Appendix A
Biographies of Speakers*

M. S. ANANTH

Dr. M. S. Ananth is the director of the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras. He graduated from the AC College of Technology with a gold medal in chemical engineering and obtained his Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering in the area of molecular thermodynamics from the University of Florida in 1972.

He joined IIT-Madras as a faculty in the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1972. He has held various senior positions including head of the department, dean of academic courses, and dean of academic research. Appointed as the director of IIT-Madras in December 2001, he has played a key role in preparing The Strategic Plan of IIT-Madras—Vision 2010.

Dr. Ananth was a visiting professor at Princeton University (1982-1983) and at the University of Colorado (1990-1991). He was a visiting scientist in the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado (1990-1991), in RWTH in Aachen, Germany (Summer 1983 and Summer 1999), and a visiting thermodynamics expert at Aspen Tech in Massachusetts (Summer 1991).

Dr. Ananth has taught a whole range of chemical engineering courses and has been consistently rated as a good teacher. He is well known for his deep concern for his students. He was responsible for extensive curricular revisions in the B.Tech. program of IIT-Madras with the introduction of many innovative features. He is also deeply concerned about the quality and reach of engineering education in India. He is the national coordinator for a mega project funded by

*

As of March 2008. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium.



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Appendix A Biographies of Speakers* M. S. ANANTH Dr. M. S. Ananth is the director of the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras. He graduated from the AC College of Technology with a gold medal in chemical engineering and obtained his Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering in the area of molecular thermodynamics from the University of Florida in 1972. He joined IIT-Madras as a faculty in the Department of Chemical Engineer- ing in 1972. He has held various senior positions including head of the depart- ment, dean of academic courses, and dean of academic research. Appointed as the director of IIT-Madras in December 2001, he has played a key role in preparing The Strategic Plan of IIT-Madras—Vision 2010. Dr. Ananth was a visiting professor at Princeton University (1982-1983) and at the University of Colorado (1990-1991). He was a visiting scientist in the Na - tional Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado (1990-1991), in RWTH in Aachen, Germany (Summer 1983 and Summer 1999), and a visiting thermodynamics expert at Aspen Tech in Massachusetts (Summer 1991). Dr. Ananth has taught a whole range of chemical engineering courses and has been consistently rated as a good teacher. He is well known for his deep concern for his students. He was responsible for extensive curricular revisions in the B.Tech. program of IIT-Madras with the introduction of many innovative features. He is also deeply concerned about the quality and reach of engineering education in India. He is the national coordinator for a mega project funded by ∗As of March 2008. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium. 1

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1 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS the MHRD, on Technology Enhanced Learning involving many technical institu - tions in the country. Dr. Ananth’s research interests are in molecular thermodynamics and math - ematical modeling. He has published several papers in international journals and is a referee for many journals in chemical engineering. He has been awarded the Herdillia prize for excellence in basic research in chemical engineering by the Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers and the R.W. Fahien Alumni Award for “Distinguished Professional Contributions” for the year 2003 by the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Florida. He is a fellow of the Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Indian National Academy of Engineer- ing. He is also a member of the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council (NMCC) and a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Cabinet. He is a consultant for many chemical industries in South India. JAMES BARKER Clemson University’s 14th president, James F. Barker, is first and foremost an architect. He came to the office with a clear blueprint of Clemson’s future in mind—to become one of the nation’s top public universities. To achieve this vi- sion, Mr. Barker led the development of 10-year goals and an action plan built around collaboration, focus, relevance, and academic quality. The results speak for themselves: Today, Clemson is considered an academic rising star, more than doubling research in just 3 years, launching major new eco- nomic development initiatives, dramatically increasing the quality of the student body, and rising to a number 27 ranking among the nation’s top public universi - ties. For his leadership, Mr. Barker has been honored with the Buck Mickel Award for Business and Community Leadership by the Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce, the Anderson Independent-Mail’s Pointing the Way Leadership Award, Greenille Magazine’s The Cliff’s Business Person of the Year Award, and the Order of the Palmetto—the state’s highest civilian honor. He also was inducted into the Boys and Girls Clubs Hall of Fame. Mr. Barker has emerged as a national leader in academic and public service arenas. He currently serves on the NCAA Board of Directors, chairing the Divi- sion I Committee, and is past-president of the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the region’s accrediting agency, which recently honored him with the James F. Rogers Meritorious Service Award. He was awarded the Executive Leadership Award from the Council for Advance - ment and Support of Education District III and has been awarded honorary doctoral degrees from S.C. State University and Mars Hill College. He also has served on the Truman Scholars selection committee, was a Cambridge University visiting scholar, and is a member of the Shaw Group Board of Directors, serving on the Audit Committee. Mr. Barker is a recipient of the National Distinguished Professor Award of

