D
Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Planning Committee Members, and Staff

INVITED SPEAKERS

Margaret Anderson joined FasterCures in June 2004 as chief operating officer. She comes to the organization after 5 years at the Academy for Educational Development (AED) in Washington, DC. At AED, she was the deputy director and a team leader in the Center on AIDS & Community Health. Between 1995 and 1998, Ms. Anderson was program director for the Society for Women’s Health Research. Prior to joining the society, she was a health science analyst at the American Public Health Association from 1992 to 1995, where she managed a programmatic portfolio on HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, infectious diseases, women’s health, and public health infrastructure issues. From 1987 to 1991, Ms. Anderson was an analyst and project director at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. She currently serves as a member of the Whitman-Walker Clinic institutional review board and has held numerous committee and coalition memberships for federal agencies and professional associations in the biomedical and public health arena. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and a master’s degree in science, technology, and public policy from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.


Russell “Rusty” Bromley is chief operating officer at the Myelin Repair Foundation. Rusty brings a unique combination of business experience in both academic and commercial research environments. His expertise includes the creation and protection of innovative technologies, business development, and marketing strategies for high tech and life sciences



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D Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Planning Committee Members, and Staff INVITED SPEAKERS Margaret Anderson joined FasterCures in June 2004 as chief operating officer. She comes to the organization after 5 years at the Academy for Educational Development (AED) in Washington, DC. At AED, she was the deputy director and a team leader in the Center on AIDS & Commu- nity Health. Between 1995 and 1998, Ms. Anderson was program direc- tor for the Society for Women’s Health Research. Prior to joining the society, she was a health science analyst at the American Public Health Association from 1992 to 1995, where she managed a programmatic portfolio on HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, infec- tious diseases, women’s health, and public health infrastructure issues. From 1987 to 1991, Ms. Anderson was an analyst and project director at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. She currently serves as a member of the Whitman-Walker Clinic institutional review board and has held numerous committee and coalition memberships for federal agencies and professional associations in the biomedical and pub- lic health arena. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and a master’s degree in science, technology, and public policy from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Russell “Rusty” Bromley is chief operating officer at the Myelin Repair Foundation. Rusty brings a unique combination of business experience in both academic and commercial research environments. His expertise includes the creation and protection of innovative technologies, business development, and marketing strategies for high tech and life sciences 71

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72 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES firms. Formerly he was CEO of Lab Velocity, Inc., and Internet informa- tion portal for the life sciences research community. Prior to that, he was CEO of Berkshire Holding Corporation, a privately-held, multinational manufacturer of contamination control materials for microelectronics and pharmaceutical production. Bromley’s experience also includes 17 years with American Hospital Supply Corporation and Baxter Healthcare, in both the distribution and diagnostics businesses, culminating with 7 years as president of the Burdick and Jackson Division. Bromley holds a de- gree in biochemistry from Rice University. Tricia Brooks is the managing director for alliance development at the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO). Ms. Brooks brings more than 15 years of public affairs, patient advocacy, and FDA regulatory experience to the position, building coalitions and partnerships with pa- tient advocacy organizations; local, national, and international business organizations; state and federal government relations, and pharmaceuti- cal and biotechnology communities. Most recently, Ms. Brooks was a principal at WHD Government Affairs, developing and implementing public affairs strategies, managing issue campaigns, and representing a variety of clients in Washington while developing public- and private- sector relationships. Ms. Brooks was part of the team that successfully integrated Michael J. Fox into national campaigns to raise awareness of the embryonic stem cell research debate. Notably, she was the director of government rela- tions for the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation (CDRF). Prior to CDRF, Ms. Brooks advocated policies related to biomedical research, including clinical trials and stem cell research, led issue-based campaigns through broad public education initiatives, mobilized grassroots lobby- ing, and developed diverse coalitions to advocate with both the legisla- tive and executive branches. Ms. Brooks began her career as a regulatory consultant for pharmaceutical development providing strategic, regula- tory, and technical assistance to the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. She has a B.A. in political science from Fordham University and an M.A. in public policy from George Washington University. Lucie Bruijn, Ph.D., joined the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Association in January 2001 as science director and vice president. Prior to joining the association, Dr. Bruijn led a small team at Bristol Myers Squibb developing in vitro and in vivo model systems for neurodegen- erative disease. Dr. Bruijn received her bachelor’s degree in pharmacy

