argument for retaining the restrictions on eligibility was that the funding levels—at least for the programs presented in the workshop—were not large enough to support a fully open, nationwide set of programs.

On the other hand, not all of the restrictions are rational. One participant noted that Dartmouth, a research university, is eligible for EPSCoR funding now that New Hampshire has been declared an EPSCoR state. The lack of universal access does mean that these programs are unavailable to a large percentage of the 70 percent or so of the nation’s students who are not in doctorate-granting universities.

Despite the dearth of widely available opportunities through federal agencies, other approaches to enhancing the administrative infrastructure were mentioned throughout the workshop as well. These strategies are summarized in Table 3 below, along with the federal programs described above.

TABLE 3 Resources for Research-Enhancing Initiatives

Source

Sample ERI Strategy

State legislature

Galileo project (USG)

University system

Faculty Development Program (USG)

Private foundations and organizations

Office of Intellectual Property (USP)

Federal agencies

 

NSF STAR Alliance

Partnerships across institutional types

NSF EPSCoR

Faculty and student research collaboration

NSF PREM

Research training and professional development

NSF MSP and LSAMP

NIH MORE Programs

Mentoring

NIH EARDA

Technical assistance

Army and DOE Mentor-Protégé

Grantsmanship workshops

SBIR and STTR

 

Outsourcing

Grants Plus

 

Intellectual Property Solutions

Partnerships

Sponsored programs administration

 

Technology transfer functions

 

Regulatory compliance support

 

Staff training

 

Research capacity building

Internal funding

Start-up funds

 

Research awards

 

Return of overhead receipts

 

Research incentives for new research projects



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