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15 APPENDIX A the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and served as president of that association. He was named fellow of the American Institute of Architects and has also been a partner in an architectural practice. As president, Mr. Barker remains committed to the classroom. Each spring, he is part of a team that teaches an undergraduate course exploring “a sense of place” in architecture, literature, and history. Mr. Barker, a native of Kingsport, Tennessee, earned his bachelor of archi- tecture degree from Clemson in 1970 and his master of architecture and urban design degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1973. JEFF BINGAMAN Jeff Bingaman grew up in Silver City in a family with deep New Mexico small town roots. His father was a science professor at Western New Mexico University, and his mother taught in the public schools. He graduated from high school in Silver City. After graduating from Harvard University, he earned a law degree at Stanford. There he met fellow law student Anne Kovacovich. After graduation, they married and returned to New Mexico, where they both practiced law, and their son, John, was born. Senator Bingaman was elected New Mexico Attorney General in 1978. In 1982, he won election to the United States Senate, and in 2006, was re-elected to serve a fifth term. Committees and Responsibilities • Energy and Natural Resources Committee, chairman • Finance Committee o Subcommittee on Energy, Natural Resources, and Infrastructure, chairman o Subcommittee on International Trade and Global Competitiveness o Subcommittee on Health Care • Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee o Subcommittee on Children and Families o Subcommittee on Retirement and Aging • Joint Economic Committee, senior member JANE DAVIES Jane Davies was appointed chief executive of Manchester Science Park (MSP) in October 2000 and was elected president of the European Division of the International Association of Science Parks (IASP) in 2006. Ms. Davies is also chairman of the UK Science Park Association (UKSPA). Ms. Davies has a degree in chemistry from St. Anne’s College, Oxford,

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16 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS and joined BP Chemicals as a PVC plant chemist on graduation. She spent 18 years with BP in a range of roles including international oil trader in New York and regional manager of BP’s international aviation business, Air BP. During this period she also spent two years on secondment to the FCO Planning Staff. On leaving BP, Jane ran the Buxton Festival for four years, where she gained valuable experience in running a micro business with insufficient resources— circumstances that many of her tenants have to deal with. In Ms. Davies’ time at MSP, the company has expanded its operations to facilities on four sites in Manchester and has invested in people and processes to strengthen the links between its tenant companies and its university shareholders. The science park and its tenants are seen as an important part of Manchester’s knowledge economy. PETER ENGARDIO Pete Engardio is a senior writer for BusinessWeek, focusing on global busi- ness and economic trends. Mr. Engardio joined BusinessWeek in 1985 as a correspondent in the mag- azine’s Atlanta bureau. In 1987 he moved to Miami as bureau manager. In 1990 he became a correspondent in the Hong Kong bureau, where he covered Asian business for six years. In 1996 he moved to New York as an Asian editor. From 1998 to 2001, he was editor of the Asian Edition. In 2005, Mr. Engardio anchored BusinessWeek’s special issue “China & India: What You Need to Know,” winner of the Institute for Political Journalism Award. His 2004 cover “The China Price” won an Overseas Press Club (OPC) Award. In 2003, he anchored two groundbreaking covers on offshore outsourcing of skilled work, “Is Your Job Next” and the “Rise of India,” for which he received George Polk, Loeb, and Sigma Delta Chi awards, and was named a finalist for a National Magazine Award. The pieces sparked congressional hearings and a national debate on outsourcing. He also won a Harry Chapin award sponsored by World Hunger Year for his 2002 cover “Fighting Poverty” and a Clarion Award and OPC citation in 2001 for his cover “Global Capitalism: Can it be Made to Work Better?” In 1996, he received an OPC Award for his international cover story, “China’s New Elite.” In 1997 he received an OPC citation for “Asia: Time for a Reality Check,” written as he was finishing his Hong Kong tour, and he was part of the BusinessWeek Asia Team that won a 1998 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of Asia in Crisis. Prior to joining BusinessWeek, Mr. Engardio was a feature editor for Busi- ness Korea in Seoul, as well as a stringer for BusinessWeek. Before that, he worked for the Bay City News Service in San Francisco and the San Francisco Bay Guardian. Mr. Engardio edited and wrote opening chapters for the book Chindia: How China and India are Reolutionizing Global Business, published in 2007

