Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Panelists

WORKSHOP SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS

Steven A. Adams, M.P.H., has served as the deputy director of the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) Program located within the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from the time of its inception in 1999. As such, he has been intimately involved with the development and evolution of the national doctrine for response to public health crises and directly engaged with state and local authorities in the planning and implementation of the civilian medical response to large-scale public health emergencies. In addition to programmatic leadership, Mr. Adams has managed large-scale emergency responses and led CDC’s rapid field response teams in the aftermath of events such as 9/11. He has served CDC in a variety of leadership roles for 20 years in contingency response programs as well as in public health efforts as varied as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) field research and radiological dose reconstruction related to Cold War–era nuclear weapons production. Mr. Adams earned an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Thomas N. Ahrens, Pharm.D., currently serves as chief of Emergency Pharmaceutical Services for the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). He has served as the California SNS Coordinator since January 2001. Dr. Ahrens coordinates and supervises all CDPH programs on emergency response and recovery activities and services related to the SNS (including the Chempack Project, the Cities Readiness Initiative, selection of and pur-



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Panelists WORkSHOP SPEAkERS AND PANELISTS Steven A. Adams, M.P.H., has served as the deputy director of the U.S. Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) Program located within the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from the time of its inception in 1999. As such, he has been intimately involved with the development and evolution of the national doctrine for response to public health crises and directly engaged with state and local authorities in the planning and implementation of the civilian medical response to large-scale public health emergencies. In addition to programmatic leadership, Mr. Adams has managed large-scale emergency responses and led CDC’s rapid field response teams in the aftermath of events such as 9/11. He has served CDC in a variety of leadership roles for 20 years in contingency response programs as well as in public health efforts as varied as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) field research and radiological dose reconstruction related to Cold War–era nuclear weapons production. Mr. Adams earned an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Thomas N. Ahrens, Pharm.D., currently serves as chief of Emergency Phar- maceutical Services for the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). He has served as the California SNS Coordinator since January 2001. Dr. Ahrens coordinates and supervises all CDPH programs on emergency response and recovery activities and services related to the SNS (including the Chempack Project, the Cities Readiness Initiative, selection of and pur- 

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 APPENDIX C chase of pharmaceuticals for the Hospital Preparedness Program and the state’s antiviral cache for pandemic preparedness) and all CDPH’s emergency plans pertaining to the requesting of medical supplies and pharmaceuticals in response to planning needs and emergency response. He has been directly involved in various emergency response activations of the State Emergency Operations Center and has served as a Public Health Agency representative and a Public Health Branch coordinator. In addition, Dr. Ahrens has served as the director of the CDPH Joint Emergency Operations Center during emergency response activations and as warehouse director during functional exercises involving the receipt and distribution of the SNS. His background includes working as a pharmacist, with 29 years experience with the Cali- fornia departments of health services, public health, and mental health, in addition to private hospital and retail pharmacy services. He received his doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Southern California. Richard L. Alcorta, M.D., FACEP, is a board-certified emergency medicine physician. He started his EMS career as an emergency medical technician– ambulance and went on to become a paramedic in California. While per- forming as an EMT-P in Imperial County, California, he also performed as a sworn sheriff reserve. He received his B.S. degree at San Diego State University. In 1983 he graduated from Howard University School of Medi- cine and was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha (Honor Medical Society). He completed his emergency medicine residency at Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, and in 1986 he started as a faculty member of the emergency department at Johns Hopkins Medi- cal Center. He has practiced emergency medicine at Suburban Hospital Shock Trauma Center since 1987. From 1992 to 1994 he was the state EMS director for Maryland, and in 1995 he was appointed the state EMS medical director at the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems. He has developed and delivered numerous presentations on chemi- cal, biological, radiological, and traumatic (including blast) injures as well as on incident management to EMS, nurses, and physicians. He was the state medical director for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Prepared- ness Program (CSEPP) during the neutralization of 1,600 tons of mustard chemical warfare agent in Maryland as well as a medical advisor to the U.S. Secret Service. Dr. Alcorta has spoken as a subject matter expert at National CSEPP, B.A.T.T.L.E. FBI, and National Disaster Medical System conferences. Joseph A. Barbera, M.D., is codirector of the George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management and has blended clinical practice, academics, research, preparedness, and emergency response activi- ties throughout his professional career. He is associate professor of engineer-

