneers in surface electrochemistry on well- characterized single-crystal surfaces and in the use of surface science to develop electrocatalysts. He now combines electrochemical methods with ex situ ultra- high-vacuum spectroscopy and in situ surface x-ray scattering, scanning tunnel- ing microscopy, and surface vibrational spectroscopy techniques in focusing on synthesis of anode and cathode catalysts for fuel-cell reactions, metal-deposition processes, and electrochemistry on transition-metal oxides. He is the author or coauthor of more than 200 papers and U.S. patents. Thomas A. Moore is a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Arizona State University (ASU) and director of the Center for the Study of Early Events in Photosynthesis in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He is the interim director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis in the Global Institute of Sustainability at ASU. He was awarded a Chaire Internationale de Recherche Blaise Pascal, Région d’Ile de France, Service de Bioénergétique, CEA Saclay, France, for the period 2005–2007. Dr. Moore has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Texas Tech University. He served as president of the American Society for Photobiology in 2004 and received the Senior Research Award from the society in 2001. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in biochemistry at ASU and lectures in biophysics at the Université de Paris Sud, Orsay. Dr. Moore’s research in artificial photosynthesis is aimed at the design, synthesis, and as- sembly of bioinspired constructs capable of sustainable energy production and use. Brendan D. Murray is a senior member of the Catalysts Department at Shell Oil Company. In addition, Dr, Murray is often asked to work closely with joint- venture partners and select global customers. In his 22 years at Shell, he has been involved in a number of commercial developments in the petrochemical and refining fields. His most important contributions have been in zeolite cataly- sis, novel catalytic processes, surfactants, and difficult separations. In 2007, Dr. Murray served as co-chair of the 20th North American Catalysis Society Meet- ing in Houston.

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107 APPENDIX B James C. Stevens is a research fellow in Core Research and Development at the Dow Chemical Company, where he has worked for 28 years. His primary field of research is new catalysts, particularly polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene– styrene copolymers, and organometallic single-site catalysts. Dr. Stevens has been involved in the discovery and commercial implementation of Dow’s INSITE technology and constrained-geometry catalysts, which are used in the production of over 2 billion pounds of polyolefins per year. He is an inventor on 82 issued U.S. patents, has 16 publications, and is the editor of one book. He has won a Dow Inventor of the Year Award five times and was presented the Dow Central Research Excellence in Science Award. In 1994, Dr. Stevens was a co- recipient of the U.S. National Inventor of the Year Award. In 2002, Dow was awarded the National Medal of Technology by President George W. Bush, in part on the basis of Dr. Stevens’s work in olefin polymerization catalysis. He is the 2004 recipient of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Delaware Section Carothers Award, which honors scientific innovators who have made out- standing advances in and contributions to industrial chemistry. He was awarded the ACS Award in Industrial Chemistry in 2006. Dr. Stevens also received the Herbert H. Dow Medal, the highest honor that Dow bestows on the company’s scientists and researchers. He recently received the 100th Perkin Medal, widely considered to be the highest honor in American industrial chemistry. He was the 2007 recipient of the University of Chicago Bloch Medal. Dr. Stevens received a B.A. in chemistry from the College of Wooster in 1975 and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Ohio State University in 1979. Barry M. Trost (NAS) is the Tamaki Professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Stanford University Department of Chemistry. His research interests include organic synthesis, catalysis, insect hormones and pheromones, antibiotics, anti- tumor agents, organic conductors, and the chemistry of sulfur, selenium, silicon, tin, palladium, and molybdenum. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1962 and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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108 CATALYSIS FOR ENERGY