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1 APPENDIX A by McGraw-Hill, and is co-author with Mark L. Clifford of Meltdown: Asia’s Boom, Bust, and Beyond, published in 2000 by Prentice-Hall. Mr. Engardio’s recent speaking appearances include McGill University and HEC business school (Montreal), the Conference Board (New York), National Public Radio, CNN International, CNBC, the Center for Global Development (Washington, DC), and Duke University. In 2004, Mr. Engardio was a Reuters Journalism Fellow at Oxford Univer- sity. He holds a B.A. from Central Michigan University and an M.A. from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. CHRISTINA GABRIEL Christina Gabriel joined The Heinz Endowments in 2006 with extensive experience in research management, university-industry collaboration, and tech - nology transfer. She is responsible for the foundation’s efforts to capitalize on the research strengths of the region’s universities, medical centers, corporate and government laboratories to promote economic growth and opportunity in south- western Pennsylvania. After receiving her doctorate in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Dr. Gabriel began her professional career conducting experimental research at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. Her work focused on lasers, optical fibers and thin-film wave- guide devices for telecommunications, switching and computing applications. She holds three patents. Dr. Gabriel later joined the National Science Foundation, first to direct industry-university collaborative centers programs and later as deputy head of the $350-million engineering directorate. While in Washington, DC, she spent about a year on Capitol Hill as a professional staff member for the U.S. Senate Commit- tee on Appropriations. She also has been a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo in Japan. From 1998 to 2006, she worked at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, eventually becoming vice provost and chief technology officer. Dr. Gabriel received both her master’s and doctoral degrees from MIT and her undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. She has been a review panelist and advisor for the National Science Foundation and the National Academies and serves on the MIT Corporation Visiting Com- mittee on Sponsored Research. In Pittsburgh, she has served on several nonprofit boards and as an external technology advisor for the Pittsburgh Public Schools’ strategic planning process. She was an AT&T Bell Laboratories GRPW Fellow and a national merit scholar.

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18 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS MARY GOOD Mary L. Good is the Donaghey University Professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and serves as dean for the College of Information Science and Systems Engineering. She is managing member for the Fund for Arkansas’ Future, LLC (an investment fund for startup and early-stage companies), past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, past president of the ACS, and an elected member of the National Academy of Engi- neering. She presently serves on the Boards of Acxiom, Inc., St. Vincent Health System, and Delta Bank and Trust. Previously she served a four-year term as the Under Secretary for Tech- nology for the Technology Administration in the Department of Commerce, a presidentially appointed, Senate-confirmed position. In addition, she chaired the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Technological Inno - vation (NSTC/CTI), and served on the NSTC Committee on National Security. Previously she has served as the senior vice president for technology for Allied Signal and as the Boyd Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science at Louisiana State University. Dr. Good was appointed to the National Science Board by President Carter in 1980 and by President Reagan in 1986. She was the chair of that board from 1988 to 1991, when she received an appointment by President Bush to be a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Dr. Good has received many awards, including the National Science Foun- dation’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the American Institute of Chemists’ Gold Medal, the Priestly Medal from the American Chemical Society, and the Vannevar Bush Award from the National Science Board, among others. Dr. Good received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in inorganic chemistry from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. DAVID HOLDEN David Holden is responsible for strategic marketing for the Minatec center, located in Grenoble, France. As a member of the core management team, Dr. Holden actively identifies and engages international partners as part of the strategic development plan for the center. In particular, his focus is on commercialization and technology transfer with private enterprise in the areas of nanotechnology, microsystems, renewable energy, and new technologies for healthcare. Prior to joining CEA in 2003, Dr. Holden provided consulting services to commercial microsystems providers in the United States and Europe on technolo- gies for inertial sensors, biochips, and inkjet printing technology. From 1999 to 2001, he was responsible for polymer microfluidics development for inkjet prod - ucts at Xerox Research, with several successful technology platforms transferred

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1 APPENDIX A to commercial production. From 1993 to 1999, Dr. Holden was involved with various startup companies in flat-panel display technologies, including Pixtech, AVT, and ADT, a Robert Bosch GmbH development stage subsidiary based in Stuttgart. Dr. Holden began his professional career in 1986 as a process engineer at General Electric corporate R&D where he developed TFT LCD technology that he later transferred to Thomson in France. Dr. Holden received his MBA from INSEAD (1993) and a B.S. in materials science and engineering from Cornell University (1986). As a representative of the MINATEC center, Dr. Holden frequently rep- resents the activities of the greater Grenoble area, highlighting links between research, education and industry to stimulate economic development in the high- tech sector. VICTOR LECHTENBERG Victor L. Lechtenberg was named Purdue University’s interim provost in July 2007. He succeeds Sally Mason, who left Purdue to become president of the University of Iowa. Since 2004, Dr. Lechtenberg had served as Purdue’s vice provost for en- gagement, working to align the university’s intellectual and other resources to assist in Indiana’s economic growth and to address challenges facing the state’s business and industry. Prior to that, he served for 10 years as Purdue’s dean of agriculture. As interim provost, Dr. Lechtenberg is responsible for oversight of campus management in research, engagement, teaching, and related academic activities in coordination with the Office of the President. His office also oversees academic systems such as the libraries, computing center, and student services. Dr. Lechtenberg has been an active leader on both state and national levels with respect to research and technology policy. He has also been an advocate for technology-related economic growth in the food, agriculture, and natural resource sectors. He chaired the USDA’s National Agricultural Research, Extension, Edu - cation, and Economics Advisory Board from 1996 to 2002. In addition, Dr. Lechtenberg has served as president of the Crop Science Society of America and as president of the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). He is a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America. He also recently served on the National Acad - emies Division of Earth and Life Studies Committee and currently serves on the National Academies Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Lechtenberg received his B.S. degree in 1967 from the University of Nebraska, where he was an agriculture honors program graduate. He received his Ph.D. in agronomy from Purdue University in 1971.

