Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Participants

Ronald E. Aubert, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is currently vice president of Clinical Analytics and Outcomes Research (CAOR), at Medco Health Solutions, Inc. His responsibilities include directing and implementation of outcome research studies, managing client and product support and reporting, and providing consultation to internal and external clients. Areas of focus for CAOR include analyses to identify pharmacogenomic opportunities and evaluate the impact of pharmacogenomic testing on clinical outcomes, the impact of plan design changes on drug utilization, health disparities in medication adherence, and integrated medical and pharmacy claims studies to monitor quality of care indicators for external clients. CAOR supports the development and evaluation of new products such as Specialty Pharmacy, Medicare Part-D pharmacy benefit, and clinical safety products. Prior to coming to Medco Health, Dr. Aubert was a senior health care analyst at U.S. Quality Algorithms (USQA) Center for Health Care Research where he was principal investigator on randomized trials evaluating the effectiveness of nurse case management and a study evaluating screening and case management in high-risk Medicare enrollees. He was chief of the Epidemiology Section, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Aubert received a B.A. from Oberlin College and an M.S.P.H. and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he completed the Epidemic Intelligence Service fellowship at the CDC. He holds or has held the following appointments: faculty at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Emory University School of Medicine, the Medical College of Georgia and Morehouse School of Medicine, the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 233
Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Participants Ronald E. Aubert, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is currently vice president of Clinical Analytics and Outcomes Research (CAOR), at Medco Health Solutions, Inc. His responsibilities include directing and implementation of outcome research studies, managing client and product support and reporting, and providing consultation to internal and external clients. Areas of focus for CAOR include analyses to identify pharmacogenomic opportunities and evaluate the impact of pharmacogenomic testing on clinical outcomes, the impact of plan design changes on drug utilization, health disparities in medication adherence, and integrated medical and pharmacy claims studies to monitor quality of care indicators for external clients. CAOR supports the development and evaluation of new products such as Specialty Phar- macy, Medicare Part-D pharmacy benefit, and clinical safety products. Prior to coming to Medco Health, Dr. Aubert was a senior health care analyst at U.S. Quality Algorithms (USQA) Center for Health Care Research where he was principal investigator on randomized trials evaluating the effective- ness of nurse case management and a study evaluating screening and case management in high-risk Medicare enrollees. He was chief of the Epidemi- ology Section, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Aubert received a B.A. from Oberlin College and an M.S.P.H. and a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he completed the Epidemic Intelligence Service fellow- ship at the CDC. He holds or has held the following appointments: faculty at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Emory Univer- sity School of Medicine, the Medical College of Georgia and Morehouse School of Medicine, the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood 2

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE Johnson Foundation Improving Chronic Illness Care Initiative, and chair- man of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Diabetes Initiative advisory committee. Howard B. Beckman, M.D., is medical director of the Rochester Indi- vidual Practice Association (RIPA)—a 3,200-practitioner community-wide physician organization—which has contracted both for capitated care and consulting services since 1998. Dr. Beckman is also a clinical professor of medicine and family medicine at the University of Rochester School of Med- icine and Dentistry, where he conducts health services research and main- tains a small internal medicine and geriatrics practice. Dr. Beckman received his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and his M.D. from the Wayne State University School of Medicine. His primary administrative and research interests are creating and evaluating effective partnerships. Dr. Beckman served as a co-investigator for the Excellus/RIPA Robert Wood Johnson Rewarding Results grant. This work led to publications under his co-authorship that address the effects of pay-for-performance on reducing overuse, underuse, and misuse of services. Recently published work in the Journal of Healthcare Management, for example, demonstrated a positive return-on-investment for the pay-for-performance initiative and improved quality measures in treating diabetes and coronary disease. Melinda Beeuwkes Buntin, Ph.D., is a senior health economist at RAND, deputy director of RAND Health’s Economics, Financing, and Organization Program, and director of Public Sector Initiatives for RAND Health. She specializes in insurance benefit design, health insurance markets, provider payment, and the care use and needs of the elderly. Her current projects include a study of the effects of consumer-directed health care on health- care access, costs, and quality involving more than 40 employers offering consumer-directed plans; an assessment of national policy reform options involving extensive literature reviews and a microsimulation model; and an National Institute of Aging (NIA)-funded study of the effects of Medicare payment changes on post-acute care costs and outcomes. Dr. Buntin is also currently leading a study for Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evalua- tion of the determinants of increases in Medicare spending for physicians’ services. She was principal investigator (PI) on RAND’s recently completed project to monitor the effects of Medicare’s new inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system and to refine that payment system. Her work on that project included developing an access-to-care monitoring system for Medicare post-acute care, focusing on the effects of the inpatient rehabilitation prospective payment system. Dr. Buntin also completed work for the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) on the costs and outcomes of PAC for lower-extremity joint replacement patients. She has