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0 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT ing management and clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University. Dr. Barbera created and teaches masters- and doctoral-level academic courses in emergency management and has completed multiple applied research projects focusing on health and medical systems in emergency response. He directed emergency management activi- ties at teaching hospitals in New York (Bronx Municipal Hospital Center) and Washington, DC (George Washington University Hospital), and he has provided emergency management consultation and training for a wide vari- ety of health care organizations and federal and state agencies. Dr. Barbera coordinated implementation of one of the first hospital mass patient decon- tamination and treatment facilities and chaired the establishment of a com- prehensive hospital mutual aid system in Washington, DC, well before the 9/11 generated attention in this area. He has enjoyed a 2-decade career as an emergency responder to major disasters for the U.S. government and others. Experiences include scene response to hurricanes (2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma and others), mine disasters, earthquakes (Baguio City, Philippines; Northridge, California; and Tou-Liu, Taiwan), mass terrorism (the Oklahoma City bombing and the 9/11 Pentagon and World Trade Center attack sites), biological terrorism (anthrax, 2001), and tsunami (Banda Aceh, Indonesia). Dr. Barbera has authored numerous scientific and technical papers related to medical and public health emergency manage- ment. He earned his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medi- cine and completed residency training in both family practice (University of Connecticut) and emergency medicine (Albert Einstein College of Medicine), and he maintains board certification in emergency medicine. Steven M. Becker, Ph.D., is associate professor of public health and vice chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Becker has nearly two decades of experience dealing with the public health, emergency planning, community response, and risk communication aspects of incidents involving invisible toxic agents. He is one of only a small number of U.S. researchers to have carried out extensive overseas fieldwork related to all three major types of invisible agents: chemicals, infectious disease, and radiation. This includes fieldwork during a major chemical accident in Great Britain; onsite work during the 1999 nuclear accident in Tokaimura, Japan; follow-up work in Ukraine and Belarus related to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster; and fieldwork during the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in the United Kingdom. Dr. Becker served as principal investigator for the radiological/nuclear risk communi- cation component of the Pre-Event Message Development Project, a major CDC-funded study to improve emergency communication during terrorism incidents. The multiyear, multisite project identified key concerns and infor- mation needs for the general public, first responders, hospital emergency

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 APPENDIX C department personnel, and the public health workforce. The project also provided the most extensive research to date on the public information aspects of improvised nuclear device (IND) scenarios. In 2005 Dr. Becker was elected to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measure- ments, where he also serves as a member of the Advisory Panel on Public Policy and PAC 3 (Nuclear and Radiological Safety and Security). In addi- tion, Dr. Becker has served on several national policy panels dealing with CBRNE terrorism and is a coauthor of the landmark NCRP 138 report, Management of Terrorist Incidents Involving Radioactive Material. James S. Blumenstock became chief program officer, public health practice, for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) in June 2007. His portfolio includes the state public health practice program areas of infectious and emerging diseases, immunization, environmental health, injury prevention, and public health preparedness and security, including pandemic influenza preparedness. He also serves as a member of the association’s executive management team responsible for enterprise- wide strategic planning, administrative services, member support, and pub- lic health advocacy. Prior to his arrival at ASTHO on November 1, 2005, Mr. Blumenstock was the deputy commissioner of health for the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, from which he retired after almost 32 years of career public health service. In this capacity, he had exec- utive oversight responsibilities for a department branch with more than 650 staff members and an operating budget of approximately $125 million. The branch comprised the Division of Public Health and Environmental Labo- ratories; the Division of Epidemiology, Occupational, and Environmental Health; the Division of Local Health Practice and Regional Systems Devel- opment; the Division of Health Emergency Preparedness and Response; and the Office of Animal Welfare. During his tenure Mr. Blumenstock also represented the department on a number of boards, councils, and commis- sions, including the New Jersey Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force. He received the ASTHO 2004 Noble J. Swearingen Award for excellence in public health administration and the Dennis J. Sullivan award, the highest honor bestowed by the New Jersey Public Health Association, for dedicated and outstanding service and contribution to the cause of public health. He is also a Year 14 scholar of the Public Health Leadership Institute, and he held an elected office serving his community for 12 years. Mr. Blumenstock received his B.S. in environmental science from Rutgers University in 1973 and his M.A. in health sciences administration from Jersey City State College in 1977. Daniel J. Bochicchio, M.D., FCCP, a decorated combat surgeon, currently serves as deputy chief surgeon on the Joint Staff of the National Guard Bureau

