Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Richard E. Carbone (Chair) is a senior scientist and director of the Institute for Integrative and Multidisciplinary Earth Studies (TIIMES) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. He has authored more than 100 scholarly works. A pioneer in meteorological radar, he has published on physical processes in clouds and storms, topographically-influenced circulations, predictability of warm season rainfall, and societal aspects of weather prediction. Mr. Carbone led the U.S. Weather Research Program and served as chairman of the World Meteorological Organization’s World Weather Research Programme. He was elected fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in 1994. Among other honors, Mr. Carbone received the 2001 AMS Cleveland Abbe Award for distinguished service to atmospheric science by an individual and the 2003 NCAR Publication Prize. He has served on several National Research Council committees including the Committee on Weather Forecasting Accuracy for FAA Air Traffic Control and the Panel on the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX).


James Block is chief meteorologist at DTN/Meteorlogix and has over 25 years of experience in commercial meteorology. At DTN/Meteorlogix, he is responsible for all of the weather content used in all of the DTN companies’ products and services. This includes weather forecasts and products used by over 150,000 businesses to make critical decisions. Mr. Block holds both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mr. Block has been a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) since 1976, and in 1989 he



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Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Richard E. Carbone (Chair) is a senior scientist and director of the Insti- tute for Integrative and Multidisciplinary Earth Studies (TIIMES) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. He has authored more than 100 scholarly works. A pioneer in meteoro- logical radar, he has published on physical processes in clouds and storms, topographically-influenced circulations, predictability of warm season rain- fall, and societal aspects of weather prediction. Mr. Carbone led the U.S. Weather Research Program and served as chairman of the World Meteoro- logical Organization’s World Weather Research Programme. He was elected fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) in 1994. Among other honors, Mr. Carbone received the 2001 AMS Cleveland Abbe Award for distinguished service to atmospheric science by an individual and the 2003 NCAR Publication Prize. He has served on several National Research Council committees including the Committee on Weather Forecasting Accu- racy for FAA Air Traffic Control and the Panel on the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). James Block is chief meteorologist at DTN/Meteorlogix and has over 25 years of experience in commercial meteorology. At DTN/Meteorlogix, he is responsible for all of the weather content used in all of the DTN com- panies’ products and services. This includes weather forecasts and products used by over 150,000 businesses to make critical decisions. Mr. Block holds both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Mr. Block has been a member of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) since 1976, and in 1989 he 

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 APPENDIX E was named a Certified Consulting Meteorologist (CCM) by the AMS. He was also elected to the National Council of Industrial Meteorologists (an organization of CCMs) in 1990, elected to its board of directors in 2000, and served as its president in 2002. Mr. Block has also served on the board of the Commercial Weather Services Association, a weather industry trade group. S. Edward Boselly is the founder and president of Weather Solutions Group, Inc., which provides consulting services to public and private entities to assist them in the reduction of the impact of weather on their operations and conducts research in and training for winter maintenance practices in highway agencies. He also served as the road weather program manager for the Washington State Department of Transportation from 2002 to 2005, integrating weather technologies into maintenance operations. Mr. Boselly has led numerous research projects and authored many publications related to road weather. From 1986 to 1993, he worked for the Matrix Manage- ment Group in Seattle, Washington, where he served as principal investi- gator on the National Academy of Sciences’ Strategic Highway Research Program investigation into the use of weather information for winter high- way maintenance activities. Mr. Boselly authored the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Guide for Snow and Ice Control, and served as principal investigator (PI) on seven snow and ice control projects for state departments of transportation. He also served as PI on three Transportation Research Board projects, including the Strategic Highway Research Program project investigating road weather informa- tion systems. Mr. Boselly also served 23 years as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force, retiring as a Lieutenant Colonel. Mr. Boselly is a mem- ber of the American Meteorological Society’s Committee on Interactive Information and Processing Systems; the AMS Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Surface Transportation Committee; the ITS America’s Weather Information Applications Special Interest Group; and the Ameri- can Public Works Association. He has also served on the National Weather Association’s corporate activities committee and as special advisor to the Council on Road Weather Initiatives. Mr. Boselly is considered among the founders of road weather management and is a frequent guest speaker on road weather related activities. He received his M.S. in meteorology from the University of Utah and B.S. degrees in both chemistry and atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. Gregory R. Carmichael, professor of chemical and biological engineer- ing at the University of Iowa, is a leader in the development of emissions inventories for natural and pollutant substances and of chemical transport models at scales ranging from local to global. He has worked extensively on

