TABLE 6-1 Responses to NIH and NRC Surveys (combined), by Venture Capital and Multiple-award Status

 

 

Top 200 Phase II Winners

Others

Total

VC-funded

Number of awards

171

182

353

Number of responses

42

73

115

Not VC-funded

Number of awards

980

1,575

2,555

Number of responses

234

756

990

Total

Number of awards

1,151

1,757

2,908

Number of responses

276

829

1,105

SOURCE: Awards—U.S. Small Business Administration Tech-Net Database; Responses—NRC Phase II Survey and NIH Phase II Survey and updates.

  • Firms among the top 200 NIH Phase II award winners 1992-2002, who also received sufficient venture funding to meet the de minimis conditions. (42 responses.)

  • Firms among the top 200 NIH Phase II award winners that did not receive sufficient venture funding to meet the de minimis conditions. (234 responses.)

  • Firms not among the top 200 NIH Phase II award winners 1992-2002, who also received sufficient venture funding to meet the de minimis conditions. (73 responses.)

  • Firms not among the top 200 NIH Phase II award winners that did not receive sufficient venture funding to the de minimis conditions. (756 responses.)

Recall that the de minimis conditions refer to more than one round of venture funding OR more than $5 million in venture funding. These conditions, and the number of relevant responses, are captured in Table 6-1.

Just under 10 percent of responses overall came from firms which were venture-funded. The chart summarizes the combined responses to questions about sales from SBIR-funded projects,4 from the NRC and NIH Phase II surveys.5 The data indicate that venture-funded firms responded slightly less frequently to these surveys, generating a combined response rate of 32.6 percent, as against a rate of 38.7 percent for firms without venture funding. Overall, 23 percent of responses came from firms in the top 200 award winners.

4

Response rates to both surveys vary by question.

5

While there is likely to be some overlap in responses, this is less likely for firms which won more than one award, and unlikely for firms with several awards. Thus, the data for the top 200 firms is likely to contain fewer duplicate entries. However, there is no way to exclude these duplicate entries, and it appears that these do not substantially affect outcomes.



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