Appendix G
Committee Biographies

Wesley L. Harris, Chair, is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on theoretical and experimental unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics; computational fluid dynamics; and the government policy impact on procurement of high-technology systems. Earlier, he served as the associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA. He has also served as the vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris has served on committees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Helicopter Society (AHS), and the National Technical Association (NTA) and as advisor to eight colleges, universities, and institutes. Dr. Harris earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He was elected fellow of the AIAA and of the AHS for personal engineering achievements, engineering education, management, and advancing cultural diversity. Dr. Harris is an outsider to corrosion engineering and as such will act as an honest broker in the committee process as well as bring wide experience in engineering and education. Dr. Harris has served as chair and member of various boards and committees of the National Research Council (NRC), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Army Science Board, and several state governments. He is a current member of the NRC Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences committee, the NAE panel on grand challenges in engineering, and the NAE Committee on Engineering Education.



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Appendix G Committee Biographies Wesley L. Harris, Chair, is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on theoretical and experimental unsteady aero- dynamics and aeroacoustics; computational fluid dynamics; and the government policy impact on procurement of high-technology systems. Earlier, he served as the associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA. He has also served as the vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris has served on committees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Helicopter Society (AHS), and the National Technical Association (NTA) and as advisor to eight colleges, universities, and institutes. Dr. Harris earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He was elected fellow of the AIAA and of the AHS for personal engineering achievements, engineering education, management, and advancing cultural diversity. Dr. Harris is an outsider to corrosion engineer- ing and as such will act as an honest broker in the committee process as well as bring wide experience in engineering and education. Dr. Harris has served as chair and member of various boards and committees of the National Research Council (NRC), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Army Science Board, and several state governments. He is a current member of the NRC Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences committee, the NAE panel on grand challenges in engineering, and the NAE Committee on Engineering Education. 1

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 1 of Ralph Adler is a research metallurgist on the coatings and corrosion team in the Materials Applications Branch of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). He works in the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate of ARL, which is located at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and has been a federal employee working for the Army since 1985, when he joined the Army Materials Technology Labo- ratory. Dr. Adler is a research scientist and is not involved in the formulation or implementation of DOD policy. His research interests include science education and awareness for all levels of our society. He has taught graduate-level courses in x-ray diffraction at Northeastern University. To encourage technical collaboration between ARL and universities, he has worked with university faculty in an advisory capacity to provide project oversight and to share resources and materials as well as collaboratively by coauthoring joint publications. He has served as a science fair judge at both local and national levels and organized the initial student poster session at the 2005 Tri-Service Corrosion Conference. To improve science awareness of public school students and the quality of science education in his hometown, he has been a member of the Committee on Science Education of the Citizens for Wellesley Public Education; its charter was to enhance and enrich science education of public school students through strong support of the Wellesley public schools science faculty and by obtaining donations of scientific equipment. Dr. Adler has represented the Army on several high-level DOD panels: currently as an ARL member of the Corrosion Forum, where he is chair of the Corrosion Education Consortium; earlier as chair of Subpanel 8 (materials processing/manufacturing research) for Project RELIANCE-Technical Panel of Advanced Materials; as a member of the Laboratory Infrastructures Consolidation Study in the office of the Secretary of Defense, the JDL-TPAM Manufacturing Sciences Working Group; two sessions of the Technical Managers Acquisition Workshop; and as secretary for the Metals Panel TP-1 of the Materials Technology and Performance of the MAT group of TTCP. He is or has been a member of a number of professional commit- tees: as service liaison on NRC panels NMAB-444 and -467; as a member of the ASM/Advisory Technical Awareness Council; on thesis review panels for WPI and Northwestern University; and played leadership roles as chair and executive com- mittee member of the Boston section of The Metallurgical Society (TMS)/AIME. He has also participated in many Army/DOD/NSF Source Selection panels and has been an invited member of the ARL/ARO and IRAD technical review boards. Dr. Adler earned a D.Eng. in metallurgy from yale University and has over 40 years of experience in leading and conducting sponsored or in-house research on a variety of materials science and engineering programs in both industrial and Army organizations. With his expertise in synthesis, metals processing, and materials characterization, he has authored publications and holds U.S. patents in a variety of technical areas with commercial and military applications.