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150 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS YENA LIM Ms. Yena Lim joined the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) in June 2006. She assumed the position of managing director A*STAR in January 2007. A*STAR has 232 staff in corporate headquarters, 3,267 scien - tists and researchers and related research support staff at the research institutes, and 69 staff focusing on R&D commercialization. The organization strives to foster world-class scientific research and talent for a vibrant knowledge-based economy by strengthening the stock of human, intellectual, and industrial capital. It has a budget of S$5.4 billion over 5 years to undertake R&D activities and to carry out its strategies. A*STAR is Singapore’s lead agency for fostering world-class scientific research and talent for a vibrant knowledge-based Singapore. A*STAR actively nurtures public-sector research and development in biomedical sciences, phys - ical sciences, and engineering, with a particular focus on fields essential to Singapore’s manufacturing industry and new growth industries. It oversees 14 research institutes and supports extramural research with the universities, hospital research centers, and other local and international partners. At the heart of this knowledge-intensive work is human capital. Top local and international scientific talent drive knowledge creation at A*STAR research institutes. The agency also sends scholars for undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral training in the best universities, a reflection of the high priority A*STAR places on nurturing the next generation of scientific talent. Before A*STAR, Ms. Lim was with the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI), as the director of its Resource Division. She oversaw economic policies pertaining to competitiveness and capability development for the economy. This included industrial land use planning and policies, energy security and reforms in the electricity and gas markets, support of manpower development and re- search and development strategies to support economic growth. Her team at MTI came up with the Science and Technology Plan 2010 in close collaboration with A*STAR and other agencies. They also provided staff support to the Ministerial Committee on Research and Development that resulted in the creation of the Research, Innovation and Enterprise Council chaired by PM, and the National Research Foundation. As an officer of the Administrative Service, Ms. Lim has also worked in the Ministry of Transport overseeing the land transport portfolio; the Public Service Division of the Prime Minister’s Office looking after human resources policies for the civil service; the Ministry of Education overseeing the school physical infrastructure planning and development portfolio and higher education policy; and the Ministry of Finance covering the Government’s fiscal policy, including revenue and taxation policies. Ms. Lim has served on the boards of Sentosa Development Corporation, Jurong Port, Nanyang Polytechnic, the Singapore-MIT alliance, the Duke-NUS

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151 APPENDIX A Graduate Medical School, and the Workforce Development Agency, and she is currently on the board of A*STAR and a panel member of the Enterprise Challenge. ALBERT LINK Albert N. Link is professor of economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Richmond and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Tulane University. His research focuses on innovation policy, university entrepreneurship, and the economics of R&D. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Technology Transfer. Professor Link’s most recent books include: The Economic Theory of Inention and Inno- ation (Edward Elgar, 2008), Cyber Security: Economic Strategies and Public Policy Alternaties (Edward Elgar, 2008), Entrepreneurship, Innoation, and Technological Change (Oxford University Press, 2007), Public/Priate Partner- ships (Springer, 2006), and Ealuating Public Research Institutions (Springer, 2005). In addition, he is the author of the two-volume history of Research Triangle Park in North Carolina: A Generosity of Spirit: The Early History of the Research Triangle Park (1995) and From Seed to Harest: The Growth of the Research Triangle Park (2002), both published by the University of North Carolina Press for the Research Triangle Foundation of North Carolina. Much of Professor Link’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the OECD, the World Bank, and various science and technology ministries in developed nations. Currently, Professor Link is serving as the vice-chairperson of the Innovation and Competitiveness Policies Committee of the United Nation’s Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). ROBERT MCMAHAN Robert McMahan is senior advisor to the Governor of North Carolina for science and technology and the executive director of the North Carolina Board of Science and Technology. In this role he advises the Governor, the Secretary of Commerce, the General Assembly, and the Boards of Science and Technology and Economic Development about science and technology matters and supports and advises the state government on science, technology, entrepreneurship and technology-based economic development. He also serves as the primary liaison to the University of North Carolina System, the SBTDC, the NC Community College System, other private colleges and universities, key agencies such as the Biotechnology Center and MCNC, and associations such as CED, NCTA, and NCBIO with regard to these issues. Prior to this Dr. McMahan was a senior technology strategist for In-Q-Tel, a private venture capital organization funded by the CIA and NIMA, where he was part of a team responsible for developing a technology investment strategy