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT in Arlington, Virginia. For the Office of the Surgeon he addresses medical issues related to domestic disaster preparedness and the development and implementation of policies to ensure smooth integration of National Guard medical assets into civilian disaster response plans. Colonel Bochicchio’s role is to establish and mature strategic relationships with key Department of Defense (DoD) and federal civilian interagency partners to promote integra- tion and unity of effort as required by the National Response Framework. In 2005 Colonel Bochicchio was the Battalion Surgeon for Task Force 1-172 (Armored) Marine Division in Iraq, where he was responsible for the coordination and delivery of emergency and routine medical care to soldiers and Marines during combat operations in Al-Anbar Province, Iraq. From 2004 to 2005 he was responsible for planning and developing the National Guard domestic chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive (CBRNE) medical response as chief of Domestic Medical Operations for the National Guard Bureau. He was tasked with design and implementation of medical aspects of the National Guard CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package teams and Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD) Civil Support Teams. Colonel Bochicchio’s previous assignments have included chief of the Division Medical Operations Center, Headquarters, Division Support Command, 29th Infantry Division and commander of Company C, 229th Support Battalion, 29th Infantry Division. He is board certified in anesthe- siology and critical care medicine and is a former faculty member of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. John F. Brown, M.D., M.P.A., has served as the medical director for the San Francisco EMS Agency, Department of Public Health, since 1996. In his current position he has been responsible for the development and imple- mentation of local policies, procedures, and protocols for the pre-hospital emergency responders for the public safety agencies and private ambulance providers in San Francisco. He serves as the medical health operations area coordinator in the city’s disaster response structure, and he has been medi- cal advisor for the local Metropolitan Medical Response System program. He serves as a medical officer for the Disaster Medical Assistance Team CA-6 and is an assistant clinical professor in emergency medicine working at San Francisco General Hospital. Prior to his current position Dr. Brown served as the U.S. Navy Surgeon General’s Advisor for EMS and worked at the San Diego Naval Medical Center after the completion of his residency in emergency medicine there. He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in emergency medical services and earned an M.P.A. at the University of Arizona. His M.D. is from the University of Connecticut. Brooke Buddemeier, CHP, M.S., works for the Global Security Direc- torate of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory supporting risk

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 APPENDIX C and consequence management activities. He recently completed a 3.5-year assignment with the Department of Homeland Security as the weapons of mass destruction emergency response and consequence management program manager for the Science and Technology Directorate’s emergency preparedness and response portfolio. He supported the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Homeland Security Operations Center as a radiological emergency response subject matter expert. He also facilitated the department’s research, development, test, and evaluation process to improve emergency response through better capabilities, protocols, and standards. He is a certified health physicist who received his M.S. in radio- logical health physics from San Jose State University and his B.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Nelson J. Chao, M.D., M.B.A., is professor of medicine and immunology and the chief of the Division of Cellular Therapy/Bone Marrow Transplant at Duke University. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, his M.D. from Yale University, and his postgraduate training at Stanford University. He then joined the faculty at Stanford University. He was the associate director of Stem Cell Transplantation at Stanford Univer- sity prior to moving to Duke University in 1996 to be the program director of the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program. The program became a division within the Department of Medicine in 2000 and was renamed the Division of Cellular Therapy/BMT. Dr. Chao is also the codirector of the Clinical Stem Cell Transplantation Laboratory, and he continues to direct his own research laboratory focused on understanding and preventing graft- versus-host disease and improving immune reconstitution. He also directs the clinical research within the division. He obtained his M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University in 2000. He is the author of approximately 200 peer-reviewed papers, book chapters, and 1 book. He is also a cofounder of Aldagen, a start-up biotechnology company in Research Triangle Park. Cham Dallas, M.S., Ph.D., is professor and director of the Institute for Health Management and Mass Destruction Defense (IHMD) at the Uni- versity of Georgia, interim director of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the College of Public Health, and a member of the Depart- ment of Emergency Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia (MCG). He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Texas (UT) School of Public Health at Houston. For 7 years Dr. Dallas was the director of one of the largest university toxicology programs in the country, with 50 professors, at the University of Georgia. For 5 years he was the director of the Center for Mass Destruction Defense, a CDC Center for Public Health Preparedness dealing with mass casualty management. Dr. Dallas’s institute

