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Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Mary Jane England (Chair) is president of Regis College. She has served as director of child psychiatry at Brighton’s St. Elizabeth Hospital of Boston, then as director of clinical psychiatry at the Brighton-Allston Mental Health Clinic, and from 1974 to 1976 as director of planning and manpower for children’s services in the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. In 1976, she assumed the position of associate commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, and was a consultant to and chairperson of the Human Resources Policy Committee at the National Institute of Mental Health. As the first commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Social Services, she designed and implemented the new state agency to take social services out of the Department of Public Welfare and to ensure citizen involvement as she improved social services and child welfare policy. In 1983, she became associate dean for Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and director of the Lucius N. Littauer Master in Public Administration Program. In 1995–1996, she served as the president of the American Psychiatric Association. She has served as a member or chair of numerous committees or boards at the National Academies. Most recently she was a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and served as chair of the Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Adaptation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders. She has an M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine and trained in psychiatry at Boston University Hospital and at San Francisco’s Mt. Zion Hospital, completing her child and adolescent residency at Boston University and Boston City Child Guidance Clinic.



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C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Mary Jane England (Chair) is president of Regis College. She has served as director of child psychiatry at Brighton’s St. Elizabeth Hospital of Boston, then as director of clinical psychiatry at the Brighton-Allston Mental Health Clinic, and from 1974 to 1976 as director of planning and manpower for children’s services in the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. In 1976, she assumed the position of associate commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, and was a consultant to and chairperson of the Human Resources Policy Committee at the National Institute of Mental Health. As the first commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Social Services, she designed and implemented the new state agency to take social services out of the Department of Public Welfare and to en- sure citizen involvement as she improved social services and child welfare policy. In 1983, she became associate dean for Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and director of the Lucius N. Littauer Master in Public Administration Program. In 1995–1996, she served as the president of the American Psychiatric Association. She has served as a member or chair of numerous committees or boards at the National Academies. Most recently she was a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and served as chair of the Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Adap- tation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders. She has an M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine and trained in psychiatry at Boston University Hospital and at San Francisco’s Mt. Zion Hospital, completing her child and adolescent residency at Boston University and Boston City Child Guidance Clinic. 

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2 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola is professor of clinical internal medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis (UC Davis). He is the founding director of the Center for Reducing Health Disparities at the UC Davis Health System and the director of Community Engagement of the UC Davis Clinical Translational Science Center. He just completed a 4-year term as a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council, National Insti- tute of Mental Health. He is cochair of the National Institutes of Health’s Community Engagement Key Function Committee for the Clinical and Translational Science Awards, the immediate past chair of the Board of Directors of Mental Health America (formerly the National Mental Health Association), a board member of the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, and a steering committee and research scientist member of the National Hispanic Science Network on Drug Abuse. He is also a mem- ber of the International Advisory Committee of the Carso Health Institute. He is the coordinator for Latin America and the Caribbean of the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Dr. Aguilar- Gaxiola’s research includes cross-national epidemiologic research on pat- terns and correlates of mental disorders in general population samples and understanding and reducing health disparities in underserved populations. He has worked effectively to bridge research with services delivery and policy development and has been very active translating research into practical information that is of public health value to consumers and their families, service administrators, and policy makers with the purpose of informing health policy decisions and guiding program development. Dr. Aguilar-Gaxiola received his M.D. degree at the Autonomous University of Guadalajara in Mexico, his Ph.D. in Clinical-Community Psychology at Vanderbilt University, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship on health services research at University of California, San Francisco. He is the author of numerous scientific publications, and the recipient of several awards in- cluding the Peabody College of Vanderbilt University Distinguished Alum- nus Award, the Medal of Congress of Chile for work related to mental health research, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health’s 2005 National Minority Health Community Leader Award (Hispanic Community), Washington, DC. Kathryn E. Barnard is professor emerita of family and child nursing at the University of Washington’s School of Nursing. She is the founder and former director of the Center on Infant Mental Health and Development at the University of Washington. Her career has focused on promoting understanding of the impact of the first 3 years of life on children’s later physical, psychological, and emotional health. She has worked closely with the state of Washington’s Department of Health to provide consultation and training on child health assessment, parent-child interaction, and preven-