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B also worked on projects and published in the areas of disease management, the market for individual health insurance policies, Medicare physician pay- ment rates, the financing of end-of-life care, and Medicare managed care plan design and payment. She graduated from the Ph.D. program in health policy at Harvard University, where she concentrated in health economics and specialized in the economics of the Medicare program. Her disserta- tion was entitled “Risk Selection in the Medicare Program” and included chapters on techniques for modeling healthcare costs, the effect of benefit packages on risk selection among Medicare+Choice Plans, and the costs of Medicare beneficiaries at the end of life. Troyen Brennan, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., is Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of CVS Caremark. In this role, Dr. Brennan directs CVS Caremarkís clinical affairs and oversees strategy development. Prior to join- ing CVS Caremark, Dr. Brennan was Chief Medical Officer of Aetna Inc. From 2000 to 2005, Dr. Brennan served as President and CEO of Brigham and Women’s Physician’s Organization. In his academic work, he was Pro- fessor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Professor of Law and Public Health at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Brennan received his M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Yale Medical School and his J.D. degree from Yale Law School. He completed his internship and residency in inter- nal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Christine K. Cassel, M.D., is president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ABIM Founda- tion, and a leading expert in geriatric medicine, medical ethics, and quality of care. Dr. Cassel, board certified in both internal medicine and geriatric medicine, has achieved a number of firsts for women in medicine—she was the first female board chair of ABIM from 1995 to 1996, the first female president of the American College of Physicians from 1996 to 1997, and the first female dean of Oregon Health & Science University in Portland in 2002. An active scholar and lecturer, she is the author or coauthor of 14 books and more than 150 journal articles on geriatric medicine, aging, bioethics, and health policy. She chaired influential Institute of Medicine (IOM) reports on end-of-life care and public health. Her most recent book is Medicare Matters: What Geriatric Medicine Can Teach American Health Care. Dr. Cassel is a representative to the National Quality Forum’s National Priorities Partnership, a member of the Commonwealth Fund’s Commission on a High Performance Health System, and the IOM Gov- erning Council. She also sits on the board of directors of the Greenwall Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, Premier, Inc., and other organizations with quality healthcare agendas. She was appointed by President Clinton

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE to serve on the President’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry and has been central to other national leadership efforts to inspire quality of care. Dr. Cassel has served as the president of the American Federation for Aging Research, dean of the School of Medicine and vice president for medical affairs at Oregon Health & Science University, and chair of the Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, where she was also professor of geriatrics and medicine. She spent a decade at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, as chief of Gen- eral Internal Medicine and a founding health policy director of the Harris School of Public Policy. Dr. Cassel received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago and her medical degree from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She is the recipient of numerous honorary degrees and is an honorary fellow of the Royal Colleges of Medicine of the United Kingdom and Canada and the European Federation of Internal Medicine, and she was elected a master of the American College of Physi- cians in 1997. Michael E. Chernew, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. One major area of his research focuses on assessing the impact of managed care on the healthcare mar- ketplace, with an emphasis on examining the impact of managed care on healthcare cost growth and on the use of medical technology. Other research has examined determinants of patient choice of hospital and the impact of health plan performance measures on employee and employer selection of health plans. Dr. Chernew is a member of the Commonwealth Foundation’s Commission on a High Performance Health Care System. In 2000 and 2004, he served on technical advisory panels for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that reviewed the assumptions used by Medicare actuaries to assess the financial status of Medicare trust funds. In 1998, he was awarded the John D. Thompson Prize for Young Investigators by the Association of University Programs in Public Health. In 1999, he received the Alice S. Hersh Young Investigator Award from the Association of Health Services Research. Dr. Chernew is a research associ- ate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and is on the editorial boards of Health Affairs and Medical Care Research and Review. He is also coeditor of the American Journal of Managed Care and senior associ- ate editor of Health Services Research. Dr. Chernew received an A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and Sciences, a B.S. from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School (economics), and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University, where his training focused on areas of applied microeconomics and econometrics.

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B Carolyn M. Clancy, M.D., is director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Prior to 2002 she was Director of AHRQ’s Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research (COER). Dr. Clancy, a general internist and health services researcher, is a graduate of Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Following clinical training in internal medicine, Dr. Clancy was a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She was also an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond before joining AHRQ in 1990. Dr. Clancy holds an academic appointment at George Washington University School of Medicine (clini- cal associate professor, Department of Medicine), is the senior associate editor of Health Services Research, and serves on multiple editorial boards (currently, Annals of Family Medicine, American Journal of Medical Qual- ity, and Medical Care Research and Review). She has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and has edited or contributed to seven books. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was elected a master of the American College of Physicians in 2004. Sabrina Corlette, J.D., is the director of Health Policy Programs at the National Partnership for Women & Families. As such, Ms. Corlette leads the organization’s efforts to promote access to quality, affordable health care. Before joining the National Partnership, Ms. Corlette was an attorney with the law firm of Hogan & Hartson, LLP, advising clients on health care issues relating to Medicare, Medicaid, health information technology, health privacy, and medical research laws and policies. Prior to joining Hogan & Hartson, Ms. Corlette served on the U.S. Senate Health, Educa- tion, Labor and Pensions Committee. There, she served as senior health policy adviser to Senator Tom Harkin, providing guidance on short- and long-term legislative strategy, drafting legislation, and building and main- taining coalitions on health care issues. Before her tenure on Capitol Hill, Ms. Corlette served as a research assistant and speechwriter to First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. Ms. Corlette received her law degree with high honors from the University of Texas at Austin and her Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, from Harvard University. Before law school, she spent a year in Nairobi, Kenya, assisting with efforts at the United States International University to develop an HIV/AIDS prevention program. Denis A. Cortese, M.D., is president and CEO of Mayo Clinic and chair of the Executive Committee. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees since 1997 and previously served on that board from 1990 to 1993. Fol- lowing service in the U.S. Naval Corps, he joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1976 as a specialist in pulmonary medicine. He was a member of the Board of Governors in Rochester before moving to