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT has established a nationally successful collaboration with the American Med- ical Association (AMA), MCG, and UT for the development of the National Disaster Life Support (NDLS) family of courses. NDLS has been accepted as a national standard for WMDs training by the AMA and has been taught in 45 states to more than 60,000 health care personnel. Dr. Dallas and IHMD staff are currently conducting mass casualty evaluation exercises for Georgia hospitals as well as devising evacuation planning for special-needs populations. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards, includ- ing a university-wide award. He has written scores of research papers for the scientific community and educational articles for the public on the toxic components of WMDs. Dr. Dallas led a series of scientific expeditions to the most highly contaminated areas around Chernobyl and conducted research and teaching efforts there for more than 10 years, including at more than 40 institutions overseas. He has testified before the U.S. House and Senate Homeland Security hearings and at the United Nations three times on the topic of nuclear war medical response. Eric G. Daxon (Colonel-Retired, U.S. Army), Ph.D., CHP, is currently a senior research scientist with Battelle Memorial Institute. His current work centers on policy, doctrine, and plans for radiological or nuclear events for DoD clients. His current work at Battelle and the past 15 years of his 30-year military career have focused on the integration of radiation risk into decision making for the full range of military deployments. As the army’s medical lead for issues related to the use of depleted uranium munitions in combat, Dr. Daxon dealt directly with the issue of radiation risks and the risks of radiation exposure mitigation in emergency environ- ments. Prior assignments include director of the Proponency Office for Preventive Medicine at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine and the chair of the Radiation Biophysics Department at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Dr. Daxon has a Ph.D. in radiological hygiene from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.S. in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point. Craig DeAtley, PA-C., is currently the director of the Institute for Public Health Emergency Readiness at Washington Hospital Center, the District of Columbia’s largest hospital. Prior to taking this position he was an associate professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University, where he worked full-time for 28 years before leaving to start the institute. He also works as a physician assistant at Fairfax Hospital, a level 1 trauma center in Northern Virginia. In addition to being a physician assistant, he has been

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 APPENDIX C a volunteer paramedic with the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Depart- ment since 1972 and a member of their Urban Search and Rescue Team since 1991. He currently serves as the team’s medical team coordinator. Mr. DeAtley also serves as the assistant medical director for the Fairfax County Police Department. Those positions involve working with the special operations personnel (special weapons and tactics, civil disturbance, marine patrol, and helicopter operations) in those agencies. He has particular inter- est in hazardous material and WMD planning and response, and he was a founding member of NMRS-DC-1, the nation’s first U.S. Public Health Ser- vice trained-and-equipped civilian nuclear, biological, and chemical incident response team. For the past 11 years he has been working as a consultant on projects related to DoD/Department of Justice WMD Domestic Prepared- ness Programs and on a variety of HHS/CDC Public Health Department projects regarding preparedness and response. Each of these projects has led to him working with police, fire, EMS, hospitals, emergency management, and mental health and public health personnel to develop and exercise their hazardous material/chemical-biological response plans. Mr. DeAtley also worked for the HHS Office of Emergency Preparedness in developing and facilitating a new Public Health Emergency Practicum Program for medi- cal, emergency management, public health, and public safety personnel. His publications include recently serving as editor and contributing author for Jane’s Mass Casualty Handbook Pre-Hospital Care-Emergency Prepared- ness and Response. He served as the project manager to assist Arlington County, Virginia, in writing and exercising the Isolation and Quarantine Annex to its Emergency Operations Plan. More recently he served as the comanager of the HEICS IV project done on behalf of the California EMS. This project led to the recent release of the new Hospital Incident Command System. In addition, the project personnel also provided feedback to the National Incident Management System Integration Center on the system’s compliance activities for health care organizations. Sara D. DeCair, B.S., has been a health physicist with the Office of Radiation and Indoor Air at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since 2003. She works on policy, planning, training, and outreach for EPA’s radiological emergency preparedness and response program. She is the project and techni- cal lead for revising the Protective Action Guides and is especially interested in emergency worker dose limits and turnback levels. She previously worked for 7 years with the State of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality. Three of those years were spent in nuclear power plant emergency planning, and before that she was an inspector of radioactive materials registrants and a radiation incident responder. She is currently the affiliates director of the Baltimore-Washington chapter of the Health Physics Society.