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 APPENDIX C tive health strategies. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1985 and was honored with the Gustav O. Leinard Award. She has also received 15 other major awards, including the Episteme Award, the highest honor in nursing, from the American Academy of Nursing, and the Martha May Eliot Award for Leadership in Maternal-Child Health. She has a Ph.D. in ecology of early childhood development from University of Washington. William Rigby Beardslee is the academic chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Children’s Hospital, Boston, and Gardner Monks Professor of child psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He has a long-standing research interest in the development of children at risk because of severe parental mental illness. He has been especially interested in the protective effects of self-understanding in enabling youngsters and adults to cope with adversity and has studied self-understanding in civil rights workers, survivors of cancer, and children of parents with affective disorders. He has received numerous awards, including the Blanche F. Ittleson Award of the American Psychiatric Association, has been a faculty scholar of the William T. Grant Foundation, and in 1999 received the Irving Philips Award for Prevention and the Catcher in the Rye Award for Advocacy for Children from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Currently, he directs the Preventive Intervention Project, which explores the effects of a clinician-facilitated, family-based preventive intervention designed to enhance resiliency and family understanding for children of parents with affective disorders. At the National Academies, he is a current member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults. Previously he served on the organizing commit- tee of the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, the Committee on Adolescent Health and Development, and the Committee on Prevention of Mental Disorders. He has an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University and trained in general psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and in child psychiatry and psychiatric research at Children’s Hospital in Boston. Howard J. Cabral is associate professor of biostatistics at the Boston Uni- versity School of Public Health and a codirector of the Biostatistics Gradu- ate Program and the Biostatistics Consulting Group. He is also a statistical consultant to the departments of public health in Boston and Cambridge. He has extensive experience in the analysis of longitudinal health data, espe- cially those collected in urban areas with ethnic diversity. His methodologi- cal interests are in the analysis of longitudinal data, the effects of missing data on statistical estimation, and statistical computing. His collaborative research examines the neurobiological changes in the brain among aging

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 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN animals as well as those resulting from stroke, dementia, and Parkinson’s disease among participants in the Framingham Study, the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on child development, a model to decrease homelessness among those dually diagnosed with mental illness and substance abuse disorder, methods of community outreach to those infected with HIV, and interventions to enhance the health and quality of life of retirees. He has published extensively on pediatric neurodevelopment and physical growth, as well as on the effects of behavioral interventions in AIDS and substance abuse. He has M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees from Boston University. Rosemary Chalk (Board Director) is the director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, a joint effort of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. She is a policy analyst who has been a study director at the National Academies since 1987. She has directed or served as a senior staff member for over a dozen studies in the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council, including studies on vaccine finance, the public health infrastructure for immunization, family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics and misconduct in science, and education finance. From 2000 to 2003, she also directed a research project on the development of child well-being indicators for the child welfare system at Child Trends in Washington, DC. She has previously served as a consultant for science and society research projects at the Harvard School of Public Health and was an Exxon research fellow in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was the program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from 1976 to 1986. She has a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati. Bruce E. Compas is the Patricia and Rodes Hart professor of psychology and human development and pediatrics at Vanderbilt University. He is also director of the clinical psychology training program and director of psychological oncology at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. Previously he was professor of psychology at the University of Vermont. His research has focused on processes of coping and self-regulation in response to stress and adversity in children, adolescents, and adults. He is specifically inter- ested in the relationships of stress, coping, and self-regulation to physical health/illness and psychopathology, as well as the development of interven- tions to enhance the ways that individuals and families cope with stress. His research involves both laboratory methods to study basic behavioral and biological processes and field research to understand self-regulation and coping in the context of psychopathology and physical illness. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psycho- logical Society. He has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University California, Los Angeles.