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1993. From 1999 to 2002 he served as chair of the Board of Governors at Mayo Clinic and chair of the Board of Directors at St. Luke’s Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. He is a director and former president of the International Photodynamic Association and has been involved in the bronchoscopic detection, localization, and treatment of early-stage lung cancer. He is a member of the Healthcare Leadership Council and the Harvard-Kennedy School Healthcare Policy Group, and is a former member of the Center for Corporate Innovation. He served on the Steering Committee for the RAND Information Therapy (Ix) Project Using Information Technology to Create a New Future in Healthcare, and the Principals Committee of the National Innovation Initiative. He also is a charter member of the Advisory Board of World Community Grid and a founding member of the American Medical Group Association Chairs/ Presidents/CEOs Council. Dr. Cortese is a graduate of Temple University, completed his residency at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, and is a professor of medicine in Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Dr. Cortese is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in England, and an honorary member of the Academia Nacional de Mexicana (Mexico). Helen B. Darling, M.A., is president of the National Business Group on Health (formerly the Washington Business Group on Health). Ms. Darling also currently serves as co-chair of the Committee on Performance Measure- ment of the National Committee on Quality Assurance. She is a member of: the Medical Advisory Panel, Technology Evaluation Center, run by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association; the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention; the Cancer Care Measures Steering Committee of the National Quality Forum; the Board of the VHA Health Foundation, along with a number of other advisory and editorial boards. From 1992 through 1998, Ms. Darling directed the purchasing of health benefits and disability for the Xerox Corporation, and was previously a principal at William W. Mercer. Earlier in her career, Ms. Darling was an adviser to Senator David Durenberger, the ranking Republican on the Health Subcommittee of the Senate Finance Committee. Ms. Darling received a master’s degree in demography/sociology and a bachelor’s of science degree in history/english, cum laude, from the University of Memphis. Justin B. Dimick, M.D., M.P.H., is a graduate of Cornell University and Johns Hopkins Medical School; he completed his residency training in general surgery at the University of Michigan and joined the faculty as an assistant professor of surgery in 2007. During his training, he completed a fellowship in health services research and received his M.P.H. degree at Dartmouth. Dr. Dimick’s research focuses on quality measurement and

OCR for page 233
29 APPENDIX B improvement. His previous work elucidated the strengths and limitations of existing quality measures, particularly hospital volume and risk-adjusted mortality rates. With funding from AHRQ, his current research is focused on developing better measures of surgical performance. This work applies statistical methods that combine information from multiple quality domains to create composite measures of performance. He is a quality measurement consultant to the Leapfrog Group, a coalition of private payers. He also serves on the Measurement and Evaluation Committee of the American College of Surgeon’s National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, M.D., Ph.D., is chair of the Department of Clinical Bioethics at the Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center at the National Insti- tutes of Health (NIH). He is also a breast oncologist. After graduating from Amherst College, Dr. Emanuel received his M.Sc. degree in biochemistry from Oxford University. He received his M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. degree in political philosophy from Harvard University, receiving the Toppan Award for the finest political science dissertation of the year. From 1987 to 1988, Dr. Emanuel was a fellow in the Program in Ethics and the Professions at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. After completing his internship and residency in internal medicine at Boston’s Beth Israel Hospital and his oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), he joined the DFCI faculty. He was associate professor at Harvard Medical School before joining the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Emanuel developed the Medical Directive, a comprehensive living will that has been endorsed by Consumer Reports on Health, Harvard Health Letter, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and many other publi- cations. He has published widely on the ethics of clinical research, healthcare reform, international research ethics, end-of-life care issues, euthanasia, the ethics of managed care, and the physician-patient relationship in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, JAMA, and many other medical journals. Dr. Emanuel’s book on medical ethics, The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity, has been widely praised and received hon- orable mention for the Rosenhaupt Memorial Book Award by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. He also has published No Margin, No Mission: Health- Care Organizations and the Quest for Ethical Excellence and coedited Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Com- mentary. Dr. Emanuel has received numerous awards, including election to the Institute of Medicine and to the Association of American Physicians. Hippocrates Magazine selected him as Doctor of the Year in Ethics. He received the American Medical Association-Burroughs Wellcome Leader- ship Award and a Fulbright Scholarship (which he declined). Dr. Emanuel served on President Clinton’s Health Care Task Force, the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, and the bioethics panel of the Pan American Health

OCR for page 233
20 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE Organization. He has been visiting professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of California, Los Angeles, and Brin Professor at Johns Hopkins Medical School. A. Mark Fendrick, M.D., is a professor of internal medicine in the School of Medicine and a professor of health management and policy in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Dr. Fendrick received a bachelor’s degree in economics and chemistry from University of Pennsylvania and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Fendrick com- pleted his residency in internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania where he was a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program. He is co-director of the Center for Value-Based Insurance Design at the University of Michigan. Dr. Fendrick’s research focuses on the clinical and economic assessment of medical interventions with special attention to how technological innovation influences clinical practice and impacts healthcare systems. He has authored more than 200 articles and book chapters and lectures frequently on the health and cost implications of medical interventions to diverse audiences around the world. Dr. Fendrick remains clinically active in the practice of general internal medicine. He is the coeditor-in-chief of the American Journal of Managed Care and is an editorial board member for three additional peer-reviewed publications. His perspec- tive and understanding of clinical and economic issues have fostered col- laborations with numerous government agencies, health plans, professional societies, and healthcare companies. He serves on the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee. Dr. Fendrick has served on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care and the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. T. Bruce Ferguson Jr., M.D., is professor and chairman of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences at the East Carolina Heart Institute and the Brody School of Medicine at ECU in Greenville, North Carolina. He is also the clinical chief of the Integrated Comprehensive Cardiovascular Service Line at the ECHI-PCMH. Dr. Ferguson graduated from Medical School at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and finished his General and Cardiothoracic Surgery training at Duke University Medical Center under David C. Sabiston, Jr., M.D., in 1988. He then returned to Washington University where he achieved the rank of associate professor with tenure until 2006. He was subsequently professor of Surgery and Physiology in the Department of Surgery at LSUHSC in New Orleans until early 2006, when he was recruited by Dr. W. Randolph Chitwood to assist in the establish- ment of the East Carolina Heart Institute. In 2007, Dr. Ferguson became the inaugural chair of the completely integrated Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, which combined cardiovascular medicine, cardiothoracic surgery,