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73 APPENDIX D from Rhodes University, South Africa. She received a master’s degree in neuroscience and a Ph.D. in biochemistry, specializing in disease mecha- nisms of Alzheimer’s disease, from the University of London, United Kingdom. At the ALS Association, Dr. Bruijn leads the scientific re- search enterprise. She has expanded on the existing grant programs, launching a groundbreaking new research initiative, Translational Re- search to Advance Therapies for ALS (TREAT ALS), with the goal to move treatment options from “bench to bedside.” Cathy Carlson has been communicating science and medicine to non- scientists for over 25 years, largely for nonprofit organizations. She con- ducted undergraduate lab research in psychobiology and began her career as a science writer in environmental studies before moving into neurol- ogy and general medicine. She was a staff science writer and magazine editor for the Muscular Dystrophy Association and a freelance medical writer and journalist before joining the staff of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s headquarters. Ms. Carlson’s unit develops strategies and materials to feed the national website, national magazine, and local chapters. Her unit supports chapters in their research donor development efforts and develops training sessions and materials to a chapter-based volunteer program aimed at building community awareness of the soci- ety’s research activities and progress. Randall Carpenter, M.D., is co-founder, president, and CEO of Seaside Therapeutics, a drug discovery company focused on developing novel therapeutics for disorders of brain development such as Fragile X and autism. Dr. Carpenter has over 25 years of experience in medicine, basic science and clinical research, pharmaceutical drug development, and management. He has held a number of leadership positions in the phar- maceutical and biotechnology industries including president and CEO of Sention, vice president of clinical research and development and regula- tory affairs at Adolor Corporation, director of clinical research at Astra USA, and member of the Global Therapeutic Area Team at Astra Pain Control Sweden. Dr. Carpenter has broad experience leading pharmaceutical research and development teams submitting successful INDs, NDAs, and sNDAs. Prior to industry, he held academic faculty appointments at the Univer- sity of Washington and Wake Forest University. He has coauthored 65 journal articles and several patents and has served as editor-in-chief or on the editorial boards of four medical journals. He has frequently been an

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74 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES invited speaker at national and international meetings and symposia and has been an invited visiting professor to numerous domestic and interna- tional universities and medical schools. Dr. Carpenter is board certified in anesthesiology and pain management and has completed a fellowship in pharmacokinetics at the University of California, San Francisco, and a sabbatical in molecular biology at the University of Washington. Maria Carrillo, Ph.D., is the director of medical and scientific relations for the Alzheimer’s Association national office in Chicago. As such, she has a wide range of responsibilities, including oversight of the associa- tion’s granting process and communication of scientific findings within and outside the organization. Dr. Carrillo received her Ph.D. from Northwestern University’s Institute for Neuroscience in 1996. Since graduating from Northwestern, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Neurology Department at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago, where she was later hired as an assistant professor in the Department of Neurological Sciences. During this time she published a dozen papers and book chapters on aspects of memory and was coin- vestigator on two grants to study memory mechanisms in Parkinson’s disease and anatomical and physiological correlates of cognitive function in Alzheimer’s. As the director of medical and scientific relations, she is responsible for overseeing the Scientific Grant Program, the mechanism through which the association funds research applications. In addition to ensuring the smooth review of applications and distribution of awards to successful applicants, she is responsible for sharing results and ongoing investigations with a wide range of constituents. Dennis W. Choi, M.D., Ph.D., graduated from Harvard College in 1974 and received the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in 1978 (the latter in pharma- cology) from Harvard University and the Harvard–MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. After completing residency and fel- lowship training in neurology at Harvard, he joined the faculty at Stan- ford University and began research into the mechanisms underlying pathological neuronal death. In 1991, he joined Washington University Medical School as head of the Neurology Department; there he also es- tablished the Center for the Study of Nervous System Injury and directed the McDonnell Center for Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. From 2001 until 2006, he was executive vice president for neuroscience at Merck Research Labs. Dr. Choi is currently vice president for academic

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75 APPENDIX D health affairs, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, and executive director, Comprehensive Neurosciences Initiative, at Emory University. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Executive Com- mittee of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, and the College of Phy- sicians of Philadelphia. He has served as president of the Society for Neuroscience, vice-president of the American Neurological Association, and chairman of the U.S./Canada Regional Committee of the Interna- tional Brain Research Organization. He has also served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Board on Life Sciences and councils for the Na- tional Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the Society for Neuroscience, the Winter Conference for Brain Research, the Interna- tional Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, and the Neuro- trauma Society. He has been a member of advisory boards for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, the Grass Foundation, the He- reditary Disease Foundation, the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Foundation, the Harvard–MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, the Queen’s Neuroscience Institute in Honolulu, the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, Germany, the Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS) in Seoul, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as well as for several university-based research consortia, biotechnology companies, and pharmaceutical companies. Timothy Coetzee, Ph.D., is the executive director of Fast Forward, LLC, a venture philanthropy of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society. In this capacity, Dr. Coetzee is responsible for the society’s stra- tegic funding of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies as well as partnerships with the financial and business communities. Prior to as- suming his current position, Dr. Coetzee led the society’s translational research initiatives on nervous system repair and protection in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) as well as the society’s programs to recruit and train phy- sicians and scientists in MS research. Dr. Coetzee received his Ph.D. in molecular biology from Albany Medical College in 1993 and has since been involved in the field of MS research. He was a research fellow in the laboratory of society grantee Dr. Brian Popko at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he received an Advanced Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the society. After completing his training with Dr. Popko, Dr. Coetzee joined the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Con- necticut School of Medicine, where he conducted research that applied