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 APPENDIX E issues of long-range transport of acidic and photochemical pollutants from Asia, and on the impact of Asian development on the environment. He is an active instructor and advisor, having supervised 29 M.S. and 24 Ph.D. students. Dr. Carmichael received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Kentucky in 1979. He has served as department chair and is co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research. He is presently chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the World Meteorological Organization Urban Environment Research Program and serves on the steering committee of the Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution. He has been a member and chair of the American Meteorological Society’s Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and on numerous other committees and boards. Dr. Carmichael has over 220 refereed journal publications and serves on a number of editorial boards. Frederick H. Carr is the Mark and Kandi McCasland Professor of Meteo- rology and the director of the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from Florida State University, followed by a postdoctoral appointment at State University of New York-Albany. His research interests include synoptic, tropical, and mesoscale meteorology, numerical weather prediction and data assimila- tion, and the use of new observing systems in diagnostic and numerical weather prediction studies. Dr. Carr has held visiting scientist positions at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis- tration’s (NOAA’s) Forecast Systems Laboratory. He is the associate direc- tor of the Center for the Analysis and Prediction of Storms at the University of Oklahoma and is also an associate director of Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Engi- neering Research Center. Carr is a fellow of the American Meteorologi- cal Society (AMS) and has served as chair of the AMS Board on Higher Education, a member of the AMS Council, and a member of the AMS Educational Advisory Committee, and he has also served as an editor of Monthly Weather Review. Dr. Carr was chair of the first COMET Advisory Panel and was named one of the 10 “Founders of COMET.” In addition, he has served on the NSF Committee of Visitors to evaluate ATM, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Nominating Committee (as chair), the North American Observing Systems committee, and NOAA External Review Panels of the Forecast Systems Laboratory and the Meso- scale Development Laboratory, and was co-organizer of the U.S. Weather Research Program Workshops on Data Assimilation and Mesoscale Observ- ing Systems.

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 APPENDIX E V. (Chandra) Chandrasekar is currently a professor at Colorado State Uni- versity (CSU). Dr. Chandrasekar has been involved with research and devel- opment of weather radar systems for over 20 years and has approximately 25 years of experience in radar systems. He has played a key role in devel- oping the CSU-CHILL National Radar facility as one of the most advanced meteorological radar systems available for research, and continues to work actively with the CSU-CHILL radar by supporting its research and educa- tion mission and by serving as co-principal investigator of the facility. In addition he also serves as the associate director of the newly established National science Foundation Engineering Research Center, Center for Col- laborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere. Dr. Chandrasekar’s current research funding includes National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) support for precipitation research. He is an avid experimentalist, conducting special experiments to collect in-situ observations to verify the new techniques and technologies. Dr. Chandrasekar is co-author of two textbooks, Polarimetric and Doppler Weather Radar and Probability and Random Processes. He has authored more than 85 journal articles and 150 conference publications and has served as academic advisor for more than 40 graduate students. His past National Research Council committee service includes the Committee on Weather Radar Technology beyond NEXRAD and the Committee on the Future of Rainfall Measuring Missions. He is the general chair for the 2006 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, and he has served on numerous review panels for various government agencies. He has received numerous awards including the NASA technical achievement award, and the ABELL Foundation Outstanding Researcher Award. He was elected a fellow of IEEE (Geo-Science and Remote Sensing) in recognition of his contributions to Quantitative Remote Sensing. Eve Gruntfest is a professor of geography and environmental studies at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. She has been working in the field of natural hazard mitigation for 30 years. She has published widely and is an internationally recognized expert in the specialty areas of warn- ing system development and flash flooding. She recently completed a year sabbatical, during which she worked at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) workshops for physical and social scientists dedicated to culture change within meteorology to actively incorporate social impacts into weather forecasting. The effort is called WAS*IS (Weather and Society Integrated Studies). As of November 2006 there are 85 WAS*ISers. She has spoken to many professional organizations in the United States, includ- ing the Association of State Floodplain Managers, the National Weather Service, the Hydrologic Engineering Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, COMET at NCAR, and the Forecast Systems Laboratory of the

