Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Chris G. Whipple, Chair, is a principal in the Emeryville, California, office of ENVIRON International Corporation, an environmental consulting firm. His professional interests are in risk assessment, and he has consulted widely in this field for private clients and government agencies. Much of his work involves radioactive materials or mercury. Dr. Whipple is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and he currently serves as co-chair of the Academies’ Report Review Committee. He previously served as chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Radioactive Waste Management and as a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He has served on and chaired numerous NRC committees and is a long-time member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Whipple received his B.S. in engineering science from Purdue University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.


Steven M. Larson, Vice Chair, is attending physician, Department of Radiology, member, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and professor, Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell University Medical Center. Dr. Larson is chief of nuclear medicine service, vice chairman for radiology research, and director of the Laurent and Alberta Gerschel Positron Emission Tomography Center, Department of Radiology Memorial Hospital. Dr. Larson is also laboratory head, Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, and co-director of the Ludwig Trust Center for Immunotherapy of Sloan Kettering Institute. Dr. Larson’s research focus is molecular imag-



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Chris G. Whipple, Chair, is a principal in the Emeryville, California, office of ENVIRON International Corporation, an environmental con- sulting firm. His professional interests are in risk assessment, and he has consulted widely in this field for private clients and government agencies. Much of his work involves radioactive materials or mercury. Dr. Whipple is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and he currently serves as co-chair of the Academies’ Report Review Committee. He previ- ously served as chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Radioactive Waste Management and as a member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He has served on and chaired numerous NRC committees and is a long-time member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Whipple received his B.S. in engineering science from Purdue University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. Steven M. Larson, Vice Chair, is attending physician, Department of Radiology, member, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and profes- sor, Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell University Medical Center. Dr. Larson is chief of nuclear medicine service, vice chairman for radiology research, and director of the Laurent and Alberta Gerschel Positron Emis- sion Tomography Center, Department of Radiology Memorial Hospital. Dr. Larson is also laboratory head, Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, and co-director of the Ludwig Trust Center for Immunotherapy of Sloan Kettering Institute. Dr. Larson’s research focus is molecular imag- 

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 APPENDIX B ing and targeted radiotherapy, particularly positron emission tomography (PET) and radioantibody-targeted therapy in oncology. He is a fellow of both the American College of Nuclear Physicians and the American College of Radiology. He is currently director of the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. He is the author and coauthor of more than 500 scholarly publi- cations and has been awarded numerous honors including the Wylie medal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Academy of Molecular Imaging Distinguished Scientist Award (2007), the Wagner Lecture Medal of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Hevesy Awards of both the Euro- pean and the U.S. Society of Nuclear Medicine, Radiology Researcher of the Year (2004) and the Pendergrass Awards of the Radiologic Society of North America. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Cynthia Atkins-Duffin is an authority on physical and chemical behavior of actinide and fission product elements. She is the E Program Manager (Energy, Environment and Non-Proliferation) in the Global Security Direc- torate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Prior to this assignment she was the deputy associate director for strategic planning and resources in the Energy and Environment Directorate. Previously she has served as the Applied Energy Technologies program leader and the Yucca Mountain Program deputy program leader. In addition, she was deputy materials pro- gram leader in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate from 1999 to 2002, and deputy director of the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute for Trans- actinium Science from 1996 to 1999. Earlier she was principal investigator in the hydrology and radionuclide migration program within the nuclear weapons programs. Dr. Atkins-Duffin’s honors include the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate Award (2001), the Energy Directorate Award (2000), and the American Institute of Chemists Award for Outstanding Undergraduate in Chemistry. She has authored or coauthored more than 40 refereed publications and given about 80 presentations. Dr. Atkins-Duffin received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Purdue University and her B.S. in chemistry from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Anthony Boardman is Van Dusen Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy and Business Economics Division at the University of British Columbia (UBC). His research interests include analysis of the effects of ownership on performance, privatization, public-private partnerships, cost- benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses, and strategic management in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. He is coauthor of a textbook, Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice. Dr. Boardman has extensive industry and consulting experience with a wide range of organizations in the private and public sectors. He has been a member of the Pharmacoeconomic Initiative