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76 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES new technologies to understand how myelin is formed in the nervous system. He is the author of a number of research publications on the structure and function of myelin. Dr. Coetzee joined the National MS Society’s home office staff in the fall of 2000. Sophia Colamarino, Ph.D., graduated with dual degrees in biological sciences and psychology from Stanford University. Following her under- graduate degrees she received her Ph.D. in neurosciences from the Uni- versity of California, San Francisco (UCSF), working with distinguished neuroscientist Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Ph.D. Her thesis focused on neuro- development, specifically the development of brain connectivity. After receiving her Ph.D., Dr. Colamarino conducted research at the Telethon Institute for Genetics and Medicine in Milan, Italy, led by human geneti- cist Andrea Ballabio, M.D. She then returned to the United States to be- gin her fellowship at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, where she studied adult neural stem cells in the laboratory of stem cell pioneer Fred H. Gage, Ph.D. Sophia has published in such journals as Cell, Nature, and Nature Medicine. After 16 years of laboratory research, she joined the Cure Autism Now Foundation (CAN) in November 2004 as science director. During her tenure at CAN, she oversaw a large growth in the science program and developed several important initiatives including the Neuropathology Workgroup, a collaborative effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of brain enlargement, the first Environ- mental Innovator Award, and research summit meetings on immunology and neuroimaging, among others. Currently, as vice president of research for Autism Speaks, the largest private funder of autism biomedical re- search worldwide, Dr. Colamarino’s many responsibilities include man- agement and oversight of the Autism Speaks’ biology portfolio and the new High Risk/High Impact program. She has also become well known for her ability to communicate science to lay audiences. She grew up in San Francisco and currently resides in Los Angeles. Louis DeGennaro, Ph.D., is currently responsible for the administration of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS’s) research grant pro- grams that support research leading into the prevention, diagnosis, and cure of leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. He also directs LLS’s Ther- apy Acceleration Program, which supports private-sector and academic- based projects with the goal of moving more blood cancer therapies into the development pipeline. Dr. DeGennaro has more than 20 years of re- search and drug development experience in academic and private-sector

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77 APPENDIX D settings. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, San Francisco, and did his postdoctoral research at Yale Uni- versity School of Medicine. His previous academic positions include re- search group leader, Max Planck Institute in Munich, Germany, and associate professor of neurology and cell biology, University of Massa- chusetts Medical School. Dr. DeGennaro’s private-sector positions in- clude senior director of molecular genetics at Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Princeton, New Jersey, and executive vice president for research and de- velopment, SynX Pharma, Inc., in Toronto, Canada. Celia Dominguez, Ph.D., is currently vice president of chemistry at CHDI Management, Inc., a privately held, not-for-profit organization that is pursuing a biotech approach to the discovery and development of drugs that prevent or slow the progression of Huntington Disease. Dr. Dominguez has 17 years of drug discovery and development experience in the pharmaceutical biotechnology sector with Amgen and DuPont Merck, where she held positions of increasing responsibility. At DuPont Merck, she was part of the team that discovered a potent and selective FXa inhibitor, which eventually led to the identification of a clinical can- didate currently in phase 3 clinical trials. Dr. Dominguez received a B.S. in chemistry from Rutgers University, a Ph.D. in synthetic organic chem- istry from Brown University, and postdoctoral training at National Insti- tutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. She is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Neuroscience, and the Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents editorial board for patent selections. Peter Heinecke, J.D., is an independent business and legal adviser to early-stage life science and high-tech companies and currently serves as chief business officer of Experimed Bioscience, Inc., an early-stage therapeutics company. Prior to Experimed, Mr. Heinecke was a founder and vice president of finance and corporate development at Aviir, Inc., a venture-backed molecular diagnostics company. He was a corporate and licensing attorney in private practice for over 10 years at the law firms of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati, PC, and Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Nicholson Graham, LLP. In his practice he represented a wide variety of public and private companies on matters such as venture capital financ- ings, technology licensing, mergers and acquisitions, SEC compliance, and corporate formation and governance. Mr. Heinecke also worked for

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78 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES 2 years as an investment banker with Morgan Stanley & Co. He holds a J.D. and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago and an A.B. in poli- tics from Princeton University. Sharon Hesterlee, Ph.D., is vice president of translational research at the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Dr. Hesterlee received her Ph.D. in neuroscience in 1999 from the University of Arizona, where she studied neural development and received funding from a Flinn Foundation Train- ing Grant. From 2000 to 2006, she served as the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s director of research development. In that position she de- veloped and oversaw an $8 million translational research program aimed at increasing industry participation in drug development for rare disease. She has been involved in the planning of several meetings to identify and remove barriers to therapy development for neuromuscular disease, and she serves on numerous advisory boards including the Department of Health and Human Services federal advisory committee for muscular dystrophy. In 2006, Dr. Hesterlee was appointed vice president of trans- lational research and, in addition to overseeing that program, is currently directing major collaborations in the areas of Duchenne muscular dystro- phy, Friedreich’s ataxia, spinal muscular atrophy, and amyotrophic lat- eral sclerosis (ALS). Katie Hood is chief executive officer of The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF). She has played critical roles in shap- ing MJFF’s strategy of aggressively intervening to close critical gaps that slow potential treatments on their path from the laboratory to Parkinson’s patients, as well as in building a team of in-house research experts needed to implement that strategy. Prior to joining the foundation in Sep- tember 2002, Ms. Hood was employed as a consultant at Bain & Com- pany in New York City, doing work in the consumer products, financial services, and nonprofit sectors. She has also served as an analyst in the credit department of Goldman, Sachs & Co., and as a program coordina- tor with Duke University’s Hart Leadership Program. In August 2008, Ms. Hood was named to the Advisory Council to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), an 18-member board that advises the secretary of health and human services, the director of the National Institutes of Health, and the director of NINDS on research funding prioritization and related matters for neurological diseases, in- cluding Parkinson’s disease. She also is a member of the board of direc- tors of the Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN). She graduated from the