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aPPendix g 17 gordon P. Bierwagen is a professor of coatings and polymeric materials (CPM) at North Dakota State University (NDSU). He has a B.S. in chemistry and mathematics from Valparaiso University and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Iowa State Uni- versity. He has been involved in R&D in coatings since his first nonacademic work at Battelle Memorial Institute in 1969. He worked in the Battelle Electrochemical Engineering Department on a project for PPG on the electrochemical characteriza- tion of anionic electrodeposition coatings and the modeling of solution changes during electrodeposition. After leaving Battelle in 1970, Dr. Bierwagen joined the Paint Research Department at the Sherwin-Williams Research Center in Chicago. In 1971, he joined the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT), becoming an active member of the Chicago Society. At NDSU he is still active in the FSCT, serving on its Roon Award Committee, interacting with the Coatings Industry Education Fund on research awards and undergraduate scholarships for CPM at NDSU, and attending paint shows with regularity. He has also served on the American Chemical Society (ACS) Polymeric Materials Science and Engineer- ing (PMSE) Division’s Tess Award Committee and its Program Committee and organized and published the ACS-PMSE Symposium “Corrosion and Its Control by Coatings” from the 1996 ACS national meeting in New Orleans. Since joining the NDSU CPM Department, Dr. Bierwagen has continued his research inter- ests in the physical chemistry of coatings, foaming in W/R polymer solutions, adsorption from solution onto pigment particles, CPVC-related phenomena, and computer-based coatings design. He also set up a new research program at NDSU on corrosion control by coatings that has been very successful in attracting govern- ment and industry support. He is also working on new theoretical analyses and interpretation of CPVC-related behavior in coatings and films, corrosion protec- tion of outdoor artistic and historical bronze sculpture, lithium-polymer battery studies (polymer/composite electrode design), opacity and film imperfections, and durability/lifetime prediction for coatings. Since joining NDSU, Dr. Bierwagen has had 105 publications and has made numerous presentations for the FSCT, NACE, the Electrochemical Society, ACS-PMSE, the Society for Protective Coatings, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Institute of Conserva- tion. He has made two invited presentations at the Gordon Research Conference on Coatings and was a session chair on aqueous corrosion. He was the plenary lecturer at the FATIPEC 2000 Congress in Turin, Italy, and an invited keynote speaker at EIS 2001. In 2007 he was honored with the Matiello Award of the FSCT and gave the Matiello lecture in October 2007 at the annual meeting in Toronto. Dianne Chong is the director of materials and process technology for the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company. She is responsible for new technology develop- ment and transitioning onto Boeing products, functional excellence, and pro- gram support throughout the life cycle of the airplanes. Earlier, Dr. Chong was

