Appendix A
Committee Members

Major General William F. Burns (United States Army, Retired), Chair, was director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency from 1988 to 1989. He served as the first U.S. special envoy to denuclearization negotiations with former Soviet countries under legislation sponsored by former Sen. Sam Nunn (D-GA) and Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.). He is a distinguished fellow at the Army War College. He is also an Arms Control Association board member.


Dr. Burt S. Barnow is associate director for research and principal research scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Barnow received a B.S. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His work focuses on the operation of labor markets and evaluating social programs, and his current research includes an evaluation of the welfare-to-work program, an evaluation of training programs to train U.S. workers for jobs currently filled with foreign workers who come to the United States on an H-1B visa, and an evaluation of New Hampshire’s welfare reforms. Dr. Barnow also teaches program evaluation in the institute’s graduate public policy program and labor economics in the Department of Economics. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, he was vice president of a consulting firm in the Washington, DC area. Dr. Barnow served nine years in the Department of Labor, most recently as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation for the Employment and Training Administration. Dr. Barnow recently co-chaired the NRC Committee on Workforce Needs in Information Technology.


Ms. Joyce Davis is currently senior vice president of WITF, Inc. in Harrisburg, PA. Prior to that, she worked in Prague as the associate director of broadcasting for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. She is the former deputy foreign editor for Knight Ridder Newspapers. Prior to her work at Knight Ridder, Ms. Davis served as foreign editor and director of news staffing at National Public Radio, as well as an on-air reporter, doing special reports on the Middle East and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. In her more than 30 years of journalism, Ms. Davis has been a reporter, columnist and editor in both broadcast and print. She began her journalism career at The New Orleans Times-Picayune. In 1997, Ms. Davis wrote Between Jihad and Salaam: Profiles in Islam, a collection of profiles and interviews with Islamic leaders around the world, which was published in 1997. Her most recent book is Martyrs: Innocence, Vengeance and Despair in the Middle East. Ms. Davis is a former Senior Fellow with the United States Institute of Peace, as well as a member of the Advisory Council of Women in International Security and the Georgetown University Journal of International Affairs.


Dr. Johanna Mendelson Forman is a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where she works on the Americas, civil-military relations, and post-conflict reconstruction. A former codirector of the Post-Conflict Reconstruction Project, she has written extensively on security-sector reform in conflict states, economic development in postwar societies, and the role of the United Nations in peace operations.



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Appendix A Committee Members Major General William F. Burns (United States Army, Retired), Chair, was director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency from 1988 to 1989. He served as the first U.S. special envoy to denuclearization negotiations with former Soviet countries under legislation sponsored by former Sen. Sam Nunn (D-GA) and Sen. Richard Lugar (R- Ind.). He is a distinguished fellow at the Army War College. He is also an Arms Control Association board member. Dr. Burt S. Barnow is associate director for research and principal research scientist at the Institute for Policy Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Barnow received a B.S. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. His work focuses on the operation of labor markets and evaluating social programs, and his current research includes an evaluation of the welfare-to-work program, an evaluation of training programs to train U.S. workers for jobs currently filled with foreign workers who come to the United States on an H-1B visa, and an evaluation of New Hampshire’s welfare reforms. Dr. Barnow also teaches program evaluation in the institute’s graduate public policy program and labor economics in the Department of Economics. Before coming to Johns Hopkins, he was vice president of a consulting firm in the Washington, DC area. Dr. Barnow served nine years in the Department of Labor, most recently as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation for the Employment and Training Administration. Dr. Barnow recently co-chaired the NRC Committee on Workforce Needs in Information Technology. Ms. Joyce Davis is currently senior vice president of WITF, Inc. in Harrisburg, PA. Prior to that, she worked in Prague as the associate director of broadcasting for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. She is the former deputy foreign editor for Knight Ridder Newspapers. Prior to her work at Knight Ridder, Ms. Davis served as foreign editor and director of news staffing at National Public Radio, as well as an on-air reporter, doing special reports on the Middle East and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. In her more than 30 years of journalism, Ms. Davis has been a reporter, columnist and editor in both broadcast and print. She began her journalism career at The New Orleans Times- Picayune. In 1997, Ms. Davis wrote Between Jihad and Salaam: Profiles in Islam, a collection of profiles and interviews with Islamic leaders around the world, which was published in 1997. Her most recent book is Martyrs: Innocence, Vengeance and Despair in the Middle East. Ms. Davis is a former Senior Fellow with the United States Institute of Peace, as well as a member of the Advisory Council of Women in International Security and the Georgetown University Journal of International Affairs. Dr. Johanna Mendelson Forman is a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where she works on the Americas, civil-military relations, and post-conflict reconstruction. A former codirector of the Post-Conflict Reconstruction Project, she has written extensively on security-sector reform in conflict states, economic development in postwar societies, and the role of the United Nations in peace operations. 78