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79 APPENDIX D Harvard Business School and holds a B.A. in public policy studies from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. Judy Illes, Ph.D., is professor of neurology and Canada Research Chair in Neuroethics for the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Illes received her doctorate in hearing and speech sciences from Stanford University in 1987, with a specialization in ex- perimental neuropsychology. She returned to Stanford University in 1991 to help build the research enterprise in imaging sciences in the De- partment of Radiology. She also cofounded the Stanford Brain Research Center (now the Neuroscience Institute at Stanford) and served as its first executive director between 1998 and 2001. Most recently, she was acting associate professor of pediatrics (medical genetics) and director of the program in neuroethics at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics. Dr. Illes has written numerous books, edited volumes, and articles. She is the author of The Strategic Grant Seeker: Conceptualizing Fund- able Research in the Brain and Behavioral Sciences; special guest editor of Topics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, “Emerging Ethical Chal- lenges in MR Imaging”; and Brain and Cognition, “Ethical Challenges in Advanced Neuroimaging.” Her latest book, Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice and Policy, was published by Oxford Univer- sity Press in January 2006. Dr. Illes is cochair of the Committee on Women in Neuroscience of the Society for Neuroscience, a member of the Internal Advisory Board of the Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and a member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives. Richard Insel, M.D., is the executive vice president of research at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), where he has responsi- bility for heading up the strategic direction and oversight of JDRF re- search projects. Prior to joining the JDRF, Dr. Insel was director of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Center for Human Genetics and Molecular Pediatric Disease. He joined JDRF after 26 years at the University of Rochester Medical Center, where he was a member of that institution’s departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology and Immunol- ogy. He has been founding director of the Center for Human Genetics and Molecular Pediatric Disease since 2000. Dr. Insel also serves on the National Advisory Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council of the Na- tional Institutes of Health. In addition to his university research experi- ence, Dr. Insel was scientific cofounder of Praxis Biologics, a

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80 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES biotechnology company established in 1983 and subsequently acquired by Wyeth, the global pharmaceutical and health care products com- pany. He has also served as a visiting associate professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, a fellow in Pediatrics (Research) at Harvard Medical School, a fellow in Medicine (Immunology) at Children’s Hospital Medical Cen- ter in Boston, and in the Laboratory of Parasitic Immunochemistry at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Jonathan Jacoby is the chief operating officer of CollabRx, Inc. He has worked as an organizational entrepreneur, executive, and strategic plan- ning consultant for nonprofit organizations. Mr. Jacoby was cofounder and former CEO of the Hide & Seek Foundation for Lysosomal Disease Research, a nonprofit foundation created by parents, scientists, business leaders, and philanthropists. As the chief staff person of the foundation, he worked to accelerate medical research and scientific innovation. He also founded and served as executive director of the Israel Policy Forum, a bipartisan advocacy group and think tank, and the New Israel Fund, a philanthropic foundation. He also served as a partner at the consulting firm Bronznick Jacoby, LLC, working with not-for-profit organizations to launch new ventures and programs, position organizations for growth, and guide agencies through periods of transition. Mr. Jacoby holds an M.E. from Harvard University, a B.A. from UCLA, and a B.Lit. from the University of Judaism. Cynthia Joyce is the executive director of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Foundation and joined as the first employee of the organization, where she has focused on building momentum in research and drug de- velopment for SMA. Ms. Joyce was previously the director of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Foundation, which supports public education and research in all areas of neurology. Prior to working at the AAN, Ms. Joyce served as a product director for Cephalon, a lead- ing biopharmaceutical company in the Philadelphia biotech corridor, and at Ciba Pharmaceuticals (now Novartis) in New Jersey. She holds a B.S. from the University of Chicago and an M.S. in botany from the Univer- sity of Minnesota. She has served as an adviser to numerous organiza- tions including the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the Epilepsy Foundation, the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association, and many others. She is currently serving on the board of directors of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics.