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 APPENDIX C Patrick R. Finley is professor of clinical pharmacology (primary emphasis in psychopharmacology and behavioral health) at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) in the School of Pharmacy. Previously he served as an adjunct faculty member in the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs health care system. His teaching, clinical, and research interests focus on the safe and efficacious use of psychotropic medications among the mentally ill population. His research interests in psychopharmacology span clinical, epidemiological, pharmacokinetic, and health policy domains. Clinically, he has been working with Kaiser Permanente of Northern California to implement an innovative practice model designed to improve the treat- ment of depression in the primary care setting, and his current practice is located in the UCSF Women’s Health Center Primary Care Clinic. He has experience working with a variety of consumer groups to ensure access to safe and equitable mental health care. He is a board-certified psychiatric pharmacist. He currently serves as a referee or editorial board member for approximately 16 medical journals. He has a Pharm.D. in pharmacokinetics from the University of California, San Francisco, where he completed his specialty residency; he completed his general residency at the University of Arizona Medical Center. Sherryl H. Goodman is professor in the Department of Psychology, with a joint appointment in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, at Emory University. Her research interests, grounded in the field of de- velopmental psychopathology, concern the mechanisms by which mothers with depression may transmit psychopathology to their children. She is also interested in the epidemiology of child and adolescent psychopathology, with a particular focus on risk and protective factors. She is the coeditor of Children of Depressed Parents: Alternative Pathways to Risk for Psycho- pathology (2002) and Handbook of Women and Depression (2006). She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. She was associate editor of the Journal of Family Psychology and is associate editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. She currently chairs the membership committee of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Waterloo . Constance Hammen is distinguished professor of psychology and psychia- try and biobehavioral sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. She served as chair of the clinical psychology area and director of clinical training there from 1994 to 2006. She is a clinical researcher specializing in mood disorders, with an emphasis on stress, family factors, and individual vulnerability factors predicting depression in adults and adolescents and the course of disorder in adults with bipolar illness. She served as cochair of the William T. Grant Foundation Consortium on Childhood and Adoles-

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 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN cent Depression and has written or coauthored numerous articles, books, and textbooks. She has served as president of the Society for Research in Psychopathology and on editorial boards of professional journals. She received the American Psychological Association–Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (Division 53) Distinguished Research Contri- bution Award in 2004 and the California State Psychological Association Distinguished Research Achievement in 2007. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Wisconsin. Reine Homawoo (Senior Program Assistant) is a staff member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She joined the staff in August 2007 fol- lowing completion of several studies in the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Military and Veterans’ Health. She is currently pursuing a B.S. in informa- tion system management at the University of Maryland University College. She has completed courses at the Northern Virginia Community College and also received an associate degree in computer programming (with hon- ors) from the National Center for Computer Studies in Togo, Africa. Elizabeth A. Howell, a board-certified obstetrician gynecologist, is assistant professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Health Policy and Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science at the Mount Si- nai School of Medicine. Her research interests include understanding and narrowing racial disparities in health and health care and addressing the health needs of low-income women of color, especially as they relate to antepartum and postpartum care. Her primary research focus has been on postpartum depression in minority and majority women. She is the recipi- ent of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Minority Faculty Develop- ment Award. She received her training in clinical epidemiology as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale Medical School. She has an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Mareasa R. Isaacs is executive director of the National Alliance of Multi- Ethnic Behavioral Health Associations. Previously she was associate pro- fessor in the Howard University School of Social Work. She has over 25 years of experience in government and nonprofit organizations and has held positions at the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Human Service Collaborative and senior executive positions in child mental health in the New York State Office of Mental Health and the District of Columbia Commission on Mental Health Services. Her area of expertise is cultural competence and she has trained, developed curricula, and written exten- sively on this subject. She has an M.S. in psychiatric social work from

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 APPENDIX C Simmons College and a Ph.D. in mental health administration and policy from Brandeis University. Sarah Joestl (Research Associate) is a doctoral candidate in Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, from where she also received her M.P.H. For her dissertation, she is testing the causal linkages between maternal depression, social support and parent- ing practices among incarcerated and low-income women in an attempt to integrate these disparate research areas into a comprehensive model. Other areas of interest include social epidemiology, minority health and health disparities, and quantitative methods in social science research. Previously, she has worked as project director on a National Institute of Nursing Research–funded study investigating maternal and child outcomes of a prison nursery program (M. Byrne, P.I.), and as graduate research assistant on a National Institute of Mental Health-funded study investigating stigma and status processes in interpersonal interactions (J. Phelan, P.I.). Hendree E. Jones is a licensed psychologist in the state of Maryland; an associate professor of behavioral biology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; and an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medi- cine. She is director of research for the Center for Addiction and Pregnancy and program director of Cornerstone, an after-care program for detoxified heroin-dependent patients. Her main areas of research interest are the examination of pharmacotherapies to treat drug dependence during preg- nancy and the impact of prenatal exposure to these medications and drugs of abuse; creating and testing behavioral interventions to help prevent re- lapse to drug use in pregnant women; and researching issues of differences in drug addiction. She is the principal investigator for four federally funded studies of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for pregnant drug- dependent women, including an international, multisite randomized clinical trial comparing the maternal and neonatal safety and efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine. She was chair of a symposium on the current state of the science of drug addiction and pregnancy held by the National Institute on Drug Abuse in July 2001. She is a member of the Drug Information Association and the Women’s Health Research Coalition and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Maryland Psychological Association. She has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia. Bridget B. Kelly (Program Officer) recently completed a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship at the National Acad- emies and now works at the Board on Children, Youth, and Families as