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 1 of the head of strategic operations and business for engineering, in which capacity she is responsible for defining and implementing a solid strategy for all Boeing Engineering and for leading both the enterprise and Integrated Defense Systems engineering process councils, which cover 45,000 engineers. Before that, she was the director of materials and process technology for the Phantom Works and was responsible for development and technology transfer. In this capacity, Dr. Chong supports all Boeing business units. She was also responsible for the functional management of engineers who were matrixed to program support, production, and research areas. She was manager of materials and processes, liaison, and pro- cess control engineers who supported the fabrication centers and the production aircraft programs (F/A-18C/D, F-15, AV-8B, T45TS, and C-17). She was team leader of material and product form engineering in production aircraft programs since June 1995. Dr. Chong received a B.S. in biology and psychology (1971), an M.S. in physiology (1975), and an M.S. in metallurgical engineering (1983) from the University of Illinois. She utilized the knowledge from these two disciplines to develop porous titanium prostheses. In 1986, she completed her doctoral work by developing a steelmaking technology derived from methods used by the ancient Chinese and received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. She completed the degree Executive Master of Manufacturing Management at Washington University in 1998. Dr. Chong is a fellow of ASM International and a member of TMS, AIAA, SAE, SME, SWE, Beta Gamma Sigma, and Tau Beta Pi. She was a 2001 graduate of Leadership America, a 1999 participant in the Greater Missouri Leadership Challenge, and 1997 recipient of the yWCA Special Leadership Award in Science and Technology. She has received the Boeing Corporate Diversity Award (2003), the Women of Color Technology All-Star (2002), the OCA Corporate Achievement Award (2002), the Diversity Change Agent Award (2004), and the University of Illinois Alumna of the year (2006). She is a member of the NRC National Materials Advisory Board. george E. Dieter is the emeritus professor of mechanical engineering and the Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering at the University of Maryland, having retired as dean of the College of Engineering in 1994. Before that, Dr. Dieter was professor of engineering and director of the Processing Research Institute at Carnegie Mellon, as well as chair of metallurgical engineering at Drexel University. He started his career at the Engineering Research Laboratory of the DuPont Com- pany. His teaching and research interests are engineering design, materials process- ing, and quality engineering. Dr. Dieter is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of AAAS, ASM International, TMS, and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). He was national president of ASEE and received the Lamme Medal, its highest honor. His book Mechanical Metallurgy has been in print since 1961 in various editions, and his book Engineering Design: A

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aPPendix g 1 Materials and Processing Approach is in its third edition (2000). He was the editor of volume 20 of the ASM Handbook, Materials Selection and Design, published in 1997. He has been active on many NRC committees, including the National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Dieter received a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering from the Drexel Institute of Technology and a Sc.D. from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Mellon). Fiona M. Doyle is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engi- neering at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). She is also the execu- tive associate dean and associate dean for academic affairs in the UCB College of Engineering. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in metallurgy and materials science from the University of Cambridge, England, and an M.Sc. in extractive metallurgy and a Ph.D. in hydrometallurgy from Imperial College, University of London. Dr. Doyle’s main area of research is the solution processing of minerals and materials. She studies processes such as the leaching and transformation of minerals, solvent extraction, organic-phase reactions, hydrolysis, precipitation, crystallization, and electrochemical reactions from a fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. Much of her work aims to adapt the techniques used in the primary production of commodity minerals and metals for the commercial-scale processing of value-added, advanced materials. She is also engaged in ongoing research on improving the environmental impact and energy utilization associated with the production of minerals and materials. Dr. Doyle has served the state of California in assessing the environmental impact of mining and mineral process- ing operations and in developing policies for addressing environmental damage attributable to historic mining activities. Dr. Doyle is a member of the National Materials Advisory Board and also served as the chair of the panel that organied the Corrosion Education Workshop. David J. Duquette received his Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968. Following his postgraduate work, he performed research on elevated temperature materials, joining the faculty of the Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute in 1970. He is the author or coauthor of more than 160 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of environmental degradation of materials and electrochemical processing of semiconductor interconnects. He is a recipient of NACE’s Whitney Award for his contributions to corrosion science and the Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award. He is a fellow of ASM Inter- national and of NACE International. Professor Duquette’s research interests include the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of metals and alloys, with special reference to studies of environmental interactions. Current projects include studies of aqueous and elevated-temperature corrosion phenomena, the effects of corrosive environments on fatigue behavior, the environmental cracking of alloys, the role