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In 2003, she participated in a review of the post-conflict reconstruction effort of the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq as part of a CSIS team. Dr. Mendelson Forman also brings experience in the world of philanthropy, having served as the director of peace, security, and human rights at the UN Foundation. She has held senior positions in the U.S. government at the U.S. Agency for International Development in the Bureau for Humanitarian Response and the Office of Transition Initiatives, as well as at the World Bank’s Post Conflict Unit. She has been a senior fellow with the Association of the United States Army and a guest scholar at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Most recently, she served as an adviser to the UN Mission in Haiti. She holds adjunct faculty appointments at American University and Georgetown University. Dr. Mendelson Forman is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Advisory Council of Women in International Security and the advisory board of the Latin American Security Network, RESDAL. She holds a J.D. from Washington College of Law at American University, a Ph.D. in Latin American history from Washington University, St. Louis, and a master’s of international affairs, with a certificate of Latin America studies, from Columbia University in New York. Dr. P. Terrence Hopmann is professor of International Relations and director of the Conflict Management Program at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University, Washington, DC, and professor emeritus of Political Science, Brown University, Providence, RI. He specializes in the field of international security, negotiation, and conflict resolution. Dr. Hopmann received his B. A. from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. From 1968 through 1985, he served in the Political Science Department at the University of Minnesota, where he also directed the Quigley Center of International Studies and later the Stassen Center for World Peace in the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. At Brown he established the International Relations Program in 1986, and then became director of the Center for Foreign Policy Development in 1993, which later became the Global Security Program in the Thomas J. Watson Jr. Institute for International Studies, which he directed until 2004. After returning from a sabbatical leave in Washington, DC and Vienna, Austria in academic year 2004-05, he was appointed chair of Brown's Political Science Department. He has held numerous fellowships, including at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the U.S. Institute of Peace, and through the Fulbright Program. He served from 1984-92 as a frequent consultant to the United Nations Development Programme and the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, to the Foreign Ministries of Mexico and Brazil, and to the United Nations University for Peace in Costa Rica, which included the presentation of workshops on international negotiations for diplomats from throughout Latin America. He has also worked with USIP”s Training Program, participating in workshops on negotiation, conflict resolution, and regional security institutions in Budapest, Bangkok, and Bucharest. Dr. Hopmann has also developed and managed an on-line training course for U.S. volunteers with the OSCE maintained by USIP for the Department of State. 79

