Appendix F
Sample Learning Outcomes

METALLIC MATERIALS

The following could serve as a model set of outcomes for the successful student. This set is illustrative only and is presented by the committee as an example of what it envisages could be taught about corrosion to a range of engineering students and graduates. The committee does not purport that these lists of outcomes are complete. Establishing a complete and comprehensive set of outcomes would require an effort beyond the scope of this study.

Undergraduate Engineering Students in Design Disciplines (Mechanical, Civil, Chemical, Industrial, Aeronautical)
  • Be aware of general properties of classes of materials.

  • Understand that properties can be affected by processing.

  • Know that resources exist for aiding materials selection.

  • Understand that trade-offs in properties are often required—between, for example, strength and ductility.

  • Know that material properties degrade with time in an aggressive environment.

  • Know that the degradation of properties must be considered in design processes.

  • Know that there are different approaches to designing against corrosion.



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Appendix F Sample Learning Outcomes METALLIC MATERIALS The following could serve as a model set of outcomes for the successful student. This set is illustrative only and is presented by the committee as an example of what it envisages could be taught about corrosion to a range of engineering students and graduates. The committee does not purport that these lists of outcomes are com- plete. Establishing a complete and comprehensive set of outcomes would require an effort beyond the scope of this study. undergraduate Engineering Students in Design Disciplines (Mechanical, Civil, Chemical, Industrial, Aeronautical) • Be aware of general properties of classes of materials. • Understand that properties can be affected by processing. • know that resources exist for aiding materials selection. • Understand that trade-offs in properties are often required—between, for example, strength and ductility. • know that material properties degrade with time in an aggressive environment. • know that the degradation of properties must be considered in design processes. • know that there are different approaches to designing against corrosion. 11

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 12 of • know to interact with experts in materials selection and corrosion when necessary. Engineering Students in Materials Science and Engineering Who upon graduation Should Be knowledgeable in Materials Selection • Understand how properties depend on microstructure. • Understand how microstructure can be manipulated through processing to get the desired properties. • know how to select the right material for a given application based on the optimum combination of properties, including cost, availability, and manufacturability. • Be familiar with the forms of corrosion. • know how to select the best material for corrosion resistance. • Be aware of corrosion prevention and mitigation approaches. • know that experimental methods exist to assess and predict the rate of corrosion. • know to interact with experts in corrosion when necessary. graduate Engineering Students Specializing in Corrosion Who upon graduation Will Be Experts in the Field of Corrosion • Be able to apply thermodynamics through the Nernst equation and Pour- baix diagram to predict likely equilibrium phases present. • Be able to explain the electrochemical nature of metallic corrosion. —Write anodic reactions —Write cathodic reactions • Be able to use experimental methods for determining corrosion current and potential, weight loss, polarization methods. • Predict the effect of changes in solution concentration, temperature, and velocity on corrosion behavior. • For metallic corrosion be able to describe, explain, and apply to different situations the various forms of corrosion. —Uniform —Localized —Environmental cracking • For polymers be able to describe, explain, and apply to different situations the various forms of degradation. —Swelling —Solvation —Environmental cracking

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aPPendix f 1 • Given a new set of conditions, predict the corrosion reactions and the likely type(s) of corrosion. • Be able to apply, explain, and describe various protection schemes. —Design and materials selection —Environmental changes —Coatings —Cathodic and anodic protection —Inhibitors • Be able to describe applications of appropriate instrumentation for measur- ing changes in materials. NONMETALLIC AND POLYMERIC MATERIALS A similar list of outcomes can be developed for nonmetallic and polymeric materials. Prerequisites should be chemistry, physics, mathematics, materials, mechanics, thermodynamics, and design. • Be able to predict or identify physical processes and chemical reactions that will cause environmental degradation of materials and the changes these will cause in the materials. • Be able to explain the chemical and physical effect on materials of —UV radiation, oxygen, temperature, humidity, and aqueous immersion —Flexing, stretching, and other physical stresses • Be able to use experimental methods for determining changes due to envi- ronmental exposure in material properties such as the following: Tg, MW, elastic modulus, gloss, color, spectral properties (IR, UV, etc.), conductivity, dielectric constant. • Predict the effect of changes in use environment on materials performance. • Be able to describe, explain, and apply to different situations the various forms of materials changes: —Uniform degradation —Localized degradation —Propagation of degradation effects • For polymers and composites be able to describe, explain, and apply to different situations the various forms of degradation. —Swelling —Solvation —Environmental cracking • Given a new set of environmental conditions, predict the chemical reac- tions that could degrade the materials involved and the likely ways their performance could be degraded.

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 1 of • Be able to apply, explain, and describe various ways of protecting materials from their environment: —Be able to examine newly developed materials for sensitivity to damage from their use environment. —Be able to predict the effect of environmental changes. —Be able to choose coatings and surface films for protection. —Be able to use additives such as UV absorbers and free-radical traps. • Be able to describe the application of appropriate instrumentation for measuring changes in materials.