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 10 of of corrosion science in understanding the planarization of metal interconnects on semiconductor devices, and the electrodeposition of semiconductor interconnects. A fundamental understanding of material–environment interactions is critical to the engineering application of metallic materials. Dr. Duquette was a member of the Panel on Electrochemical Corrosion, which has completed its work. gerald S. Frankel is a professor of materials science and engineering at the Ohio State University and director of the Fontana Corrosion Center. He earned an Sc.B. in materials science engineering from Brown University and an Sc.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before joining OSU in 1995, Dr. Frankel was a postdoctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute in zurich, Switzerland, and then a research staff member at the IBM Watson Research Center. He has more than 180 publications, and his primary research interests are the passivation and localized corrosion of metals and alloys, corrosion inhibition, and protective coatings. Dr. Frankel is past chairman of the Corrosion Division of the Electrochemical Society, past chairman of the Research Committee of NACE, and a member of the editorial board of the journal Corro- sion. He is a fellow of NACE International, the Electrochemical Society, and ASM International. He has received the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, the H.H. Uhlig Educators Award from NACE, and the Harrison Faculty Award and Lumley Research Award from the OSU College of Engineering. In 2005 he was on sabbatical at the Max Planck Institute for Iron Research in Düsseldorf, Germany. Dr. Frankel is a member of the organizing panel of NRC’s Corrosion Education Workshop. Richard B. griffin has been a faculty member at Texas A&M University since 1977. He earned a B.S. from Pennsylvania State University in metallurgy/metallurgical engineering and a Ph.D. from Iowa State University in metallurgy. His expertise is in materials, where he has taught and done research for more than 30 years. Dr. Griffin has worked in various areas of corrosion: erosion/corrosion, scc cracking of high- strength steels, and corrosion under organic coatings. He has also worked in tribology, where he studied the compound wear process. For almost a decade, he was a member of the Foundation Coalition team, which developed and implemented freshmen and sophomore engineering programs at Texas A&M University. Recently, Dr. Griffin helped in the establishment of a branch campus of Texas A&M University in Doha, qatar. He has received the Texas A&M University Association of Former Students Faculty Distinguished Achievement Award for student relations and the NACE Tech- nical Achievement Award. He is a member ASM, ASEE, and NACE. Sylvia M. Johnson is chief of the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. She holds a B.Sc. (honors) in ceramic engineer-

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aPPendix g 11 ing from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. She was at SRI International in Menlo Park, California, for 18 years, where she participated in and led a wide variety of projects for government and commer- cial clients, both domestic and international, becoming director of ceramic and chemical product development there before leaving to join NASA. A fellow of the American Ceramic Society since 1992, Dr. Johnson served as its vice president in 1996-1997 and as an elected board member from 2002 to 2005. In addition to many committee assignments, she has been counselor of the Northern California section since 1988, chaired five Pacific Coast regional meetings, and is currently U.S. representative to the International Ceramic Federation. From 1997 to 2002, Dr. Johnson served on the National Materials Advisory Board. During that time, she chaired two NMAB materials forums and was chair of the NMAB Workshop on Education and Workforce in Materials Science and Engineering. She has served on the National Institute of Standards and Technology evaluation board and on the Assessment Panel for Materials; is on the organizing committee of the National Space and Missile Materials Symposium; is a member of NRC committees; and currently serves on the evaluation board for materials science and technology at the Sandia National Laboratories. She holds six U.S. patents, and her 55+ publications are referenced in many journals, patents, and books. Frank E. karasz obtained a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Washington and a B.Sc. from Imperial College, London. He spent some time at the U.k. National Physical Laboratory and at General Electric Research Laboratory, Schenectady, before joining the newly established Polymer Science and Engineer- ing Department of the University of Massachusetts in 1967. During his years at UMass Dr. karasz served as codirector of the NSF Materials Research Laboratory and as director of the Center for Advanced Structural and Electronic Polymers. He is currently the Silvio O. Conte Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the Uni- versity of Massachusetts. His research activities are concentrated in three areas of polymer physics and chemistry: (1) polymer-polymer interactions in binary amorphous and amorphous crystalline blend systems: effects of copolymerization and microstructure; (2) computer simulations of polymer-polymer miscibility; and (3) quasi-elastic light scattering from macromolecular solutions. Dr. karasz has more than 570 publications and is the recipient of several national and inter- national awards. He was elected to the NAE in 1991 and is also a member of three foreign academies. Dr. karasz is a past member of the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and has served on past NRC committees including the NMAB’s Panel on Functional Organic and Hybrid Materials for the Committee on Materials Research for Defense-After-Next.