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B and vascular surgery into a single academic organizational structure, which is also mirrored by the organizational structure of the Integrated Service Line. Dr. Ferguson was chair of the STS Council on Quality, Research and Patient Safety for 6 years, and in this capacity was involved extensively with the STS National Databases. He was the PI on a 7-year grant addressing QI in CABG, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. He is currently chair of the Joint STS-AATS Workforce on Government Rela- tions and Advocacy, a highly visible and volatile effort in the current era of Health Care Reform in the United States. Howard P. Forman, M.D., M.B.A., is a health services researcher focus- ing on diagnostic radiology, health policy, and healthcare leadership. His most recent publications address teleradiology, international outsourcing, the incentives that medical students respond to in choosing a specialty, and ensuring quality in imaging services. Professor Forman teaches health- care policy in the Yale School of Public Health and healthcare economics in the Yale College Economics Department. He is the faculty founder and director of the M.D.-M.B.A. program between Yale School of Medi- cine and Yale School of Management, as well as the co-director of the School of Management’s M.B.A. for Executives Program. As a practicing cross-sectional and emergency-trauma radiologist, he is actively involved in patient care and issues related to financial administration, healthcare compliance, and contracting. He has worked in the U.S. Senate, as a health policy fellow, on Medicare legislation. He is the treasurer of the American Roentgen Ray Society. Jean Paul Gagnon, Ph.D., is director of Public Policy at sanofi-aventis in Bridgewater, New Jersey. He received a B.S. in pharmacy, an M.S. in pharmacy administration from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in pharmacy administration from Ohio State University. He is a former professor and division head of Pharmacy Administration in the School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina and has worked for sanofi-aventis for 17 years. He has written more than 60 articles in peer- reviewed journals and has made presentations on a variety of issues includ- ing Medicare, Part D, Evidence-Based Medicine, and the effect of federal policy on the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacy practice. In 2002, he received the APhA Hugo H. Schaefer Award for outstanding volunteer con- tributions to the profession of pharmacy. In 1981-1982, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow in Washington, DC, and worked as a committee staff person on the Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Health. He was chairman of the Health Outcomes Committee of the Pharmaceutical Research Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) from 1997 until 2001, president of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

OCR for page 233
22 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE for the 1985-1986 year, served as treasurer and a Board of Trustee member of the American Pharmaceutical Association from 1991 until 1997, served as president of the International Association of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research from 1996 until 1997 and was its treasurer from 1998 until 2004, and was a member of the Board of Trustees and treasurer for the U. S. Pharmacopeia from 1995 until 2005. In his present position, he is involved in public policy activities for sanofi-aventis. His interests include pharmacoeconomic and health outcomes research, the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act, importation of prescription drugs, health policy issues affecting prescription drugs, and the pharmaceutical industry. Arthur (Tim) Garson, Jr., M.D., M.P.H., is provost of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville and former dean of the School of Medicine. He graduated (Phi Beta Kappa, summa cum laude) from Princeton University in 1970 and received his M.D. (Alpha Omega Alpha) from Duke Univer- sity in 1974, remaining at Duke for pediatric residency through 1976. In 1979, he completed his pediatric cardiology fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, becoming chief of pediatric cardiology in 1988. He has been a visiting professor in more than 100 institutions. He is the author of more than 450 publications, including 7 books. In 1992, he received a master’s degree in public health from the University of Texas, Houston. Also in 1992, he joined the faculty at Duke University, becom- ing associate vice chancellor for health affairs, where he served as medical director of government relations for the Medical Center and professor in the Sanford Institute of Public Policy. He has served as special consultant in health programs and policy to the State of Texas Department of Health and the North Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Commission. He chaired the North Carolina Health Planning Commission Committee charged with drafting legislation on practice guidelines, report cards, and malpractice reform. Paul B. Ginsburg, Ph.D., is president of the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Founded in 1995 by Dr. Ginsburg, HSC conducts research to inform policy makers and other audiences about changes in organization of financing and delivery of care and their effects on people. HSC is widely known for the objectivity and technical quality of its research and its success in communicating it to policy makers and the media, as well as to the research community. Ginsburg is particularly known for his understanding of health care markets and health care costs. In 2007, for the fifth time, Dr. Ginsburg was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 100 most powerful persons in health care. Dr. Ginsburg served as the founding executive director of the predecessor to the Medicare Payment

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B Advisory Commission. Widely regarded as highly influential, the Commis- sion developed the Medicare physician payment reform proposal that was enacted by the Congress in 1989. Dr. Ginsburg was a senior economist at RAND and served as deputy assistant director at the Congressional Budget Office. Before that, he served on the faculties of Duke University and Michigan State University. He earned his doctorate in economics from Harvard University. Ronald Z. Goetzel, Ph.D., M.A., is both the director of the Emory Uni- versity Institute for Health and Productivity Studies (IHPS) and the vice president of consulting and applied research for Thomson Reuters. The mis- sion of the IHPS is to bridge the gap between academia, the business com- munity, and the healthcare policy world—bringing academic resources into policy debates and day-to-day business decisions and bringing health and productivity management issues into academia. Before moving to Emory, Dr. Goetzel was at Cornell University. Dr. Goetzel is responsible for lead- ing innovative research projects and consulting services for healthcare pur- chaser, managed care, government, and pharmaceutical clients interested in conducting cutting-edge research focused on the relationship between health and well-being and work-related productivity. He is a nationally recognized and widely published expert in health and productivity man- agement (HPM), return-on-investment (ROI), program evaluation, and outcomes research. Before joining Thomson Reuters (formerly Medstat) in 1995, Dr. Goetzel was vice president of Assessment, Data Analysis and Evaluation Services at Johnson & Johnson Health Care Systems. Earlier in his career, Dr. Goetzel was the medical school education program evaluator at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he was appointed to the psychiatry faculty. Dr. Goetzel earned his doctorate in organizational and administrative studies and his M.A. in applied social psychology from New York University and his B.S. degree in psychology from the City College of New York. Gail Griffith is a writer and communications consultant to mental health organizations focused on suicide prevention. Throughout her career, she has been engaged in advocacy, public relations, and fundraising designing and implementing international humanitarian programs and cause-related campaigns. She is a graduate of University of California, Berkeley, and holds a graduate degree from Georgetown University. She is the author of Will’s Choice, published by HarperCollins in May 2005. Will’s Choice, which examines the paucity of treatment options for families with children with mental illnesses, was a finalist for the publishing industry’s 2005 Books for a Better Life Award. In June 2006 Ms. Griffith received the Tipper Gore, Remember the Children Award from Mental Health America