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81 APPENDIX D Carol Mimura, Ph.D., is the assistant vice chancellor for Intellectual Property & Industry Research Alliances (IPIRA) at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley). IPIRA is the portal for industry ac- cess to Berkeley’s preeminent faculty and research capabilities. Dr. Mi- mura has a B.S. Yale University in molecular biophysics and biochemistry and a Ph.D. in biology (biochemistry and microbiology concentration) from Boston University. She was an NIH-sponsored post- doctoral fellow and research scientist at UC Berkeley in biochemistry and in chemical biodynamics. She served on the board of directors of the Children’s Hospital Research Institute in Oakland, California, and as a board member (the chancellor’s alternate) of BayBio, the regional voice of biotechnology in northern California. She is a former executive direc- tor of UC Berkeley’s Office of Technology Licensing. Prior to her posi- tions at UC Berkeley, Dr. Mimura was an analyst at Technology Forecasters, a consultant to Cor Therapeutics and Genomyx, and a writer for the Genetic Engineering News. Joyce Nelson is president and chief executive officer of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Ms. Nelson started her 21-year career with the society as development manager with the northern California chapter. After 2 years in that position, she was selected to be executive director of the mid-America chapter, serving the greater Kansas City area, western Missouri, and eastern Kansas. In 1991, she joined the society’s national staff and relocated to Denver, Colorado, where she established the posi- tion of national director of campaign development. Three years later she was promoted to vice president of chapter programs. For the past 5 years, she has been vice president of field operations, encompassing all respon- sibilities for the society’s fund-raising and for its relations with chapters. During this time she was instrumental in managing significant organiza- tional initiatives including the Research Challenge of Champions, the Promise: 2010 research campaign, the Corporate Star Program to recog- nize outstanding corporate commitment to the Multiple Sclerosis cause, and the determination of society governance practices. Kenneth Schaner, J.D., formed his own firm to specialize in the repre- sentation of tax-exempt entities at the beginning of 2008, after over 30 years as a partner at Swidler Berlin and Bingham McCutchen. In almost 40 years of private practice, Mr. Schaner has represented many for-profit and nonprofit entities in the corporate and tax aspects of a wide variety of agreements, transactions, financings, licenses, mergers, and acquisi-

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82 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES tions. Since 1983, he has served as general counsel to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF). In that capacity, he represented CFF in its first ven- ture philanthropy transaction, with Aurora Biosciences Corporation. Since then, he has represented CFF, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Stanley Medical Research Institute, the National Neuro- vision Research Institute, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, and others in numerous venture philanthropy transactions and related legal matters. Mr. Schaner began his career at the Internal Revenue Service’s legis- lative and regulations division. During his time with the IRS, he worked on the 1969 Tax Reform Act and was one of the principal drafters of the then-new private foundation provisions. In 1982, he and several others founded Swidler Berlin. As a partner in that firm, he served at various times as its managing member and chairman of its corporate group. After Swidler Berlin’s merger with Bingham McCutchen in 2006, Mr. Schaner became a partner at Bingham until he formed his new firm in 2008 to focus his representation on tax-exempt organizations while applying a rate structure that would be uneconomic for the larger firms. Jonathan Simons, M.D., is chief executive officer and president of the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF). Dr. Simons was distinguished profes- sor of hematology and oncology at the Emory University School of Medicine and professor of biomedical engineering and materials sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the founding director of the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University in Atlanta and codirector of the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Ex- cellence at Emory and Georgia Tech. Dr. Simons has been affiliated with the PCF since 1995 when, as a young assistant professor, he received his first research award from the PCF Competitive Awards Program for his research in genetic therapy for advanced prostate cancer. He received a competitive award again in 1996, 1997, and 1998 and was coleader of the Johns Hopkins site in the PCF Therapy Consortium. He has served as a reviewer for both the 2005 Competitive Awards Program and the 2006 Donald S. Coffey Career Development Program. Dr. Simons himself was also a recipient of the PCF Donald S. Coffey Award for Physician- Scientists. Jennifer Taylor, Ph.D., is the head of external alliances and associate director of program management at the Genomics Institute of the Novar- tis Research Foundation (GNF) in San Diego, California. GNF’s mission

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83 APPENDIX D is to apply state-of-the-art technologies in chemistry, biology, automa- tion, and information sciences to explore complex biomedical problems in cancer biology, immunology, neuroscience, and metabolic as well as infectious diseases. These discoveries are being translated into human therapeutics through an internal preclinical drug discovery effort coupled with further development activities in collaboration with Novartis Phar- maceuticals. In addition to collaborations within Novartis, GNF also fos- ters active partnerships with researchers at academic institutions, nonprofit foundations, and federal granting agencies. In her role at GNF, Dr. Taylor is responsible for managing preclinical drug discovery pro- grams with Novartis Pharmaceuticals, nonprofit foundations, and gov- ernment agencies. Before joining GNF in 2004, she was a senior research scientist at Vertex Pharmaceuticals in San Diego. She received her B.A. in biology from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in cellular and molecu- lar biology from the University of Pennsylvania. Sharon Terry is president and CEO of the Genetic Alliance, a network transforming health by promoting an environment of openness centered on the health of individuals, families, and communities. She is the found- ing executive director of PXE International, a research advocacy organi- zation for the genetic condition pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). Following the diagnosis of their two children with PXE in 1994, Ms. Terry, a former college chaplain, and her husband, founded and built a dynamic organization that fosters ethical research and policies and pro- vides support and information to members and the public. Ms. Terry is at the forefront of consumer participation in genetics research, services, and policy and serves as a member of many of the major governmental advi- sory committees on medical research, including liaison to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders and Genetic Diseases in Newborns and Children and the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Ms. Terry is a cofounder of the Genetic Alliance BioBank, a central- ized biological and data (consent/clinical/environmental) repository cata- lyzing translational genomic research on rare genetic diseases. The BioBank works in partnership with academic and industrial collaborators to develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics to better understand and treat these diseases. Along with the other coinventors of the gene associ- ated with PXE (ABCC6), Ms. Terry holds the patent for the invention.