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 12 of Ronald M. Latanision is professor emeritus of materials science and engineering and nuclear engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and corporate vice president of Exponent, Inc. He is the author or coauthor of more than 200 scientific publications, is founder and cochair of the New England Science Teachers, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Acad- emy of Arts and Sciences. He has been a consultant to industry and government and has been active in organizing international conferences. He was appointed to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board by President Bush. Dr. Latanision received a B.S. in metallurgy from the Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the Ohio State University. During a sabbatical in 1982-1983, he served as a science advisor to the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology. He has served on a number of committees at the National Academies, including several committees on science education, and he also served on the Center for Education advisory board. He is a member of the organizing committee for the NRC’s Corrosion Education Workshop and the Com- mittee on Teacher Preparation Programs in the United States. He was a member of the now inactive Committee on Undergraduate Science Education. glenn N. Pfendt is the general manager for the Protective Coatings Division of A.O. Smith Corporation. A University of Illinois ceramic engineer, Dr. Pfendt has been an ACerS member for over 30 years and an active ECD committee participant for 20 years, serving as chair and more recently as division trustee. An ACerS fellow, a Mueller Award winner, and a member of NACE, Dr. Pfendt serves on the boards of the Associated Industries of kentucky, the Boone County High School, and the Porcelain Enamel Institute, where he is currently vice president. His business experience includes 15 years in his current position, where he is responsible for the division’s providing technical support on coatings, materials, equipment, and processes for the application and performance of coatings as well as their design, manufacture, and global sales both within A.O. Smith as well as to external cus- tomers, primarily in the appliance, welding, and primary metals industries. Specific product developments include multiphased coatings with hot water performance two to four times greater than was formerly available in the water heater market. Prior to A.O. Smith, Dr. Pfendt conceived, built, owned, and operated Ramtec Incorporated (Rapid Melting Technologies), a company that developed, manufac- tured, and sold materials and coatings for the welding and joining, glass decorating, and porcelain enamel industries. In addition to joint or team developments that included a moving-electrode, continually stirred, ton-per-hour rapid-melting glass reactor that he built and the development of lead-free glass coatings for decorat- ing tumblers, Dr. Pfendt was the sole developer of 24 new products that went to market over a 5-year period. His involvement in start-up companies and facilities includes three new ceramic product development laboratories and three coating

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aPPendix g 1 and materials manufacturing facilities. Additional project work includes respon- sibility for equipment and start-up of several process lines in existing facilities, including sole design-and-build responsibilities for a flux melting, grinding, and processing plant in Mexico. Lee W. Saperstein is dean emeritus of the School of Mines and Metallurgy and pro- fessor emeritus of mining engineering at the University of Missouri, Rolla (UMR); he served as dean from July 1, 1993, to June 30, 2004, retiring from the university at the end of December 2006. He has a B.S. in mining engineering from Montana School of Mines (now Montana Tech of the University of Montana) and a D.Phil. in engineering science from Oxford University, which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He was a faculty member in mining engineering at Penn State from 1967 to 1987 and for the following 6 years at the University of kentucky, where he was also chair of the Department of Mining Engineering. While at kentucky, he participated in an interim management team for the University of kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, where he was assistant director for clean coal fuels. His research specialization has been in environmental engineering of mines. He has published papers, proceeding articles, book chapters, and informal articles on this subject. He created Penn State’s first surface-mining design course and supervised training programs for miners, including health and safety training and job-skills training. He is a distinguished member of his professional society, the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME-AIME), which gave him the Ivan B. Rahn Award for Education. Dr. Saperstein served as the president of ABET in 1999-2000, and he has been representative director for SME-AIME as well as secretary, president, and past president of the board of directors. He served as chair, 1989-1990, of the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC), where as commissioner, he led evaluation teams to 13 universities. Before he was EAC chair, he chaired the Criteria Committee when it devised the concept of “engineering topics” and wrote the first references to “program objectives” and “outcome assessments.” A member of ABET’s Strategic Planning Committee, he was named a fellow of ABET. He most recently served as chair of the ad hoc task force on governance, which has delivered a new constitution, bylaws, and rules of procedure to ABET. He is a holder of its Linton E. Grinter Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Saperstein has served on four state committees of selection for the Rhodes Scholarship and was secretary for the state of kentucky. John R. Scully is professor of materials science and engineering and codirector of the Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering at the University of Virginia, which he joined in 1990. Earlier, Dr. Scully served as a senior member of the technical staff in the metallurgy department of the Sandia National Labo- ratories and ship materials engineer at the David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research

