FIGURE 1 Basic Carnegie classification: distribution of institutions and percentage of total enrollment, 2005.

FIGURE 1 Basic Carnegie classification: distribution of institutions and percentage of total enrollment, 2005.

NOTE: Fall enrollment may not reflect the total number of students served over the course of a year. Tribal colleges (32) account for 0.10% of total enrollment.

SOURCE: 2005 Carnegie Classification; National Center for Education Statistics, IPEDS Fall Enrollment (2004).

addition, excluding the associate colleges, they enroll the largest number of undergraduates and the largest proportion of the minority student population, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 2.

Many workshop participants shared the belief that ERIs potentially can contribute more significantly to innovative research and must play a more prominent role in sustaining the nation’s technological competitiveness. However, the research universities receive 83 percent of total federal obligations for research and development (R&D), according to NSF FY 2005 data (Table 2). Moreover, federal academic science and engineering (S&E) obligations totaled $28.3 billion in FY 2005, and the leading 20 universities (ranked in terms of total S&E obligations) received 34 percent of that total. Generally, ERIs also reflect a relatively low level of research activity as measured by science and engineering (S&E) R&D expenditures, non-S&E R&D expenditures, and S&E research staff (postdoctoral appointees and non-faculty research staff with doctorates).3

3

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, March 7, 2006.



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