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT Michael Fitton has served the City of New York as a paramedic for the past 24 years. He began his career in pre-hospital care receiving and dispatching 911 calls throughout the city. His years as a paramedic in the Bronx brought his future career goals into focus. He earned instructor certification and taught both basic life support and advanced life support programs. He went on through the ranks of lieutenant, captain, and deputy chief. In these years Chief Fitton was the commanding officer at EMS stations, a city- wide dispatch supervisor at the Fire Department of New York’s (FDNY’s) Emergency Medical Dispatch Center, has served as a deputy chief citywide, and currently is the division commander of the borough of the Bronx. He was selected to participate in the FDNY and U.S. Military Academy’s Joint Program for Combating Terrorism. Chief Fitton completed an intensive program at the Fire Officers Management Institute, a part of the Columbia University Graduate School Executive Development Program. He is cur- rently pursuing a professional studies degree in emergency management at Empire State College/State University of New York. H. keith Florig, Ph.D., is senior research engineer in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University, where he conducts research on public policy and communications issues involving health, safety, environment, and security risks. His work on the manage- ment and communication of radiation risks has been published in Science, Health Physics, Risk Analysis, and other journals. Dr. Florig has served on committees addressing radiation risks at both the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and the National Academy of Sciences. In recognition of his work on public involvement in radiation protection, he was selected to deliver the 2004 G. William Morgan Lecture of the Health Physics Society. Dr. Florig holds degrees in engineering and public policy (Ph.D.), nuclear science and engineering (M.S.), instrumenta- tion (M.S.), and physics (B.S.), all from Carnegie Mellon. Before joining the Carnegie Mellon faculty in 1996, he worked for 6 years in Washington, DC, at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and at Resources for the Future. Dan Hanfling, M.D., is the director of Emergency Management and Disaster Medicine for the Inova Health System in Falls Church, Virginia. He is also the state medical director for PHI Air Medical Group-Virginia, the largest private rotor-wing air medevac service in the Commonwealth of Virginia. He serves as a medical team manager for Virginia Task Force 1, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)- and U.S. Agency for International Development-sanctioned international urban search-and-rescue team, and he has been involved in the response to international and domestic disaster events, including the response to the Pentagon attack in September 2001

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 APPENDIX C and the response to Hurricanes Rita and Katrina in 2005. Dr. Hanfling was intimately involved in the response to the anthrax bioterror mailings in the fall of 2001, when two cases of inhalational anthrax were success- fully diagnosed at Inova Fairfax Hospital. He was a founding member and cochairman of the Northern Virginia Emergency Response Coalition and a founding member of the Northern Virginia Hospital Alliance. He has been appointed to the Virginia Secure Initiative Health and Medical Subpanel, the Virginia Department of Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Advisory Committee, and the Virginia Health and Hospitals Association Hospital Emergency Management Committee. Dr. Hanfling has testified before Congress on the issues of health care emergency management and disaster response. He lectures nationally and internationally on pre-hospital, hospital, and disaster-related subjects, and has coauthored numerous peer- reviewed articles on the subject of health care facility disaster preparedness. He received an A.B. in political science from Duke University and an M.D. from Brown University. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island, and an emergency medi- cine residency at George Washington/Georgetown University hospitals. He is a clinical professor of emergency medicine at George Washington University and an adjunct distinguished senior fellow at the George Mason University School of Public Policy. Bryan Hanley is the regional disaster medical and health specialist represent- ing the State of California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (OES) Mutual Aid Region One. OES Region One is home to nearly 14 million people living within Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo counties. Region One is a Tier 1 Urban Area Security Initiative area. Mr. Hanley is employed by the County of Los Angeles Emergency Medical Services Agency under contract with the State of California EMS Authority and California Department of Public Health. He works closely with county-level EMS agencies and public health departments in preparing their hospitals, fire service, EMS, law enforcement, and other medical and health partners to facilitate a coordinated response to natural or manmade disasters. Mr. Hanley also assists state agencies by facilitating integration of state priorities and projects into the local plans and efforts. During actual responses he coordinates information flow, requests for mutual aid, and reception of assistance into a disaster area as the director of the Medical and Health Branch of the Regional Emergency Operations Center (EOC). He serves as a member of various advisory groups locally and at the state level. Mr. Hanley has coordinated major response activities in his career, both at the field command level and within the command policy group in an EOC. He is a command staff member of the National Disaster Medical Assistance Team, California-1, based in Orange County. He has spent more than