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 APPENDIX B of British Columbia (1995–2001) and is currently serving a second, 5-year term as a member of the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board in Canada. Prior to taking up his position at UBC he taught at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Boardman studied for his undergraduate degree at the University of Kent at Canterbury in England and obtained his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Jeff Bostock retired from Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., as vice president for engineering and construction with responsibility for all engi- neering activities within the Oak Ridge nuclear complex. He has extensive experience managing projects as a Department of Energy (DOE) contrac- tor. He has also served as vice president of defense and manufacturing and manager of the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, a nuclear weapons fabrication and manufacturing facility. His career at Y-12 included engineering and mana- gerial positions in all of the various manufacturing, assembly, security, and program management organizations. He also served as manager of the Pa- ducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. He was a member of the committees that produced the NRC reports, Proliferation Concerns: Assessing U.S. Efforts to Help Contain Nuclear and Other Dangerous Materials and Technolo- gies in the Former Soviet Union and Protecting Nuclear Weapons Material in Russia. Mr. Bostock has also served as a panel member for the annual NRC assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories. He was also a member of the NRC Committee on Oversight and Assessment of Department of Energy Project Management between 2000 and 2005. Mr. Bostock has a B.S. in industrial engineering from Pennsylvania State University and an M.S. in industrial management from the University of Tennessee. He is a graduate of the Pittsburgh Management Program for Executives. G. Brian Estes is a consulting engineer and retired rear admiral, U.S. Navy Civil Engineer Corps. He has extensive experience in construction management, project delivery methods, federal contracting practices, and DOE environmental management projects. He was a member of the NRC Committee for Oversight and Assessment of Department of Energy Project Management, the Committee on Outsourcing of Design and Construction Management Services for Federal Facilities, and the Committee to Assess the Policies and Practices of the DOE to Design, Manage, and Procure Environmental Restoration, Waste Management, and Other Construction Projects, and has served on four other NRC committees, three of which have dealt with DOE. He is currently a member of the NRC Board on In- frastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) and the Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB). He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Maine, an M.S. in civil

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 APPENDIX B engineering from the University of Illinois, and is a registered professional engineer in Illinois and Virginia. Milton Levenson is nationally recognized for his ability to apply creative new insights to major engineering challenges in the nuclear industry and for his organizational and leadership skills. Currently an independent con- sultant, Mr. Levenson is a chemical engineer with 65 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work related to nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactors, advanced reactors, and remote control. His professional experience includes research and operations positions at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, and Bechtel, where he retired as vice president. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976. Mr. Levenson is a fellow and past president of the American Nuclear Society, a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), and a recipient of the AIChE Robert E. Wilson Award in Nuclear Chemical Engineering. He is the author of more than 150 pub- lications and presentations and holds three U.S. patents. Mr. Levenson has served on several NRC committees and has also served on the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. Irvin Osborne-Lee is an associate professor and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Prairie View A&M University. Previously, he spent 13 years in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. His expertise is in developing disposition pathways and treat- ment methods for problematic wastes. He has authored or coauthored about 50 papers in this area. He is also committed to positively impacting society through academic enterprise: educating and empowering students, motivating and inspiring faculty, and building key research programs. His honors and awards include the 2001 Appreciation Award of the National Society of Black Engineers and the Service to Society Award of AIChE, in which he has held a number of positions. Dr. Osborne-Lee is a member of AIChE, the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, Sigma Xi, and the National Council of Black Engineers and Scientists. He is currently a member of the board of directors for the Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority and was previously a director of AIChE. He received his Ph.D., M.E., and B.S. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin in 1985, 1983, and 1979, respectively. Gene Peterson did his postdoctoral work in chemistry and materials sciences at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the area of thermochemical water splitting for hydrogen production. He joined the Argonne National Labora-

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 APPENDIX B tory in 1978, performing research in the area of actinide chemistry, and in 1979, he joined the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he is currently the Chemistry Division leader. The Chemistry Division is a multiprogram capability organization that consists of 320 chemical professionals with a budget of approximately $100 million. At the Los Alamos National Labo- ratory, Dr. Peterson has specialized in medical isotope production and ap- plications research and development (R&D). He has successfully managed large multidisciplinary programs in these areas at Los Alamos for more than 15 years. A notable program success during his tenure was the construction of a new $23.5 million 100 MeV Isotope Production Facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for the production of accelera- tor isotopes. Throughout his years of service at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, he has worked on many unique projects and has more than 60 peer-reviewed publications in areas involving coordination chemistry, lanthanide and actinide chemistry, synthetic chemistry, inorganic geochem- istry, environmental chemistry, materials processing, analytical chemistry, nuclear and radiochemistry, and biomedical research. He is currently par- ticipating in the development of the Center for Isotopes in Medicine within the Advanced Studies Institute, which is a joint collaboration among the University of California, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the New Mexico State Universities, including the University of New Mexico. Radiopharmaceutical R&D focused on isotopes produced at LANSCE will be a major thrust area of this center within the Advanced Studies Institute. Dr. Peterson received his B.S. degree from the Illinois Benedictine College in Lisle, Illinois, in 1971 and his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the Arizona State University in 1976. Richard C. Reba was a postdoctoral research fellow in nuclear medicine at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. He subsequently served on the fac- ulties of the Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University, and the University of Chicago, and he is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. He is an elected fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Nuclear Physicians. He has been a consultant for several federal government departments and agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, DOE, Veterans’ Administration, and Federal Aviation Agency, and international agencies, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). He has been a member of six federal government advisory com- mittees charted by the U.S. Congress, and he has been a member of three previous NAS/NRC committees. Dr. Reba has been elected president of the largest scientific nuclear medicine organization, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the largest socioeconomic nuclear medicine organization, the American College of Nuclear Physicians. His research interests have been