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Dr. Kathryn Newcomer is a professor at the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at the George Washington University where she is also codirector of the Midge Smith Center for Evaluation Effectiveness, home of The Evaluators’ Institute, and she is the director of the Ph.D. in Public Policy and Administration program, and associate director of the School. She teaches public and nonprofit program evaluation, research design, and applied statistics. She routinely conducts research and training for federal and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations on performance measurement and program evaluation, and she has designed and conducted evaluations for several U.S. federal agencies and dozens of nonprofit organizations. Dr. Newcomer has published five books: Improving Government Performance (1989), The Handbook of Practical Program Evaluation (1994, 2nd edition 2004), Meeting the Challenges of Performance-Oriented Government (2002), Getting Results: A Guide for Federal Leaders and Managers (2005), and Transforming Public and Nonprofit Organizations: Stewardship for Leading Change (2008)―as well as a volume of New Directions for Public Program Evaluation, Using Performance Measurement to Improve Public and Nonprofit Programs (1997), and numerous articles in journals, among them the Public Administration Review. She is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and currently serves on the Comptroller General’s Educators’ Advisory Panel. She served as president of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) for 2006-2007. She has received two Fulbright awards, one for Taiwan (1993) and one for Egypt (2001-04). She has lectured on performance measurement and public program evaluation in Ukraine, Brazil, Egypt, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom. Dr. Newcomer earned a B.S. in education and an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Kansas, and her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa. Dr. Karin von Hippel is codirector of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Post-Conflict Reconstruction Project and senior fellow with the CSIS International Security Program. Previously, she was a senior research fellow at the Centre for Defence Studies, King’s College London, and spent several years working for the United Nations and the European Union in Somalia and Kosovo. In 2004 and 2005, she participated in two major studies for the UN: one on UN peacekeeping and the second on the UN humanitarian system. Also in 2004, she was part of a small team funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development to investigate the development potential of Somali remittances. In 2002, she advised the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on the role of development cooperation in discovering the root causes of terrorism. Since then, she has participated in numerous conferences and working groups on the subject in Africa, Europe, and North America. She also directed a project funded by the MacArthur Foundation on European counterterrorist reforms and edited the volume Europe Confronts Terrorism (Palgrave Macmillan 2005). She was a member of Project Unicorn, a counterterrorism police advisory panel in London. Additional publications include Democracy by Force (Cambridge 2000), which was short-listed for the Westminster Medal in Military History; "Report on Integrated Missions: Practical Perspectives and Recommendations" (UN ECHA Core Group 2005); "Counter Radicalization Development Assistance" (Danish Institute for International Studies 2006); and "Blurring of Mandates in Somalia" in Humanitarian Diplomacy: Practitioners 80

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and Their Craft (UN University Press 2007). She received her Ph.D. in international relations from the London School of Economics, her M.St. from Oxford University, and her B.A. from Yale University. Dr. Christine Wing is senior fellow and project coordinator, Strengthening Multilateral Approaches to Nuclear and Biological Weapons, at the Center on International Cooperation, New York University. Her areas of expertise include: multilateral approaches to nuclear, biological and chemical weapons issues; U.S.-China and East Asian security issues; U.S. foreign and military policy; the role of NGOs in shaping foreign policies; and she has a geographical focus on China and East Asia. From 1995 to 2004, Dr. Wing was program officer for International Peace and Security at the Ford Foundation in New York. In that role she oversaw the foundation’s funding concerned with weapons of mass destruction, the emerging security environment, and intrastate and regional conflict; she worked extensively with organizations in China and West Africa, as well in the United States. She has also served as a consultant to the Nuclear Threat Initiative, and was visiting fellow at Princeton University’s Center of International Studies. From 1984-1989, Dr. Wing was also coordinator of the National Disarmament Program at the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC); and from 1979-1984 she was AFSC’s National Representative for Economic Rights. She holds a Ph.D. in international security studies from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. Dr. I. William Zartman is the Jacob Blaustein Professor of International Organizations and Conflict Resolution and director of the Conflict Management Program at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University. His areas of interest include: conflict resolution and negotiation; crisis management; developing nations; diplomacy; human rights; international relations; political risk analysis; treaty negotiations. Dr. Zartman was the former director of SAIS African Studies Program; former faculty member at the University of South Carolina and New York University; served as Olin Professor at the U.S. Naval Academy, Halevy Professor at the Institute of Political Studies in Paris, and visiting professor at the American University in Paris; was a consultant to the U.S. Department of State; was president of the Tangier American Legation Museum Society; and is past president of the Middle East Studies Association and the American Institute for Maghrib Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in international relations from Yale University. 81