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152 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS for the CIA, and then deriving, molding, and structuring individual investments and technologies within the portfolio. Before joining In-Q-Tel, he was executive vice president of engineering/research and development for the Swiss-based, mid-cap GretagMacbeth, LLC, where he was responsible for the company’s world-wide research, engineering, and product development activities and for the creation and operation of the company’s Advanced Technology Laboratories in the Research Triangle Park. He joined GretagMacbeth after its acquisition in 2000 of McMahan Research Laboratories, the advanced technologies company for which he was president and CEO and which he founded in 1987 in Cambridge, MA, and expanded to the RTP in 1989. Dr. McMahan has been involved in the creation of a number of technology startups, and he has participated in equity and LBO capital raises. In addition to his duties with the state, Dr. McMahan also currently holds the positions of research professor of physics and astronomy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he teaches and conducts research in cosmology, instrumentation, and the large-scale structure of the universe, and adjunct professor of technology and management at the North Carolina State University College of Textiles. Dr. McMahan received bachelor’s degrees in physics and in the history of art from Duke University in 1982, a Ph.D. degree in physics from Dartmouth in 1986, and a postdoctoral fellowship from the Harvard University/Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Center for Astrophysics. He has published over forty papers in scientific and engineering journals, sits on a number of state and corporate boards and commissions, and holds multiple patents in the field. C. D. MOTE, JR. Currently the president of the University of Maryland, C. D. “Dan” Mote, Jr., spent most of his life in Berkeley. He attended two grammar schools there, earned three degrees in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and spent 31 years on the faculty. He was chair of the mechanical engineering department, held an endowed chair in mechanical systems and then became vice chancellor for university relations in order to create and lead Berkeley’s compre - hensive capital campaign to raise $1.1 billion by 2001. Dr. Mote’s research lies in dynamic systems and biomechanics. Internation - ally recognized for work on the dynamics of high-speed rotating and translating materials and the biomechanics of snow skiing injuries, he has authored and co- authored more than 300 publications, holds patents in the United States, Norway, Finland, and Sweden, and mentored 56 Ph.D. students while at the University of California. In 1998 Dr. Mote was appointed president of the University of Maryland and Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering. He was recruited to lead the University of Maryland to national eminence under a mandate by the state.

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15 APPENDIX A He is now leading a $1-billion capital campaign so that Maryland can maintain affordable access for state residents. His goals call for the university to lead the state in the development of its high-tech economy, especially in information, bioscience and biotechnology, energy, language, security, and nanotechnology. He has greatly expanded the uni - versity’s partnerships with federal laboratories and inaugurated the first research park sponsored by the People’s Republic of China outside the mainland. China also founded its first international Chinese language, literature, and culture center at Maryland. Under his leadership, the university founded a research park on 128 acres adjacent to the campus with 3 million square feet of development potential, making it the largest park in Maryland and Greater Washington. The NOAA National Center for Weather and Climate Prediction will be located there. President Mote received the Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Berkeley Citation, and he was named a distinguished engineering alumnus. He has received three honorary doctorates, is a member and councilor of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and has received its prestigious Founder’s Award. He was elected to honorary membership in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International, and he received the Humboldt Prize of the Federal Republic of Germany. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Acoustical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. JOHN NIEDERHUBER John E. Niederhuber, M.D., became director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in September 2006. Prior to that he had been the Institute’s acting direc - tor from June 2006. He was formerly a professor of surgery and oncology at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. Dr. Niederhuber served the Univer- sity of Wisconsin as the director of the University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center from July 1997 until October 2002. He came to the University of Wisconsin in 1997 from Stanford University where he had served as chair of the Department of Surgery. In June 2002, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Niederhuber chair of the National Cancer Advisory Board, a position he held until resigning to become the deputy director at NCI in 2005. Dr. Niederhuber’s research at NCI focuses on the study of tissue stem cells as the cell-of-origin for cancer. His lab is working to identify, characterize fully, and isolate this population of cells with the hypothesis that such cells might be the required therapeutic target. His lab is also studying the viral cancer vector HPV, to identify the binding site theorized to be a stem cell epithelial receptor. Dr. Niederhuber is a nationally recognized cancer surgeon with a special clinical emphasis in gastrointestinal cancer, hepatobiliary cancer, and breast cancer. He is recognized for his pioneering work in hepatic artery infusion