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assessment c o r ro s i o n e d u c at i o n 1 of and Development Center. Dr. Scully received B.E.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in materials science and engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests focus on the relationship between materials structure and composition and their environmental degradation or corrosion properties, including hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, localized corrosion, and passivity. His corrosion research includes study of advanced aluminum, magnesium, titanium, ferrous-iron-based and nickel-based alloys, and stainless steels, as well as amor- phous metals and intermetallic compounds. The development of methodolo- gies for lifetime prediction of engineering materials in corrosive environments is also of interest. Dr. Scully teaches materials science classes as well as classes on corrosion and electrochemical aspects of materials science at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. He is a fellow of the Electrochemical Society and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers. He received the A.B. Campbell and H.H. Uhlig Awards from NACE, the T.P. Hoar Award from the Institute of Corro- sion (U.k.), and the Francis Laque Award from ASTM for his research in corro- sion. He is a past recipient of the National Science Foundation Presidential young Investigator Award. He is chair of the NACE awards committee and past chair of the NACE research committee. He is past chair of ASTM subcommittee G1.11 on electrochemical techniques in corrosion. He has served on the editorial boards of Corrosion, Materials and Corrosion (Germany), and Metallurgical and Material Transactions. He served as a technical consultant to the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board in 2003, was a member of the Office of the Secretary of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Corrosion Control in 2004, and was the chair and organizer of the 2004 Gordon Conference on Aqueous Corrosion. He is a member of the NRC’s Corrosion Education Workshop organizing panel and the subsequent study group. gary S. Was received his Sc.D. from MIT in 1980. He is professor of nuclear engi- neering and radiological sciences and also of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan. He is currently the director of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute and has held positions as associate dean of the College of Engineering and chair of the Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Department. Dr. Was’s research is focused on materials for advanced nuclear energy systems and radiation materials science, including environmental effects on materials, radiation effects, and ion beam surface modification of materials and nuclear fuels. He has worked extensively in experiments and modeling of the effects of irradiation, corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and hydrogen embrittlement on iron- and nickel-based austenitic alloys. He has led the refinement of models for radiation-induced segregation to account for composition-dependent processes, and he developed the first comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic model for chromium carbide formation and chromium depletion in nickel-based alloys.

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aPPendix g 1 Most recently his group led the development of proton irradiation as a technique for emulating neutron irradiation effects in reactor structural materials and has conducted some of the first stress-corrosion-cracking experiments of austenitic and ferritic alloys in supercritical water. During his tenure at the University of Michigan, Dr. Was graduated 22 Ph.D. students, created three new graduate-level courses dealing primarily with irradiation effects on materials and on nuclear fuels, and an engineering summer course on ion beam modification of materials. He served as chair of the Organization of Nuclear Engineering Department Heads and coauthored the first American Society of Engineering Education report on man- power in the nuclear industry. He is currently serving on the board of directors of the Engineering Research Council of ASEE. He has helped to organize more than a dozen technical symposia and is a member of the ASEE, the Materials Research Society, the American Society for Metals, the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, NACE, Sigma Xi, and Tau Beta Pi. He was chair of the Materials Research Society’s fall 1994 meeting. He is director of four laboratories at the University of Michigan: the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory for Surface Modification and Analysis, the High Temperature Corrosion Laboratory, the Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory, and the Materials Preparation Laboratory. Dr. Was has received the Presidential young Investigator award from NSF and the Excellence in Research Award from the College of Engineering. In 2000, he was honored with the Champion H. Matthews Award from TMS and in 2004 he was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award by the Materials Science and Technology Division of the American Nuclear Society. He is a fellow of ASM International, NACE International, and the Ameri- can Nuclear Society. Dr. Was has published over 150 technical articles in refereed, archival journals, has presented over 200 conference papers, and has given more than 65 invited seminars and talks.

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