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0 APPENDIX E National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She has participated in numerous workshops, sharing lessons from research on warning systems and flash flooding. Dr. Gruntfest received her B.A. in geography from Clark University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Raymond M. Hoff is a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He is also director of the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology. Dr. Hoff has 31 years of experience in atmospheric research. His research interests are in the optical properties of aerosols and gases in the atmosphere and the pathways and fates of toxic organic and elemental chemicals in the environment. Dr. Hoff has been central in formulating major research programs on differential absorption, airborne and space- borne lidar, volcanic emissions, atmospheric transport of toxic chemicals to the Great Lakes, atmospheric visibility, Arctic haze, and dispersion of pollutants. He has led or participated in more than 20 major field experi- ments. He is the author of 83 journal articles and book chapters, 94 other refereed works, and numerous public presentations of his work. Dr. Hoff obtained a B.A. in physics at the University of California, Berkeley in 1970 and a Ph.D. in physics from Simon Fraser University in 1975. He has had committee and peer review roles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Envi- ronment Canada, and the European Economic Community. He has held memberships in six scientific societies and served as chairman of committees for those societies. Witold F. Krajewski is the Rose and Joseph Summers Chair in Water Resources Engineering and professor of civil and environmental engineer- ing at the University of Iowa. He was a research hydrologist at the Office of Hydrology of the National Weather Service until 1987 when he joined the University of Iowa. Dr. Krajewski’s special fields of knowledge include hydrology and hydrometeorology, water resources systems, radar and satel- lite remote sensing, uncertainty modeling, and systems analysis. His present research interests include remote sensing of hydrologic processes, radar and satellite estimation of rainfall, statistical error structure of rainfall observations, real-time hydrometeorological forecasting, and uncertainty analysis in hydrology. Dr. Krajewski is a member of the Science Team of the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite mission, serves on the board of directors of Hydrologic Research Center, and is the University of Iowa representative to the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science. He is fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union. He has served on numerous com- mittees and panels of various professional organizations, and editorial

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 APPENDIX E boards of several journals. Currently he is an editor of Advances in Water Resources. He received his Ph.D. in water resources systems and his M.S. in environmental engineering from the Warsaw University of Technology. Margaret A. LeMone (NAE) is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). She has two primary scientific interests: the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere’s planetary boundary layer and its interaction with the underlying surface and clouds overhead, and the interaction of mesoscale convective with the boundary layer and surface underneath and with the surrounding atmosphere. Dr. LeMone is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Ameri- can Meteorological Society. She is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Cli- mate (BASC). She has served on the National Research Council’s Panel on Improving the Effectiveness of U.S. Climate Modeling, the Committee on Weather Research for Surface Transportation, and the Special Fields and Interdisciplinary Engineering Peer Committee of the NAE. She currently serves on the Committee on Challenges Strategic Guidance for NSF’s Sup- port of Research in the Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. LeMone received her Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. James F.W. Purdom is a senior research scientist at the Cooperative Insti- tute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University. Before joining CIRA, Dr. Purdom spent four years as Director of NOAA/ NESDIS’s Office of Research and Applications. His research focuses on remote sensing of the earth and its environment from space, as well as the development and evolution of atmospheric convection, with an emphasis on the study of mesoscale processes using satellite data. He received the Department of Commerce Silver Medal in 1994, the National Weather Association Special Award in 1996, and the American Meteorological Society Special Award in 1997. Purdom currently chairs the World Meteo- rological Organization’s Commission on Basic Systems Open Program Area Group on Global Observing Systems. Thomas W. Schlatter is an associate scientist with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a cooperative insti- tute between National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Colorado. Retired from government service, he now works part time at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory. He has been active for most of his career in the evaluation (including quality control) and use of many kinds of atmospheric observational data: surface- and space-based, in-situ and remotely sensed. His early work was in data assimilation methods for global forecasting, but in recent years he has con-