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15 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS chemotherapy and was the first to demonstrate the feasibility of totally implant - able vascular access devices. Dr. Niederhuber is a graduate of Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia, and the Ohio State University School of Medicine. He was an NIH academic trainee in Surgery at the University of Michigan (1969-1970) and a visiting fellow, Division of Immunology, The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden (1970-1971). He completed his training in surgery at the University of Michigan in 1973. He was a member of the faculty of the University of Michigan from 1973 to 1987, being promoted to professor of microbiology/immunology and professor of surgery in 1980. JAIME PARADA Appointed in September 2007, Mr. Parada is the president and CEO of the Program Monterrey City of Knowledge and of the Institute of Innovation and Technology Transfer of Nuevo Leon, responsible for the Research and Innova- tion Technology Park. From December 2000 to 2005, Mr. Parada was the direc- tor general of the National Council on Science and Technology (CONACYT), Mexico’s equivalent to a Ministry of Science and Technology. CONACYT is the cabinet-level agency directly answerable to the president, responsible for science and technology policy in Mexico and entrusted with the task of funding R&D activities through several institutional funds, graduate scholarships for Mexican students, and the National Researcher’s System, whereby top researchers get supplemental funding to support their research activities. CONACYT also co - ordinates 27 research centers in all fields of knowledge, as well as the National Science and Technology Registry and Mexico’s tax incentive scheme for compa- nies involved in R&D. Mr. Parada graduated as a mechanical-electrical engineer from UNAM’s College of Engineering. He took postgraduate and specialization courses in both Mexican and foreign institutions in the areas of strategic planning, quality assurance systems, manufacturing systems, research and technological development, technology management, and teaching and teaching methods. He has 25 years of experience in the fields of Technological R&D in the government, academy, research areas, and private enterprises. PHILLIP H. PHAN Phillip H. Phan is Warren H. Bruggeman ‘46 and Pauline Urban Bruggeman Distinguished Professor of Management at the Lally School of Management & Technology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He was the 2004/2005 Haniel Foundation Visiting Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin and is the 2006/2007 Robert Bosch Foundation Public Policy Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He is the summer 2007/2008 visiting research professor at Singapore Management University.

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155 APPENDIX A In 2007/2008 Dr. Phan published three books including Theoretical Adances in Family Enterprise Research (InfoAge Press), Entrepreneurship and Economic Deelopment in Emerging Regions (Edward Elgar), and Taking Back the Board- room (2nd ed) (Imperial College Press). His areas of research are in innovation and technology transfer, corporate governance in strategic alliances, and entre - preneurial market-entry strategies. Dr. Phan has published more than 80 research articles in such journals as the Academy of Management Journal, Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Corporate Goernance, European Management Journal, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management, Research Policy, IEEE Transactions Engineering Management, and Small Business Economics. He served on the editorial review board of the Academy of Management Journal and is now associate editor for the Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of Financial Stability, and Journal of Technology Transfer. Dr. Phan has consulted for the World Bank, OECD, Singapore Institute of Directors, U.S. Small Business Administration, and such companies as Motorola, HP, IBM, Ernst & Young, Metsaliitto (Finland), Pillsbury, Finlombardia (Italy), Agilent Technologies, SK Group (Korea), SanomaWSOY (Finland), Singapore Airlines, PACCAR (United States), and technology venture capital firms in To - ronto and New York. Dr. Phan has been a regular expert contributor to CNBC, Bloomberg News, CNNOnline, the Wall Street Journal, and various regional and national print and media outlets in Singapore, Germany, and Canada. LAWRENCE SCHUETTE Dr. Schuette entered the Senior Executive Service in July 2007 and is cur- rently the senior civilian responsible for innovation at the Office of Naval Re - search. This portfolio includes the Innovative Naval Prototypes and Swampworks projects. These are high-risk/high-payoff technology investments that are poten - tially “game changing” or “disruptive” in nature. From September 2006 to July 2007, he served as a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research Development and Acquisition. As a special assistant, Dr. Schuette focused on in-house RDT&E workforce issues. Dr. Schuette served as the deputy chairman of the Joint IED Defeat Orga - nization (JIEDDO) Laboratory Board from March 2006 to September 2006. In this capacity, Dr. Schuette created the science and technology strategy used by JIEDDO to combat improvised explosive devices. Dr. Schuette headed the Innovative Systems Subgroup of the OSD Techni- cal Joint Cross Service Group during Base Realignment and Closure 2005 from August 2003 to August 2005. Dr. Schuette was responsible for assessing and recommending for potential consolidation and closure of the research activities of the Department of Defense.