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 APPENDIX B in the area of drug development, specifically the research and application of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET radio- pharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Dr. Reba currently serves on the faculty of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., as professor of radiology (nuclear medicine) and internal medicine (cardiology) and as a staff physician in the Department of Nuclear Medi- cine of the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Reba is author or coauthor of 330 scientific papers, book chapters and reviews. Iain Ritchie is recently retired from IAEA where he spent the final 13 years of his career highlighted by a distinguished service award and appointment by the director general as crosscutting coordinator for research reactors. This responsibility for coordinating all of the agency’s activities on research reactors included liaison with Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. Prior to joining the agency, Dr. Ritchie had a career as a research scientist spanning more than 25 years at the Whiteshell Nuclear Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Among the highlights of this period was the management of a proton accelerator, direction of a group carrying out radiation damage experiments, and the appointment as adjunct professor of physics at the University of Manitoba. He is an expert in the field of defects in metals and has authored more than 200 technical papers and reports. In 1992 he received the Canadian Institute of Mining Metallurgy Award for Materials Engineering and in 1993 an R&D 100 Award for development of an inno- vative ultrasonic technique. Dr. Ritchie earned his B.S. in physics and Ph.D. in metals physics from the University of Wales in the United Kingdom. Thomas Ruth is the head of the life science program at TRIUMF and senior scientist at the British Columbia Cancer Research Centre. In addition, Dr. Ruth is adjunct professor of pharmaceutical sciences and medicine at the University of British Columbia, chemistry at Simon Fraser University, and physics at the University of Victoria. He is a leader in the production and application of radioisotopes for research in the physical and biologi- cal sciences. His efforts at establishing PET as a quantitative tool for in vivo biochemistry has been recognized by the Canadian Nuclear Medicine Society’s highest award of meritorious status. He has served on a multitude of committees, including the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Medi- cal Isotopes and on the NRC’s Committee on the State of the Science in Nuclear Medicine. In addition he serves as an expert on radioisotope pro- duction for IAEA. He has published more than 225 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. Dr. Ruth received his Ph.D. in nuclear spectroscopy from Clark University.

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 APPENDIX B Raymond G. Wymer is former director of the Chemical Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is now a consultant for the labora- tory, DOE, and its contractors on all aspects of nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management. He is an associate member of the National Academies and is a member of the National Academies Board on Nuclear and Radia- tion Studies. He served on a United Nations Special Commission team to Iraq in the mid 1990s evaluating Iraq’s uranium enrichment capability by chemical exchange. He is coauthor of a book Chemistry in Nuclear Tech- nology and co-edited a book on Light Water Reactor Fuel Reprocessing. He was an editor of the journal Radiochimica Acta for more than 10 years until his retirement. Dr. Wymer is an adjunct professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University. He has received recognition for his contributions in the nuclear area, including the Robert E. Wilson Award in Nuclear Chemical Engineering from AIChE for outstanding work on the nuclear fuel cycle. He received a B.A. from Mem- phis State University and an M.A. and a Ph.D from Vanderbilt University. Jasmina Vujic is professor and chair in the Department of Nuclear Engineer- ing at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). She is also a direc- tor of an interdepartmental cutting-edge computing facility that provides computing services for advanced research and teaching to the College of Engineering departments at UCB. Before joining the Berkeley faculty, she worked at Argonne National Laboratory. Dr. Vujic is an internationally recognized expert in the advanced method development for nuclear reactor analysis and design, as well as for medical applications of radiation. Her fields of specialization also include radiation detection and measurement, nuclear reactor physics, neutron and photon transport, radiation protec- tions, and engineering aspects of medical imaging and cancer therapy. Her general geometry collision probability code GTRAN2 has been licensed to General Electric and Toshiba. Also, the GTRAN2 code was chosen by DOE in 1991 as the computational methodology for assembly design of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core for tritium production. Dr. Vujic and a colleague developed a program in bionuclear and radio- logical physics for students in the bioengineering program. She has worked on diverse problems ranging from reactor core design to analysis of the neutronic behavior of fissile materials in geologic repositories, to modeling radiation transport for medical diagnostics in boron neutron capture ther- apy and for nuclear medicine imaging. She is holder of one U.S. patent and author of a book and 240 technical publications, including over 60 papers published in leading archival journals, and several awarded papers. She has been consulting for General Electric, Transware, VeriTainer, Aerotest Operations, and other companies. Dr. Vujic received the Prytanean Faculty Award and several other awards including an American Nuclear Society

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0 APPENDIX B best paper and best program awards and the 1991 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Exceptional Performance Award. She earned her B.Sc. in electrical and nuclear engineering and an M.Sc. in engineering physics from the University of Belgrade, and an M.Sc. and her Ph.D. in nuclear science from the University of Michigan.