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 APPENDIX E centrated on data assimilation and prediction for mesoscale applications. Dr. Schlatter spent most of his career with NOAA, working on mesoscale data assimilation and prediction, mostly in the context of the Rapid Update Cycle, an operational system that generates hourly analyses of surface and tropospheric conditions and short-range predictions. He has been heavily involved in the NOAA Profiler Network and in planning for North Ameri- can upper air observing systems. He held several posts in the former Fore- cast Systems Laboratory: branch chief, division chief, and acting director for 6 months in 2004. He has written the “Weather Queries” column for Weatherwise magazine since 1980. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in meteorology from St. Louis University. Eugene S. Takle joined the Iowa State University faculty in 1971 and currently serves as professor of atmospheric science in the Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, professor of agricultural meteorol- ogy in the Department of Agronomy, and holds an affiliate appointment in the Department of Aerospace Engineering. He has a B.A. in physics and math from Luther College and a Ph.D. from the Iowa State Univer- sity Department of Physics. He is co-director of the Regional Climate Modeling Laboratory at Iowa State University that currently is centrally involved in developing future scenarios of regional climate change and impacts for the United States. He is primary or co-investigator on con- tracts with the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy totaling more than $3.7 million. His service on national and international boards and committees includes atmospheric science editor of Earth Science Reviews, associate editor of Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, and chair of the Transferability Working Group of the Hydrometeorology Panel of the World Climate Research Programme. He has more than 200 publications and research presentations on topics such as climate change, turbulent flow through agricultural shelterbelts, and roadway weather. Although the primary focus of these research reports is numerical modeling and analysis of mesoscale and microscale flow, he also has been engaged in boundary-layer field experiments studying flow characteristics in the vicinity of shelterbelts and the role of atmospheric processes in “pressure pumping” of trace gases in soils. The Iowa Environmental Mesonet was initially established in 2001 under a grant from USDA with Professor Takle as co-principal investigator. His online course titled Global Change was introduced in 1995 as Iowa State’s first and longest running internet- based course. Since January of 2006 he also serves as Faculty Director of the University Honors Program.

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 APPENDIX E Jay Titlow is a senior meteorologist with WeatherFlow Inc. He has a B.S. in meteorology from North Carolina State University and an M.S. in geography from the University of Delaware. Mr. Titlow’s meteorologi- cal and oceanographic professional experience encompasses positions at the College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware, Louisiana State University, and two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facilities (Goddard Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center). For the past 10 years, he helped build WeatherFlow from a small regional sailing weather service to a national business offering commercial marine meteorological products with over 60,000 customers nationwide. The cornerstone of this successful business model is WeatherFlow’s national coastal mesonet. This expanding network now numbers over 300 sites on both U.S. coasts, the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, plus sites in Mexico and Canada. The increasingly diversified group of users includes an operational feed of WeatherFlow national mesonet to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for use in hazardous plume modeling. Mr. Titlow’s posi- tion responsibilities at WeatherFlow include mesonet engineering (siting, installation, data quality control, and maintenance), leading product devel- opment, and special projects. One sample project included a leadership role in the DTRA-sponsored The Sea Port of Debarkation (SPOD) Vulnerability and Ship Protection in the Littoral Region Weather Model Experiment that occurred during the summer of 2001. Among the numerous tasks associated with this project included leading the installation of the regional mesonet used for the experiment. More recently, Mr. Titlow has been leading a project with the City of Boston Police Department involving installation of 20 mesoscale monitoring sites within the metro area to aid in improving hazardous plume tracking. NRC Staff Curtis H. Marshall is a senior program officer with the Board on Atmo- spheric Sciences and Climate (BASC). He received B.S. (1995) and M.S. (1998) degrees in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and a Ph.D. (2004) in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. His doctoral research, which examined the impact of anthropogenic land-use change on the mesoscale climate of the Florida peninsula, was featured in Nature and the New York Times. Prior to joining the staff of BASC in 2006, he was employed as a research scientist in the National Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Administration. Since joining the staff of BASC, he has directed peer reviews for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and staffed studies on mesoscale meteorological observing systems, weather radar, the NPOESS spacecraft, and the impacts of climate change on human health.

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 APPENDIX E Rob Greenway is a senior program assistant at the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He has worked on National Research Council studies that produced the reports Assessment of the Benefits of Extending the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: A Perspec- tive from the Research and Operations Communities, Review of NOAA’s Plan for the Scientific Stewardship Program, Where the Weather Meets the Road: A Research Agenda for Improving Road Weather Services, and Completing the Forecast: Characterizing and Communicating Uncertainty for Better Decisions Using Weather and Climate Forecasts, among others. He received his A.B. in English and his M.Ed. in English education from the University of Georgia.