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156 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS He started his 20 years of civilian service in 1987 as a research scientist in the Acoustics Division of the Naval Research Laboratory working on advanced signal processing and computer visualization. Dr. Schuette attended The Catholic University of America and graduated in 1983 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. Following graduation, he worked on underwater fiber optic sensors as a contractor at the Naval Research Laboratory in the Acoustics Division. Dr. Schuette completed his master’s de- gree in electrical engineering at The Catholic University of America in 1985. In 1995, Dr. Schuette received his Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America in electrical engineering. Dr. Schuette’s awards include the Secretary of Defense’s award for Excep - tional Civilian Service, the Naval Meritorious Unit Commendation, and the Naval Unit Commendation. He is a member of the National Defense Industry Associa - tion and the United States Naval Institute. ZHU SHEN Zhu Shen is the CEO of BioForesight, a life science strategic consulting company providing licensing, partnering, financing, product launch, and public relations services to clients in the United States and China. She was vice presi- dent of business development at ItherX Pharmaceuticals (formerly Immusol), a private biopharmaceutical company in San Diego developing novel therapeutics in oncology and HCV. Her responsibilities include leading ItherX’s licensing, partnering, and corporate communication. She also held positions at The Wilker- son Group/IBM, Bayer, and Chiron, with increasing responsibilities in marketing, strategic planning, and business development. Dr. Shen is an organizer, speaker, and chair of numerous life science business conferences on licensing, venture investing, and cross-Pacific partnering/CRO trends. She is vice chairwoman and serves on the board of directors of Sino- American Biomedical & Pharmaceutical Professionals Association (SABPA), as well as the BIOCOM Asia Task Force Steering Committee, the Athena San Diego Bioscience Committee and CFO Committee. Dr. Shen has authored numerous articles published in Pharmaceutical Executie, Ernst & Young Global Phar- maceutical Reports, and BioExecutie International. She has been interviewed by the Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, Los Angeles Times, China Economic Reiew, Drug Discoery News, Genetic Engineering News, San Diego Union Tribune, San Diego Business Journal, and ASIA Media. Dr. Shen received the 2006 Annual Asian Heritage Award in Science, Tech- nology, and Research, and the SABPA Achievement Award in 2006 and 2007. She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Colorado and an MBA from the Johnson School at Cornell University. She attended Peking University and Peking Union Medical College in China.

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15 APPENDIX A RICHARD STULEN Richard Stulen is the chief technical officer and vice president of Science and Technology & Research Foundations at Sandia National Laboratories. In his line role, he is responsible for R&D activities of over 1,300 scientists and engineers working in nanoscience and technology, materials science, advanced fusion and pulsed power technology, high-performance computing, radiation sci - ences, microelectronics and microsystems, and engineering sciences. Dr. Stulen is also responsible for Sandia’s technology transfer program, the Science, Tech - nology, and Engineering Strategic Management Unit, and the Nuclear Weapons Program’s Science and Technology programs. Dr. Stulen earned his Ph.D. degree in solid state physics from Purdue Univer- sity and joined Sandia National Laboratories as a member of the Technical Staff in 1976. During his career, he has organized and chaired international workshops and published extensively in areas related to surface science and Extreme Ultra - violet (EUV) lithography. In 1999, he received Lockheed Martin’s prestigious NOVA award for technical excellence. His previous positions include director of the Exploratory Systems and Development Center focusing on homeland security and the CEO and COO of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Virtual National Laboratory. He served on the 2003 DoD Defense Science Board Summer Study on Homeland Security and is currently on the board for the New Mexico Center for Advanced Computing. JAMES TURNER Jim Turner, chief counsel of the Committee on Science and Technology, has 30 years of experience as a congressional staff member working on technology and energy policy. He graduated from Georgetown, Yale, and Westminster Col- lege. He was a Clinton Presidential Transition Team member for the Department of Commerce. Mr. Turner is a trustee of the University of Virginia’s engineering school (UVA/SEAS) and a Dean’s Advisory Council member for Carnegie Mellon’s Heinz School. He serves on the board of directors of Scientists and Engineers for America and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). He chairs UVA/SEAS’s Advisory Board for the Science, Technology, and Society program. With Bill Bonvillian, he does Washington coordination for the joint MIT/UVA Washington Summer Internship program. Mr. Turner has received standards medals from ASME, ANSI, and ASTM, and awards from the Virginia Engineering Foundation, the Federal Patent Lawyer Association, the Technology Transfer Society, the National Institute of Building Sciences, the Federal Laboratory Consortium, the Semiconductor Industry As - sociation, and the U.S. Metric Association.