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE for her advocacy. She is a member of a number of mental health advocacy organizations and from 2005 to 2008 served on the board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. In 2004, she was appointed patient representative to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) scientific advisory committee charged with investigating the possible link between antidepressant medication and suicidal thinking in young people. She con- tinues to consult for the FDA as a permanent consumer representative to the psychopharmacological drugs committee and recently served as lead author of an assessment of the 2001 Surgeon General’s National Strategy on Suicide Prevention. Douglas Johnston, M.A., is the executive director of the Center for Infor- mation Technology Leadership (CITL) at Partners HealthCare System. Mr. Johnston has diverse experience as a health systems researcher and con- sultant. As the executive director, he leads the development and execution of strategy and operations for a research center focused on examining the value that information technology brings to health care. Previously, as the director of research for the New England Healthcare Institute, Mr. Johnston managed a team of researchers and policy analysts in assessing the impact of innovations in drugs, medical devices, and information technologies on the healthcare system in New England and nationally. Mr. Johnston has also been a senior analyst at CITL, an analyst at Forrester Research, and a consultant at Ernst & Young, LLP. He has published widely in the general healthcare trade press and in peer-reviewed journals and has been awarded research grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the California HealthCare Foundation, and the eHealth Initiative. Mr. Johnston received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a master’s from Harvard University focusing on medical ethics and health policy. He has also served as an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. Newell E. McElwee, Pharm.D., M.S.P.H., is vice president of evidence- based strategies at Pfizer where he leads a group of scientists focused on evidence-based medicine, health technology assessment, the use of obser- vational data for assessing clinical effectiveness, and the application of evi- dence to coverage decisions. He has worked in the pharmaceutical industry since 1992 following a career in academia. His educational background is in pharmacy (B.S., University of Louisiana; Pharm.D., Mercer University) and epidemiology (M.S.P.H., University of Utah). Newell also completed a clinical pharmacy residency and a research fellowship in clinical pharma- cology and toxicology. He currently serves on the AHRQ Effective Health- care Stakeholder Group, the AHRQ Centers for Education, Research, and Training (CERT) Steering Committee, the board of the Center for Medical Technology Policy, the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy “Format”

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B Steering Committee, the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health Advisory Board (Tufts), the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Advisory Board (University of Washington), the Health Sector Advisory Council (Duke), and the Health Industry Forum Steering Com- mittee. Newell has had leadership roles in the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making. He has a faculty appointment at Tufts School of Medi- cine in Boston. J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P., is a long-time contributor to national and international health policy leadership, now a senior scholar at the Institute of Medicine, and executive director of the IOM Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care. He is also an elected member of the IOM. He previously was senior vice president at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and, unusual for political posts, held continuous appointments through the Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administra- tions, with responsibility for coordinating activities and policies in dis- ease prevention and health promotion. Programs and policies created and launched at his initiative include the Healthy People process setting national health objectives, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (with the U.S. Department of Agriculture), the Ten Essential Services of Public Health, the RWJF Health and Society Scholars Program, the RWJF Young Epidemiology Scholars Program, and the RWJF Active Living family of programs. Internationally, he chaired the World Bank-European Commission Task Force on postwar reconstruction of the health sector in Bosnia and worked as both field epidemiologist and state coordinator for the World Health Organization’s successful smallpox eradication program in India. David O. Meltzer, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Medicine and an associated faculty member in the Harris School and the Department of Economics. Meltzer’s research explores problems in health economics and public policy with a focus on the theoretical foundations of medical cost-effectiveness analysis and the effects of managed care and medical specialization on the cost and quality of care, especially in teaching hospitals. Meltzer is currently completing a randomized trial comparing the use of doctors who specialize in inpatient care (“hospitalists”) with tradi- tional physicians in six academic medical centers. Meltzer received his M.D. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago and completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is director of the Center for Health and the Social Sciences at the Univer- sity of Chicago and also co-director of the Program on Outcomes Research Training and the M.D.-Ph.D. program in the social sciences. He serves on

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE the faculty of the Graduate Program in Health Administration and Policy, the Population Research Center, and the Center on Aging. Meltzer is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and past presi- dent of the Society for Medical Decision Making. He has served on panels examining the future of Medicare for the National Academy of Social Insurance and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and U.S. organ allocation policy for the IOM. He recently served on an IOM panel examining the effectiveness of the U.S. drug safety system and cur- rent serves on the HHS Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Healthy People 2020, which aims to established health objectives for the U.S. population. Arnold Milstein, M.D., M.P.H., is the medical director of the Pacific Busi- ness Group on Health (PBGH) and the chief physician at Mercer Health & Benefits. PBGH is the largest employer healthcare purchasing coalition in the United States. His work and publications focus on healthcare purchas- ing strategy, the psychology of clinical performance improvement, and clini- cal innovations that reduce total healthcare spending. He co-founded both the Leapfrog Group and the Consumer-Purchaser Disclosure Project. He heads performance measurement activities for both initiatives and is a con- gressional MedPAC commissioner. The New England Journal of Medicine series on employer-sponsored health insurance described him as a “pioneer” in efforts to advance quality of care. He was selected for the highest annual award of the National Business Group on Health (NBGH), for nationally distinguished innovation in healthcare cost reduction and quality gains. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine and is a faculty member at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF) Institute for Health Policy Studies. He was educated at Harvard (B.A., economics), Tufts (M.D.), and UC-Berkeley (M.P.H., health services evaluation and planning). Tracey A. Moorhead is president and CEO of DMAA: The Care Con- tinuum Alliance. DMAA convenes all stakeholders providing services along the care continuum toward the goal of population health improvement. These care continuum services include strategies such as health and well- ness promotion, disease management, and care coordination. Based in Washington, DC, DMAA represents more than 200 corporate and indi- vidual members in promoting the role of population health improvement to raise the quality of care, improve health outcomes, and reduce preventable healthcare costs for people with chronic conditions and those at risk for developing chronic conditions. Ms. Moorhead is recognized as a leading healthcare advocate with considerable experience in public policy and coali- tion management. She effectively directs policy formulation and strategic advocacy efforts, as well as represents the disease management community