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84 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES She codirects a 33-lab research consortium and manages 52 offices worldwide for PXE International. Andrea Tobias, Ph.D., is currently the portfolio adviser to Fast For- ward, LLC, the philanthropic venture arm of the U.S. National Multiple Sclerosis Society. She is also a part-time venture partner with Brandon Capital Partners, a life sciences fund in Sydney, Australia. She previ- ously was a partner at CMEA Ventures (San Francisco) from 2001 to 2006. Prior to this, Dr. Tobias spent 4 years in venture capital as an assis- tant director for Apax Partners & Cie Ventures (Paris) and with Abing- worth Management (London). She also held management positions for 10 years in the U.S. biotech industry. She was director of strategic devel- opment for Chiron Corporation and manager of new research identifica- tion for Genentech. In addition, she served as the research and development liaison for foreign subsidiaries in Canada, Japan, and Swit- zerland. Dr. Tobias has a degree in physiology/anatomy from the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in endocrinology from the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. Linda Van Eldik, Ph.D., is codirector of the Center for Drug Discovery and Chemical Biology at Northwestern University, associate director of the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, and professor of cell and molecular biology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Dr. Van Eldik has published peer- reviewed articles in neuroscience, glia cell biology, signal transduction, virology, and drug discovery. Dr. Van Eldik received her Ph.D. in microbiology/immunology from Duke University in 1977, followed by postdoctoral training at the Rockefeller University from 1978 to 1981, where she was awarded a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship and National Research Service Award in cell biology from the National Institutes of Health. She later held the positions of assistant professor, associate professor, and professor of pharmacology and cell biology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and was an associ- ate investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute before moving to Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chi- cago in 1994. Susan Wolf, J.D., joined the University of Minnesota faculty in 1993 and is the McKnight Presidential Professor of Law, Medicine, & Public Policy and the Faegre & Benson Professor of Law. She is the founding

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85 APPENDIX D director of the Joint Degree Program in Law, Health, & the Life Sciences and the founding chair of the Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment, & the Life Sciences. She is also a professor of medicine in the University’s medical school and a faculty member in the University’s Center for Bioethics. Professor Wolf received an A.B. degree, summa cum laude, from Princeton University and a J.D. degree from Yale Law School. She clerked for Judge Leonard B. Sand of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and then practiced with the New York law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison from 1981 to 1984. In 1984–1985, Professor Wolf was a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the Hastings Center in New York, a senior bio- ethics research institute. She then became the center’s associate for law. She also taught law and medicine at New York University School of Law as an adjunct associate professor from 1987 to 1992. In 1992–1993, Pro- fessor Wolf was a fellow at Harvard University in the Program in Ethics and the Professions. She currently serves as a member of the Law & Neuroscience Project funded by the MacArthur Foundation and as a sen- ior consultant to the Hastings Center on its project on guidelines for end- of-life care, funded by the Donaghue Foundation and Sussman Trust. Dan Zenka is vice president of communications at the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF). Mr. Zenka brings more than 25 years of international public relations, brand development, and communications strategy ex- perience to his role at PCF. Prior to joining PCF, he was director of pub- lic relations and brand management at FEI, an Oregon-based technology company that develops high-end equipment for enabling nanoscale ex- ploration, discovery, and development in the areas of life science, elec- tronics, and general industry. While at FEI he also headed the communications and brand task force for the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI), a unique, publicly funded consor- tium of leading academic research institutions, corporations, and the Pa- cific Northwest National Laboratory, chartered to accelerate nanotechnology development in the Northwest. Mr. Zenka has also held management positions at Bioject Medical Systems and Lattice Semicon- ductor Corporation and consulted to Philips Medical Systems in the Netherlands. He is a graduate of the University of Southern California with degrees in journalism/public relations and speech communications. He is also an accredited member of the Public Relations Society of America. His articles on technology and communications have been pub- lished by PR Tactics, Nanotech Briefs, and Nanotechnology Now.

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86 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS Timothy Coetzee, Ph.D. (Co-chair), biography in Invited Speakers section. William H. Thies, Ph.D. (Co-chair), is vice president for medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer’s Association, where he oversees the world’s largest private, nonprofit Alzheimer’s disease research grants program. Under his direction, the organization’s annual grant budget has doubled, and the program has designated special focus areas targeting the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease, caregiving and care systems, and research involving diverse populations. He played a key role in launching Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association and in establishing the Research Round- table, a consortium of senior scientists from industry, academia, and government who convene regularly to explore common barriers to drug discovery. In previous work at the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1988 to 1998, Dr. Thies formed a new stroke division that recently became the American Stroke Association. He also built the Emergency Cardiac Care Program, a continuing medical education program that trains over 3 million professionals annually. He has worked with the Na- tional Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to form the Brain Attack Coalition. Prior to joining the AHA, he held faculty positions at Indiana University in Bloomington and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Thies earned a B.A. in biology from Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, Illinois, and a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Huda Akil, Ph.D., is the Gardner Quarton Distinguished University Pro- fessor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry at the University of Michigan and the codirector of the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute. Dr. Akil has made seminal contributions to the understanding of the neu- robiology of emotions, including pain, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. Early on, she focused on the role of the endorphins and their re- ceptors in pain and stress responsiveness. Dr. Akil’s scientific contribu- tions have been recognized with numerous honors and awards. These include the Pacesetter Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in 1993 and, with Dr. Stanley Watson, the Pasarow Award for Neurosci- ence Research in 1994.