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT 20 years in emergency management and is a trained and licensed paramedic, a former firefighter, and a hazardous materials technician. His educational background includes advanced degrees in health science and criminal justice- law enforcement. He has received training at the National Fire Academy and FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, Maryland. He has had the opportunity to teach at the university and community college level, and he lectures throughout the nation and internationally on various emergency management and terrorist threat topics. Jerome M. Hauer, M.P.H., one of the nation’s best-known names in emer- gency management and health and medical response to disasters, is now the chief executive officer of the Hauer Group. He served as the first assistant secretary (acting) of the Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness at HHS and was responsible for coordinating the country’s medical and public health preparedness in response to emergencies, including acts of biological, chemical, and nuclear terrorism. Before that Mr. Hauer was New York City’s first director of the Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management and was charged with coordinating the city’s planning for and response to natural and manmade events, including acts of terrorism. Prior to that he served as the executive director of the State of Indiana’s Emergency Management Agency as well as its Department of Fire and Buildings. He was on the Congressional Fire Caucus’s Urban Search and Rescue Advi- sory Committee as well as the National Institute for Urban Search and Rescue Advisory Council. Mr. Hauer served on the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Committee to Evaluate R&D Needs for Improved Civilian Medi- cal Response to Chemical or Biological Terrorism Incidents, as consulting fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies’ Center for Emerging Threat and Opportunities and at the Board of Visitors of the National Interagency Civil-Military Institute, and as an advisor to the U.S. Capitol Police and the U.S. Marine Corps’ Chemical-Biological Incident Response Force. He served on the faculty of the Northeastern University Paramedic Program, and he codirected the first two postgraduate courses in trauma management at the Longwood Area Trauma Center of the Harvard Medi- cal School. Mr. Hauer was a captain in the U.S. Army Reserve attached to the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, DC. He has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and a bachelor’s degree from New York University. Douglas Havron, RN, B.S.N., M.S., CEN, CEM, is the administrative director for the Southeast Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council and the Regional Hospital Preparedness Council. His responsibilities include the administrative leadership of the Hospital Preparedness Program for the Houston Metro area and surrounding counties. His experience includes

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 APPENDIX C EMS, inner-city Level 1 trauma center management, hospital administra- tion, and regional hospital preparedness leadership. He has more than 15 years of experience in disaster preparedness and response, and he served as one of Houston’s medical operations chiefs for the Catastrophic Medical Operations Center during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He has a B.S.N. from the University of Texas–El Paso and an M.S. in emergency manage- ment from Touro University. Patricia Hawes, RN, B.S.N., COHN, is the emergency manager for Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, where she has helped lead the hospital to be named one of the top five most highly prepared trauma hospitals in the nation by the National Foundation for Trauma Care in conjunction with CDC. She is on the leadership board of the Bethesda Hospital’s Emergency Preparedness Partnership, which is composed of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, the National Naval Medical Center, the National Library of Medicine, and Suburban Hospital. Ms. Hawes is the vice chair of the National Capital Region-Health and Medical Programmatic work- group, where she represents the interests of Maryland hospitals. Ms. Hawes was also a contributing author of the National Capital Regional Surge Plan. She designs and participates in a yearly regional collaborative multi- agency exercise that tests hospital surge preparedness. Ms. Hawes is a registered nurse with more than 20 years experience in trauma care and cardiothoracic intensive care and is certified in occupational health, having obtained her B.S.N. from Jacksonville University. Nathaniel Hupert, M.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor of public health at Cornell University’s Weill Medical College, an associate attending phy- sician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, and the director of the new Preparedness Modeling Initiative for CDC. Since 2000 he has led a number of federally funded projects to develop improved tools and logistics for mass prophylaxis, bioterrorism response, and health system preparedness for surge capacity. His research team’s models are available on the websites of HHS and the American Hospital Association, and they are used by states across the United States for preparedness planning. One of three academic researchers to serve on the Anthrax Modeling Working Group of the HHS Secretary’s Council on Public Health Emergency Preparedness, he has lec- tured and given satellite and web broadcasts for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and CDC on mass prophylaxis and the physician’s role in bioterrorism response. Dr. Hupert is codirector of Cornell’s Institute for Disease and Disaster Preparedness, whose mission is to advance the field of computational public health by applying engineering approaches to a range of public health response logistics problems ranging from U.S.