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B before the media, allied organizations and constituents, and all levels of government. Ms. Moorhead previously served as executive director of the Alliance to Improve Medicare (AIM), a bipartisan coalition advocating comprehensive Medicare improvements. AIM supported enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003. As AIM’s executive director, Ms. Moorhead coordinated and moderated educational and policy briefings for congressional staff; directed AIM’s policy research, development, and communications efforts; and developed grassroots programs in conjunction with AIM member organizations. In addition to her role with AIM, Ms. Moorhead served as vice president, Government Relations, for the Healthcare Leadership Council (HLC). In this role, she coordinated a nationwide grassroots outreach campaign to senior citizens and partner organizations to increase awareness and partici- pation in new Medicare benefits. Samuel R. Nussbaum, M.D., is executive vice president and chief medical officer for WellPoint, Inc. He oversees corporate medical policy, clini- cal pharmacy programs, health improvement and quality resources, pro- grams for clinical excellence, disease and care management, and clinical informatics to optimize care for members. Dr. Nussbaum also has respon- sibility for the Health Management Corporation (HMC) and HealthCore subsidiaries. His principal responsibilities continue to include serving as chief spokesperson on medical issues, guiding the corporate vision regard- ing quality of care and its measurements, leading efforts to assess cost of care performance, and developing a strategy to foster further collabora- tion with physicians and hospitals to strengthen and improve patient care. Dr. Nussbaum earned his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He trained in internal medicine at Stanford and Harvard and in endocrinology and metabolism at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, where he served on the faculty for 20 years. His clinical and basic research has led to new therapies to treat skeletal disor- ders and new technologies to measure hormones in blood. He has served as president of the Disease Management Association of America, chairman of the National Committee for Quality Health Care, chair of America’s Health Insurance Plan’s (AHIP’s) Chief Medical Officer Leadership Council, and a member of the AHIP Board, and he is professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine. Parashar B. Patel, M.P.A., joined Boston Scientific Corporation (BSC) as vice president of health economics and reimbursement for BSC’s Health- care Strategies and Programs Group in 2003. Parashar is responsible for the company’s corporate and site health economics and reimbursement functions, chiefly focusing on the development and implementation of

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE global strategic and reimbursement and legislative initiatives. He is also closely involved in health economics analysis and outcomes research for the BSC. Prior to joining, Parashar was deputy director of the Hospital and Ambulatory Policy Group in the CMS Center for Medicare Management. The group was responsible for Medicare payment policy for a wide range of acute and ambulatory care services including inpatient and outpatient hospital services and physician services. He has extensive experience in healthcare financing policy through his work with the American Associa- tion of Health Plans, the Office of (then) Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and Connecticut’s Medicaid agency. He holds a B.A. in political science and a master of public affairs from the University of Connecticut. L. Gregory Pawlson, M.D., M.P.H., is the executive vice president of the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). NCQA is a leading evaluator of healthcare services and is especially well known for its develop- ment of HEDIS clinical performance measures. At NCQA, beyond his role as a senior member of the leadership team, Dr. Pawlson has oversight and responsibility for research and analysis, federal and state contracting, and performance measure development. While at NCQA, Dr. Pawlson has played a major role in the development and maintenance of the current set of HEDIS measures and other NCQA measures including those used in physician rec- ognition programs and pay-for-performance projects. Before joining NCQA in January 2000, Dr. Pawlson was senior associate vice president for health affairs and worked with the quality and utilization management efforts of the George Washington (GW) Health Plan and Faculty Practice. Prior to that Dr. Pawlson had served as chairman of the Department of Health Care Sci- ences (DHCS) and director of the Institute for Health Policy, Outcomes and Human Values at GW. During a sabbatical year at GW in 1987, Dr. Pawlson served as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy fellow and health policy aide on the staff of Senator George Mitchell (D-Maine) and in 1997-1998 was a scholar in residence at the American Association of Medical Colleges, at its Center for the Assessment and Management of Change in Academic Medicine. Within organized medicine, Dr. Pawlson has served as president or on the board of a number of organizations including the American Geriatrics Society, the Society for General Internal Medicine, the Bon Secours Health System, and the American College of Medical Quality. Dr. Pawlson has more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals and has received numerous awards and citations for his teaching and research. Steven D. Pearson, M.D., M.Sc., is the founder and president of the Insti- tute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Pearson also serves as the cur-