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87 APPENDIX D In 1998, Dr. Akil received the Sachar Award from Columbia Univer- sity and the Bristol Myers Squibb Unrestricted Research Funds Award. Dr. Akil is past president of the American College of Neuropsychophar- macology (1998) and past president of the Society for Neuroscience (2004), the largest neuroscience organization in the world with over 35,000 members. She was elected as a fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science in 2000. In 1994, she was elected to the membership of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences and is currently a member of its council. More re- cently (2004), she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Daniel J. Burch, M.D., is executive vice president of research and de- velopment and chief medical officer of CeNeRx Biopharma. Dr. Burch holds an M.D. from Vanderbilt University and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He completed a residency in internal medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and a fellowship in infectious diseases at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Burch has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for a total of 15 years at Abbott Laboratories, SmithKlineBeecham, and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). His most recent post at GSK was senior vice president, Neurosciences Medicines Development Centre. He was ap- pointed to his current position in 2007. Dennis W. Choi, M.D., Ph.D., biography in Invited Speakers section. Judy Illes, Ph.D., biography in Invited Speakers section. Walter Koroshetz, M.D., is the deputy director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health. He is an internationally renowned neurologist and outstanding investiga- tor and administrator. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Koroshetz was vice chair of the neurology service and director of stroke and neurointensive care services at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He was also a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and has led neurology resident training at MGH since 1990. Dr. Koroshetz graduated from Georgetown University and received his medical degree from the University of Chicago. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and MGH. He trained in neurol- ogy at MGH, after which he did postdoctoral studies in cellular neuro-

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88 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES physiology at MGH and the Neurobiology Department at Harvard. He joined the neurology staff, first in the Huntington’s Disease unit and then in the stroke and neurointensive care service. During his career Dr. Koroshetz has conducted basic electrophysiology research in cell membranes and in cultures of nerve cells and glial cells (which support nerve cells). His clinical research has focused on finding new treatments for patients with Huntington’s Disease and stroke. Story C. Landis, Ph.D., has been director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) since September 1, 2003. As the director of the NINDS, Dr. Landis oversees an annual budget of $1.5 billion and a staff of more than 900 scientists, physician-scientists, and administrators. The institute supports research by investigators in public and private institutions across the country, as well as by scientists working in its intramural laboratories and branches in Bethesda, Mary- land. Since 1950, the institute has been at the forefront of U.S. efforts in brain research. Dr. Landis joined the NINDS in 1995 as scientific director and worked with former institute director Zach W. Hall, Ph.D., to coordinate and reengineer the institute’s intramural research programs. Between 1999 and 2000, under the leadership of NINDS director Gerald D. Fischbach, M.D., she led the movement, together with the National Insti- tute of Mental Health scientific director Robert Desimone, Ph.D., to bring some sense of unity and common purpose to 200 laboratories from 11 different NIH institutes, all of which conduct leading-edge clinical and basic neuroscience research. A native of New England, Dr. Landis received her undergraduate degree in biology from Wellesley College in 1967 and her master’s de- gree (1970) and Ph.D. (1973) from Harvard University, where she con- ducted research on cerebellar development in mice. After postdoctoral work at Harvard University studying transmitter plasticity in sympathetic neurons, she served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School De- partment of Neurobiology. In 1985, she joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio, where she held many academic positions including associate professor of pharmacology; professor and director of the Center on Neurosciences; and chairman of the Department of Neurosciences, a department she was instrumental in establishing. Under her leadership, Case Western’s neuroscience department achieved worldwide acclaim and a reputation for excellence.

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89 APPENDIX D Throughout her research career, Dr. Landis has made many funda- mental contributions to the understanding of developmental interactions required for synapse formation. She has garnered many honors and awards and is an elected fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ameri- can Neurological Association. In 2002, she was named the president- elect of the Society for Neuroscience. Richard Nakamura, Ph.D., is the deputy director of the National Insti- tute of Mental Health (NIMH). He has served in the position of deputy director of NIMH since 1997 and NIMH acting director from 2001 to 2002. He has played a key role in revitalizing both NIMH’s extramural and intramural research programs. In addition, he has been at the forefront of efforts to speed the translation of scientific knowledge into clinical practice and to transmit these advances to Congress and the public. Arriving at NIMH in 1976 as a postdoctoral fellow in the intramural Laboratory of Neuropsychology, Dr. Nakamura conducted behavioral and physiological studies in non-human primates to understand cognitive processing in the brain. He moved to NIMH headquarters in 1986, serv- ing as chief of the Behavioral and Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch in the early 1990s and later as associate director of science policy and program planning. Rae Silver, Ph.D., is Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Professor of Natu- ral and Physical Sciences and holds joint appointments at Barnard Col- lege and Columbia University. Dr. Silver is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association of Arts and Sci- ences. She has participated extensively in scientific and educational ac- tivities including serving as chair for NASA’s Research Maximization and Prioritization Committee reviewing scientific priorities for the Inter- national Space Station, as well as chair, External Advisory Committee, National Science Foundation Center for the Study of Biological Rhythms at the University of Virginia. Dr. Silver has been a search committee member for editors of journals, a Society for Neuroscience program committee member (Theme E—Autonomic and Limbic System), department chairs and provost at various institutions, and panel member of a number of committees, including NASA: International Space Station Cost and Management Evaluation Task Force, member Georgia State, Emory and other colleges, National Science Foundation Center for Be-