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158 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS ILONA VASS Ilona Vass graduated in chemical system engineering at the Chemical Uni - versity of Veszprém, Hungary. She received her doctorate in applied mathematics. She started her career at the Research Institute for Technical Chemistry. She was responsible for the mathematical modelling of chemical processes. At the Technical University of Budapest her responsibility was research and lecturing in chemometrics, artificial intelligence, and expert and quality assurance systems. Richter Gedeon Pharmaceutical Works provided an opportunity to work on the realization of Laboratory Information System. In 1992 she became the deputy director general of the Department of Innovation at the Ministry of Industry and Trade. From 1996 she worked as the deputy head of EUREKA Secretariat, Brussels. In 2000 she became the director of the R&D Unit, Ericsson Telecom - municaton Hungary Ltd. In 2004 she was appointed to be the general vice presi - dent of the National Office for Research and Technology, Hungary. RICK L. WEDDLE Rick Weddle is president and CEO of the Research Triangle Foundation of North Carolina, owner and developer of the renowned Research Triangle Park (RTP). Mr. Weddle oversees park operations and development and is setting the strategic direction for RTP’s future. Under his leadership to date, the park’s success has surpassed its historic performance. Since 2004, RTP has gener- ated successful development projects with projected capital investment of over $800 million and the projected creation of over 6,300 new, high-quality jobs. Mr. Weddle’s career encompasses over 25 years of successful leadership and organizational change management. Previously, he led regional economic development organizations in four different states, including the Greater Phoenix Economic Council; the Toledo, Ohio, Regional Growth Partnership; the San Joaquin Partnership & Business Council in Stockton, California; and Winston- Salem Business, Inc., in North Carolina. During his tenure, these organizations created a combined total of 32,000 new jobs and invested over $3.4 billion in their regions. An active speaker and leader in numerous economic development and sci- ence park organizations, Mr. Weddle was elected president of the International Association of Science Parks (IASP) North American Division in December 2007. During his two-year term as N.A. Division President, Mr. Weddle will serve on IASP’s International Board of Directors, and the Research Triangle Park will host the 2009 IASP World Conference on Science and Technology Parks. Active in the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) since its inception, Mr. Weddle, a fellow member, was elected as the first chairman of the board of IEDC in 2002 and received the designation of honorary life member in 2007. Currently, Mr. Weddle serves on the board of directors of the Association of

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15 APPENDIX A University Research Parks (AURP), Research Triangle Regional Partnership; vice chair of Government Affairs, Legislation and Policy for the Regional Transpor- tation Alliance; and co-chair of Reality Check, a joint effort of the Urban Land Institute and Triangle Tomorrow. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy scholar and director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, uni - versities, and research institutes, often briefing government ministers and senior officials from around the world. Dr. Wessner’s work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clusters, regional development, small-firm finance, and public-private part- nerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the develop- ment of new technologies. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2 billion award program for small compa - nies and startups. Under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, he is also directing a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Comparatie Innoation Policy: Best Practice for the 21st Century, and a complementary analysis entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innoation Initiaties. S. PETE WORDEN S. Pete Worden (Brig. Gen., USAF, ret.) is the NASA Ames Research Cen- ter director. Prior to becoming director, Dr. Worden was a research professor of astronomy, optical sciences, and planetary sciences at the University of Arizona where his primary research direction was the development of large space optics for national security and scientific purposes and near-Earth asteroids. Addition - ally he worked on topics related to space exploration and solar-type activity in nearby stars. He is a recognized expert on space issues—both civil and military.

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160 UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS Dr. Worden has authored or co-authored more than 150 scientific technical papers in astrophysics, space sciences, and strategic studies. Moreover, he served as a scientific co-investigator for two NASA space science missions. In addition to his former position with the University of Arizona, Dr. Worden served as a consultant to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on space-related issues. During the 2004 congressional session Dr. Worden worked as a congressional fellow with the Office of Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS), where he served as Senator Brownback’s chief advisor on NASA and space issues. Dr. Worden retired in 2004 after 29 years of active service in the United States Air Force. His final position was director of development and transforma - tion, Space and Missile Systems Center, Air Force Space Command, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California. In this position he was responsible for developing new directions for Air Force Space Command programs and was instrumental in initiating a major Responsive Space Program designed to produce space systems and launchers capable of tailored military effects on timescales of hours. Dr. Worden was commissioned in 1971 after receiving a B.S. degree from the University of Michigan. He entered the Air Force in 1975 after graduating from the University of Arizona with a doctorate in astronomy. Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, Dr. Worden served in every phase of development, international negotiations, and implementation of the Strategic Defense Initiative, a primary component in ending the Cold War. He twice served in the Executive Office of the President. As the staff officer for initiatives in the George Bush administration’s National Space Council, Dr. Worden spearheaded efforts to revitalize U.S. civil space exploration and earth monitoring programs. Dr. Worden commanded the 50th Space Wing that is responsible for more than 60 Department of Defense satellites and more than 6,000 people at 23 world- wide locations. He then served as deputy director for requirements at headquar- ters Air Force Space Command, as well as the deputy director for command and control with the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations at Air Force headquarters. Prior to assuming his current position, Dr. Worden was responsible for policy and direction of five mission areas: force enhancement, space support, space control, force application, and computer network defense. Dr. Worden has written or co-written more than 150 scientific technical papers in astrophysics, space sciences, and strategic studies. He was a scientific co-investigator for two NASA space science missions.