OCR for page 233
29 APPENDIX B rent vice chair of the Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advi- sory Committee, and he is a senior scientist in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. He attended UCSF School of Medicine and completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. An internist, health services researcher, and ethicist, he was awarded an Atlantic Fellowship from the British government in 2004 to pursue policy studies at the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in London, England. He returned to the United States to serve as special adviser, Technology and Coverage Policy, within the Coverage and Analysis Group at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services from 2005 to 2006. He also served as senior fellow at America’s Health Insurance Plans from 2006 to 2008. His published work includes more than 75 peer-reviewed articles and the book No Margin, No Mission: Health Care Organizations and the Quest for Ethical Excellence, published in 2003 by Oxford University Press. Sir Michael Rawlins, M.D., has been chairman of the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) since its formation in 1999. He is also chairman of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (since 1998). He is an honorary professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, and emeritus professor at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He was the Ruth and Lionel Jacobson Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne from 1973 to 2006. At the same time he held the position of con- sultant physician and consultant clinical pharmacologist to the Newcastle Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust. He was vice chairman (1987-1992) and chairman (1993-1998) of the Committee on Safety of Medicines. Murray N. Ross, Ph.D., is vice president, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, and director of the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy in Oakland, California. His current work focuses on how the U.S. health system can use new medical technologies more effectively. Before joining Kaiser Permanente in 2002, Dr. Ross was an adviser to the U.S. Congress. He served almost 5 years as the executive director of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, a nonpartisan agency charged with making recom- mendations on Medicare policy issues to Congress. Previously, he spent 9 years at the Congressional Budget Office, lastly heading up the group charged with assessing the budgetary impact of legislative proposals affect- ing Medicare and Medicaid. Dr. Ross earned his doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and completed his under- graduate work in economics at Arizona State University.

OCR for page 233
20 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE John C. Rother, J.D., is the group executive officer of policy and strategy for AARP. He is responsible for the federal and state public policies of the association, for international initiatives, and for formulating AARP’s over- all strategic direction. He is an authority on Medicare, managed care, long- term care, Social Security, pensions, and the challenges facing the boomer generation. Prior to coming to AARP in 1984, Mr. Rother served eight years with the U.S. Senate as special counsel for labor and health to former Senator Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.), then as staff director and chief counsel for the Special Committee on Aging under its chairman, Senator John Heinz (R-Pa.). He serves on several boards and commissions, including Genera- tions United, the National Health Care Quality Forum, the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, National Academy on Aging, and Civic Ventures. He is frequently quoted in the news and an invited speaker at conferences and congressional briefings. Throughout 1996, Mr. Rother was on special sabbatical assignment to study the consumer implications of the managed care revolution and the economic challenges facing the boomer generation. John Rother is an honors graduate of Oberlin College and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Donald A. Sawyer, J.D., joined AstraZeneca in 2003 as counselor to meet the legal needs of the Managed Care Business Group, but from there moved into the business in various roles, all in support of managed markets. Don held the role of director of Managed Markets Contract Operations. There, Don led the department responsible for administration and payment of private payer rebate and charge-back contracts. Moving forward, Don held the position of contract strategy director for Nexium with responsibility for the creation, negotiation, and implementation of contract strategies associated with the Nexium brand with respect to commercial and govern- ment customers. Don advanced into the role of senior director in Contract Strategy, where he provided leadership for the development and launch of the Medicare Access Standard Contract Offer and was responsible for nego- tiations across our commercial and Part D portfolio. Don held the position of area sales director in the Southeast Business Center prior to joining the USBC Managed Markets Team as executive director of Managed Markets in May 2007. On July 1, 2008, he was promoted to vice president, Man- aged Markets Sales and Strategy, where he has continued to serve as an integral member of the Marketing and Sales Operations leadership team. In October 2008, Don accepted an invitation to serve on the Center of Value-Based Insurance Design (V-Bid) Advisory Board at the University of Michigan, where he provides expertise, insight, and direction in the adop- tion of health insurance principles that balances cost and quality. Don’s educational background includes a bachelor of arts degree in economics

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B from the University of Delaware. He also holds a J.D. from Widener Uni- versity School of Law, Wilmington, Delaware. Dennis P. Scanlon, Ph.D., is a researcher focusing on health systems improve- ment, including the role of information, incentives, and behavior change for improving healthcare outcomes. He led a federally funded research project examining the state of quality improvement activities at managed care plans, focusing on the degree to which health plans were using perfor- mance measures for quality improvement activities. He was awarded the Investigator in Health Care Policy Research Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study whether private and public sector healthcare purchasers are able to effectively use their health purchasing leverage to drive improvements in quality and reductions in medical errors. Dennis also served as an investigator on a five-year AHRQ-funded project with researchers from the University of California-San Francisco and the Univer- sity of Michigan examining the impact of insurance market competition on the quality of care. More recently, Dr. Scanlon is the principal investigator for the Center for Health Care Strategies’ Regional Quality Improvement demonstration, and he is also leading the research for the RWJF Aligning Forces for Quality Initiative, a $300 million program to bring together stakeholders for improved quality, efficiency, and value in 14 communities across the United States. Scanlon is also working with the Commonwealth Fund and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to plan a demonstra- tion to reduce preventable and avoidable hospital readmissions. Dr. Scanlon has been on the faculty at Penn State for 13 years in the Department of Health Policy & Administration and has taught courses at the undergradu- ate and graduate levels. Currently he serves as the professor in charge of the doctoral program in health policy and administration. He received his bachelor’s degree in economics from Villanova University, his master’s in economics from the University of Pittsburgh, and his Ph.D. in health services organization and policy from the University of Michigan with a concentration in economics and public health. Martín-J. Sepúlveda, M.D., FACP, is vice president of Global Well-Being Services and Health Benefits for the IBM Corporation. He leads a worldwide team of professionals providing health care policy, strategy and design, and comprehensive employee well-being services to IBM’s global businesses. He serves on the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, the Board of Directors of the Employee Benefits Research Institute, the Board of Advisors to the School of Public Health at the Univer- sity of Iowa, the Board of the National Business Group on Health, and chairs its Global Health Benefits Institute. He received his B.A. from Yale University; his M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Harvard University; completed his inter-