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0 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT emergency preparedness to scale-up of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome treatment in sub-Saharan Africa. Amy Hideko kaji, M.D., Ph.D., is board certified in emergency medicine and acts as the medical director for the Harbor-UCLA South Bay Disaster Resource Center. She performed a disaster medicine and research fellowship at the UCLA School of Public Health, where she obtained both an M.P.H. and a Ph.D. in epidemiology. The focus of her dissertation was the assess- ment of hospital disaster preparedness and surge capacity in Los Angeles County. As such, she is knowledgeable about the management of mass casualty incidents and disaster response. As the medical director of 1 of 13 regional centers of excellence in disaster preparedness in Los Angeles County, she is actively engaged in coordinating disaster drills and classes as well as in stockpiling pharmaceuticals and supplies. She is also an assistant clinical professor of medicine in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Ann R. knebel (Captain, U.S. Public Health Service), RN, D.N.Sc., FAAN, is a registered nurse with a D.N.Sc. in pulmonary critical care. For the past 16 years she has served as an officer in the Public Health Service Commis- sioned Corps. Currently she is deputy director for preparedness planning with HHS in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR). In this capacity, she is responsible for the develop- ment of programs to enhance preparedness integration across the local/ state/regional and federal tiers of response. In the 6 years Dr. Knebel has worked for ASPR (formerly the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Health and Emergency Preparedness [OPHEP]), she has been instrumental in advancing various preparedness planning and surge capacity initiatives. Highlights include assisting the Greek Ministry of Health to prepare for the 2004 Summer Olympics and a 9-month detail with the New York City Office of Emergency Management to develop bioterrorism plans. During the response to the 2005 and 2008 hurricane seasons, Dr. Knebel worked as the plans section chief on the HHS Emergency Management Team, helping to plan the federal public health and medical response and recovery. Prior to joining ASPR, Dr. Knebel served in both the intramural and extramural programs at the National Institutes of Health. She is a fellow of the Ameri- can Academy of Nursing. kathleen “Cass” kaufman has been the director of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s radiation management program since 1990. Radiation management staff inspect all users of X-ray machines or radio- active materials to ensure compliance with California and federal laws and regulations, and they respond to radiation emergencies. Los Angeles County

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 APPENDIX C has been proactive in preparing to respond to a deliberate radiation event by providing training to fire departments, hospitals, and law enforcement and by acquiring specialized equipment to detect, assess, and respond to an event. In addition to programmatic leadership, Ms. Kaufman has direct experience in responding to radiation emergencies. Ms. Kaufman has served on many national committees and is on the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors’ Committee that wrote the Handbook for Responding to a Radiological Dispersal Device. She currently serves on the National Coun- cil on Radiation Protection committee that is writing a report to address key decisions that decision makers will need to make after a radiologic or nuclear event. Ms. Kaufman has a degree in radiological sciences from George Washington University in Washington, DC, and has taken numerous courses and participated in many exercises over the course of her career. Carl E. Lindgren, NREMT-P, is a 28-year veteran of the Arlington County Fire Department in Virginia. He currently holds the rank of fire/EMS battalion chief with overall responsibility for EMS in North Arlington. Mr. Lindgren was part of the inaugural National Medical Response Team (NMRT) that later became the DC-NMRT. The majority of Mr. Lindgren’s career was spent as a field EMS supervisor. During the 9/11 attack of the Pentagon (located in Arlington), Mr. Lindgren served as the treatment unit leader the day of the attack. After 9/11, Mr. Lindgren was assigned to be one of two operations training officers with a strong focus on EMS during a WMD event. His next assignment, in 2002, was to the county’s newly expanded Office of Emergency Management. He was responsible for instructing county staff on the new emergency operations plan, along with responsibility for the county’s Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program. Participants included the Pentagon and United States Northern Command as well as the county’s partners across the National Capital Region, with a focus on exercising, developing, and evaluating the region’s capabilities. He was part of two Emergency Management Assistance Com- pact EOC deployments, one to Hurricane Charlie in Charlotte, Florida, and the second as the first EOC team to assemble and begin EOC operations in the city of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, for which he served as the Emergency Services Branch director. Mr. Lindgren has spoken on EMS, WMDs, public health, and emergency management across the globe. He received his AAS in emergency medicine in 1980 from Northern Virginia Community College as one of the early nationally registered paramedics in the state of Virginia. Jill A. Lipoti, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. in environmental science from Rutgers University. She is the director of the Division of Environmental Safety and Health in the New Jersey Department of Environmental Pro-