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90 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES havioral Neuroscience External Advisory Board Society for Neurosci- ence Education Committee, and Ford Foundation Minority Fellowship review panel. She was also president of Society Research in Biological Rhythms. As senior adviser at the National Science Foundation (NSF), she worked with NSF staffers in all the scientific directorates to create a series of workshops to examine opportunities for the next decade in mak- ing advances in neuroscience through the joint efforts of biologists, chemists, educators, mathematicians, physicists, psychologists, and stat- isticians. Dr. Silver’s studies of the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain were the first to conclusively demonstrate that this brain tissue can be readily transplanted and restore function at a very high success rate in an animal model. The laboratory is renowned for analysis of the input, output, and intraneuronal circuits underlying the function of the brain’s master clock. A second line of research entails the study of mast cells (renowned for their role in producing allergic reac- tions) in modulating brain function and as a major source of brain hista- mine. The research has been supported without interruption by NIH and NSF, among other sources. Dr. Silver is deeply committed to educating undergraduate and graduate students, both at the national and institutional level and in the hands-on context of the laboratory. Consistent with this interest, she cre- ated the undergraduate program in quantitative reasoning at Barnard Col- lege and published, with colleagues, studies of mathematical learning. She initiated the undergraduate major in neuroscience, serving as its first program director. She also served as director of the graduate program in psychology at Columbia University. Christian G. Zimmerman, M.D., FACS, M.B.A., is chairman and founder of the Idaho Neurological Institute (INI), adjunct professor of psychology at Boise State University, and past chief executive officer of Neuroscience Associates. He has also served as a board member for the Idaho State Board of Health and Welfare. Dr. Zimmerman established the INI research facility to focus on nervous system injury, repair, and neuroplasticity. He leads its various interdisciplinary research teams and is coprofessor for biology and cognitive neuroscience research at the fa- cility. Research projects include a 20-year longitudinal study of traumatic brain injury and investigations of spinal injury, stroke, aneurysms, arte- rial thrombolytic therapy intervention, neuropathology, central nervous system tumors, sleep disorders, deep brain stimulation, movement disor-

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91 APPENDIX D ders, and five TATRC telemedicine grants. In his role as INI chairman, he has facilitated numerous symposia and workshops to provide educa- tional opportunities for medical professionals and for the general public. Additionally, he chairs prevention programs for Idaho’s youth such as Think First. Dr. Zimmerman is a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery and Pain Management and a fellow of the Ameri- can College of Surgeons and Physician Executives. He received his mas- ter’s of business administration from Auburn University. STUDY STAFF Bruce M. Altevogt, Ph.D., is a senior program officer on the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. His primary interests focus on policy issues related to basic research and preparedness for catastrophic events. He received his doctorate from Harvard University’s program in neuro- science. Following more than 10 years of research, Dr. Altevogt joined the National Academies as a science and technology policy fellow with the Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellow- ship Program. Since joining the Board on Health Sciences Policy, he has been a program officer on multiple IOM studies, including Sleep Disor- ders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem, the Na- tional Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: 2007 Amendments, and Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems. He is currently serving as director of the Forum on Medical and Public Health Prepared- ness for Catastrophic Events and the Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Forum and as a costudy director on the National Academy of Sciences Human Embryonic Stem Cells Research Advisory Committee. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where he majored in biology and minored in South Asian studies. Andrew M. Pope, Ph.D., is the director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. With a Ph.D. in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests are in science policy, biomedical ethics, and the envi- ronmental and occupational influences on human health. During his ten- ure at the National Academies and since 1989 at the IOM, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, dis- ability prevention, and biologic markers to the protection of human sub- jects of research, NIH priority-setting processes, organ procurement and

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92 VENTURE PHILANTHROPY STRATEGIES transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in counter- ing terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the National Academy of Sci- ences President’s Special Achievement Award and the IOM’s Cecil Award. Sarah L. Hanson is associate program officer for the Forum on Neuro- science and Nervous System Disorders on the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. Ms. Hanson previously worked for the Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research. Prior to joining the In- stitute of Medicine, she served as research and program assistant at the National Research Center for Women & Families. Ms. Hanson has a B.A. from the University of Kansas with a double major in political sci- ence and international studies and a minor in women’s studies. She re- cently completed a post-baccalaureate premed program at the University of Maryland and hopes to attend medical school in the future. Lora K. Taylor is a senior project assistant for the Board on Health Sci- ences Policy at the IOM. She has 15 years of experience working in the National Academies. Prior to joining the IOM, she served as the adminis- trative associate for the Report Review Committee and the Division on Life Sciences’ Ocean Studies Board. Ms. Taylor has a B.A. from Georgetown University with a double major in psychology and fine arts.