OCR for page 233
22 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE nal medicine residency at the University of California Hospital & Clinics; completed his occupational medicine residency and epidemic intelligence service at NIOSH, CDC; and completed his internal medicine fellowship at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Occupational and Environ- mental Medicine, and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Karen Smith, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is vice president of External Medi- cal Affairs (EMR) for the U.S. business of AstraZeneca PLC (AZ), head- quartered in London, England. As one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies with healthcare sales of $29.5 billion, AZ is a leader in the research, development, manufacture, and marketing of prescription phar- maceuticals and the supply of healthcare services. Through the combined benefits of global capabilities and local market relationships, AZ is able to respond quickly and effectively to changing business needs in the targeted therapeutic areas of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neuroscience, respira- tory, oncology, and infection. Dr. Smith joined the company in 2007 to lead EMR in the creation of strategic partnerships with key organizations and stakeholders across the U.S. market. Immediately prior to joining AZ, Dr. Smith held management roles with Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) in Australia, Canada, and the United States. Most recently, Dr. Smith was responsible for developing and managing post-marketing clinical trials across all brands and therapeutic areas for the BMS U.S. operation. In addi- tion to holding senior management and medical roles in a number of large pharmaceuticals companies, Dr. Smith was the CEO-managing director of Boron Molecular, a start-up biotech company focused on R&D and pro- duction of biopharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. Dr. Smith holds an M.D. from the University of Warwick (UK) specializing in cardiology, a Ph.D. in oncology molecular genetics from the University of Western Australia, a master’s in business administration from the University of New England (Australia), and a master’s in law (medical law major) in spring 2008 from the University of Salford (UK). A permanent citizen of the United States, Dr. Smith holds dual citizenship in Australia and Great Britain. Reed V. Tuckson, M.D., is a graduate of Howard University, Georgetown University School of Medicine, and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania’s General Internal Medicine Residency and Fellowship Pro- grams. Dr. Tuckson is currently executive vice president and chief of medical affairs at UnitedHealth Group, a Fortune 25 diversified health and well-being company. He is responsible for working with all of the company’s business units to improve the quality and efficiency of health services. Formerly, Dr. Tuckson served as senior vice president, Professional Standards, for the American Medical Association (AMA). He is former president of the

OCR for page 233
2 APPENDIX B Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles; has served as senior vice president for programs of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation; and is a former commissioner of public health for the District of Columbia. Dr. Tuckson is an active member of the Institute of Medicine and served as chairperson of its Quality Chasm Summit Committee and a member of the Committee on the Consequences of the Uninsured. He is immediate past chair of the Secretary of Health and Human Services’ Advi- sory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society. Additionally, he recently served as a commissioner, Certification Commission on Health Information Technology, and is currently a member of the Performance Measurement Workgroup, Ambulatory Care Quality Alliance (AQA) and of the Quality Workgroup, American Health Information Community. Dr. Tuckson has also held other federal appointments, including cabinet-level advisory committees on health reform, infant mortality, children’s health, violence, and radiation testing. Most recently, he was named one of Modern Healthcare’s “Top 25 Minority Executives” in health care for 2008 and to Ebony magazine’s “2008 Power 150: The Most Influential Blacks in America” list. David M. Walker is president and CEO of the Peter G. Peterson Founda- tion, where he advocates for specific solutions, works proactively with grantees and other partners to build strong coalitions, and encourages and engages in grassroots efforts to bring pressure on Washington to act. As comptroller general of the United States and head of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) from 1998 to 2008, spanning both Democratic and Republican administrations, Dave served as the federal government’s chief auditor. Appointed by President Bill Clinton and confirmed unani- mously by the U.S. Senate, he was an outspoken, nonpartisan advocate for addressing the major fiscal and other sustainability challenges facing the country. He also enacted transformational reforms at the agency and within the accountability profession. Prior to his appointment to run the GAO, Dave served as a partner and global managing director of Arthur Andersen, LLP, and in several government leadership positions, including as a public trustee for Social Security and Medicare from 1990 to 1995 and as assistant secretary of labor for Pension and Welfare Benefit Programs during the Reagan administration. He also serves on the boards of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and the Partnership for Public Service. He has authored two books, is a regular commentator, and is the subject of the critically acclaimed documentary I.O.U.S.A., which arrived in theatres around the country in August 2008. Harlan F. Weisman, M.D., is the Chief Science and Technology Officer, Med- ical Devices & Diagnostics, Johnson & Johnson. In this role, Dr. Weisman is a member of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices & Diagnostics

OCR for page 233
2 VALUE IN HEALTH CARE Group Operating Committee (GOC). He supports the GOC in steering the Group’s scientific and technical agenda, leading the Group’s investments in Group-level technologies, and sponsoring the Group’s research and develop- ment (R&D) talent agenda. Prior to this, he was company group chairman, Research & Development, Pharmaceuticals, for Johnson & Johnson, where he had executive oversight of the ALZA Corporation, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development (J&JPRD), and TransForm Phar- maceuticals, Inc. Previously, Dr. Weisman was President of J&JPRD. Prior to this, he was president, Research & Development, at Centocor, another member of the Johnson & Johnson family of R&D companies. Before join- ing Centocor in 1990, Dr. Weisman was assistant professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, consultant cardiolo- gist at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and director of the Experimental Cardiac Pathology Laboratory there. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. After his residency in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, he did his post- graduate fellowship training in cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Weisman is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the Councils on Clinical Cardiology and Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology of the American Heart Association. He is also a member of the American College of Physicians, the American Federation for Clinical Research, the American Medical Association, and the New Jersey Medical Society. Dr. Weisman is an author of more than 90 journal articles and book chapters in the fields of cardiovascular disease and medical product development.