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 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN a consultant for projects that include the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults. She recently completed an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University. Wendy Keenan (Program Associate) provides administrative and research support for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and its various program committees. She also helps organize planning meetings and work- shops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families. Ms. Keenan has been on the National Academies’ staff for 10 years and worked on studies for both the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. As senior program assistant, she worked with the National Research Council’s Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Keenan taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from The Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in liberal studies from Georgetown University. Jane Knitzer is director of the National Center for Children in Poverty at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. She is a psy- chologist who has spent her career in policy research and analysis of issues affecting children and families, particularly related to mental health, child welfare, and early childhood. A clinical professor of population and family health at the Mailman School, she studies how public policies can improve outcomes of low-income children and better support families, particularly those who are most vulnerable. She is the author of Unclaimed Children: The Failure of Public Responsibility to Children and Adolescents in Need of Mental Health Services and coauthor of At the School House Door: An Examination of Programs and Policies for Children with Behavioral and Emotional Problems. She is a past president of Division 37 Child, Youth, and Family Services of the American Psychological Association and of the American Association of Orthopsychiatry. She was a member of Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Adaptation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders. She has an Ed.D. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and did postdoctoral work in community psychology at the Albert Einstein School of Medicine. She was a fellow at the Radcliffe Bunting Institute and has been on the faculty at Cornell Uni- versity and Bank Street College of Education. Sara Langston (Senior Program Assistant) is currently an aviation consul- tant with the Wicks Group PLLC, but previously she worked as a senior program assistant at the National Academies with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, providing administrative assistance and research sup-

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9 APPENDIX C port on various projects, including the report on parental depression, and coauthored a summary paper on adolescent risky driving behaviors. Ms. Langston has extensive experience with research and writing on matters of history, law, policy, science and technology, and is a scholarship recipient for the International Space University summer 2009 space studies program. She earned her J.D. from Golden Gate University School of Law with a specialization in International Law and an LL.M. (Advanced) in Air and Space Law from Leiden University, the Netherlands. Matthew D. McDonough (Senior Program Assistant) is a staff member with the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and has worked at the National Acad- emies in various capacities for 3 years. He is a 2004 graduate of George Washington University with a B.A. in anthropology and a B.A. in psychol- ogy. He is currently pursuing an M.A. in anthropology, concentrating in international development, at George Washington University. Patricia O’Campo is director of the Centre for Research on Inner City Health at St. Michael’s Hospital and professor of public health sciences at the University of Toronto. As a social epidemiologist, she has been conducting research on the social determinants of health and well-being among women and children for over 18 years. She has focused on methods development as part of her research, including application of multilevel modeling to understand residential and workplace contexts on women’s and children’s health, the application of concept mapping to increase un- derstanding of how residential neighborhoods influence well-being, and the development of monitoring methods for rare health events in small geographic areas. She has conducted a number of survey-based and longitu- dinal studies in the areas of the social determinants of adult mental health, intimate partner violence, and children’s well-being as well as clinic- and community-based evaluations of programs concerning smoking cessation, prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV, and prevention of infant mortality. Her contributions to the well-being of women and children have been recognized through early and mid-career awards given by national organizations in the United States. She serves on several local, federal, and international committees and boards, such as the Board of the Wellesley Institute in Toronto, the national Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System committee, and the national Canadian Institute for Health Research grant review panel on population health. She has a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Ardis L. Olson is professor of pediatrics and community and family medi- cine at Dartmouth Medical School. She is the director of the Clinicians

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0 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN Enhancing Child Health network, a practice-based primary care research network of pediatricians and family physicians. For 30 years she has com- bined community research, clinical practice, and education. Her focus has been on helping to address psychosocial issues and provide better preven- tive health care in primary care and community settings. Her research and community-based activities have focused on mothers with depressive symp- toms, children and families affected by chronic illnesses, and adolescent health risk reduction. She has an M.D. from and trained at the University of Minnesota and completed her pediatric residency at the University of Rochester’s Strong Memorial Hospital. Julienne Palbusa (Research Assistant) is a staff member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She joined the staff in December 2008. She is a 2007 graduate of The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA, where she earned a B.S. in psychology with a minor in kinesiology. Robert Phillips, Jr., is director of the Robert Graham Center in Washington, DC, a research center sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physi- cians dedicated to bringing a family practice and primary care perspective to health policy deliberations. He is on the faculty of the Department of Family Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University and at Georgetown University and of the School of Public Health and Health Services at George Washington University. He is vice chair of the U.S. Council on Graduate Medical Education and a member of the board of the North American Pri- mary Care Research Group. His research interests include physician–health system interactions and their effects on quality of care, geographic infor- mation systems, and collaborative care processes. He has an M.D. from the University of Florida College of Medicine and an M.S.P.H. from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He practices medicine at Fairfax Family Practice Center in Fairfax, Virginia. Frank W. Putnam is the director of the Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children and professor of pediatrics and child psychiatry at Chil- dren’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati. Previously he was scientific director of Every Child Succeeds, a home visitation program in Ohio, and now serves as deputy director. Prior to his move to Cincinnati in 1999, he worked with the intramural research program at the National Institute of Mental Health, where he held the positions of chief, Unit on Developmental Traumatology (1995–1999), senior clinical investigator in the Laboratory of Developmental Psychology (1986–1995), and staff psychiatrist in the Neuropsychiatry Branch (1982–1985). He has received numerous honors, including the Morton Prince Scientific Achievement Award in 1985; the Cornelia Wilbur Clinical Service Award in 1990; the U.S. Public Health

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 APPENDIX C Service Medal of Commendation in 1992; the Pierre Janet Scientific Writing Award in 1993; and the Ohio Martin Luther King Health Equity Award in 2006. His recent publications include research on the impact of trauma on child development, the experience of mothers in discussing sensitive issues in home visitation programs, and the development of quality infrastructure to support home visiting programs in a tristate area. He has an M.D. from Indiana University, conducted his residency in adult psychiatry at Yale University, and completed a fellowship in child psychiatry at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. Kimberly Scott (Senior Program Officer) joined the Institute of Medicine Board on Global Health in September 2005 as senior program officer for the study of the implementation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Previously she was an analyst on the health care team at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Prior to graduate studies at the Univer- sity of North Carolina, she was employed at Duke University’s Center for Health Policy, Law, and Management to integrate mental health services into the continuum of community- and clinic-based care for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 54 counties in North Carolina. She has been a national trainer and presenter for many public health issues, including HIV/AIDS, diabetes management, and cultural competence in the provision of clinical and social services in public health settings. As the executive director of an HIV/AIDS consortium, she managed a multimillion dollar budget to develop a comprehensive, ambulatory care system (includ- ing housing) for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS in 21 mostly rural counties in North Carolina. As a member of advisory committees for the secretary of North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services and the state’s health director for programmatic and policy issues related HIV care, prevention, and treatment, she participated in the process of obtaining a waiver for and developing the state’s Medicaid HIV/AIDS case management program. Leslie J. Sim (Study Director) has worked with the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and the Institute of Medicine since 2001. During that time she has progressed through several positions and studies as a research assistant, research associate, senior program associate, and currently as program officer with the Board on Children, Youth, and Fami- lies. Her most recent projects include directing a workshop study and report titled Influence of Pregnancy Weight on Maternal and Child Health (2006) and work on a study of adolescent health care services. In 2003, she re- ceived an Institute of Medicine inspirational staff award. In her earlier work with the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board, she provided web support for all board activities and provided research support for such

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2 DEPRESSION IN PARENTS, PARENTING, AND CHILDREN topics as military nutrition, the safety of infant formula, the application of the Dietary Reference Intakes, and food marketing to children and youth. She has a B.S. in biology with an emphasis on food science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and has taken graduate classes in food science from North Carolina State University and is pursuing a M.P.H. at A.T. Still University.