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT tection. She has responsibility for radiation protection, chemical release prevention, lab certification and quality assurance, pollution prevention, and right to know. Dr. Lipoti served as a member of the board of direc- tors and as chairperson for the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD). In 2000 she received the Gerald S. Parker Award of Merit, CRCPD’s highest award. She served as chair of the Radiation Advi- sory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Science Advisory Board (SAB) and serves on its executive committee. Dr. Lipoti has served on the Food and Drug Administration’s Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee. She was elected to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement in 2002, where she has served on the board of directors and the budget and finance committee. Currently, she is a member of the Advisory Panel on Public Policy and Scientific Committee 6-2, Radiation Exposure of the U.S. Popu- lation. Dr. Lipoti participated in the Improvised Nuclear Device Exercise conducted in New Jersey in November 2007. John Mackinney, M.S., M.P.H., is a senior policy advisor and deputy direc- tor for nuclear and radiological policy in the Department of Homeland Security, where he coordinates interdepartmental and interagency programs and policies in radiological and nuclear terrorism prevention and response. Mr. MacKinney has 20 years of experience in radiation science and policy in areas including nuclear facility decommissioning, radiological risk assess- ment, standards and regulations, research and development, and nuclear/ radiological homeland security science and policy. He previously worked at EPA’s National Homeland Security Research Center, where he led a team of researchers investigating scientific solutions for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and IND attack response and recovery. Mr. MacKinney has served as an expert consultant to the World Bank on environmental radiological issues and on a number of senior-level White House work- ing groups, including the Homeland Security Council (HSC) Scenarios Writing Group, the National Security Council/HSC Counterproliferation Technology Coordination Committee, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) RDD/IND Working Group, and the OSTP Nuclear Defense Research and Development/Response and Recovery Working Group. He holds a B.S. in geology from Wheaton College (Wheaton, Illinois), an M.S. in geophysics from the University of Wisconsin, and an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Mr. MacKinney is certi- fied in risk assessment and risk policy through the Risk Sciences and Public Policy Institute. His current interests are science, technology, programs and policy for nuclear and radiological terrorism prevention, and consequences management.

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 APPENDIX C Carmen T. Maher (Commander, U.S. Public Health Service), B.S.N., M.A., RN, RAC, is a senior nurse officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Com- missioned Corps and currently serves as a regulatory policy analyst in the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats in the Office of the Commissioner. Commander Maher collaborates with senior agency staff in developing and updating agency and interagency counterterrorism and chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear consequence management and mitigation policies and plans. Prior to joining FDA, Commander Maher was assigned to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, as a lead regulatory officer for pre-clinical and early clinical devel- opment of vaccines and therapeutics to prevent or treat illnesses caused by smallpox, anthrax, and influenza disease agents. As a federal first responder, Commander Maher has assisted state and local response efforts and was an active member of the PHS-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team, serving on its leadership cadre for 2 years. Commander Maher earned her M.A. in national security and strategic studies with highest distinction from the U.S. Naval War College, Rhode Island. She earned her B.S.N. and her associate degree in life sciences from the University of Puerto Rico. She holds a Regu- latory Affairs Certification in U.S. health care products regulations. John Mercier (Colonel, U.S. Army), Ph.D., PE, DABR, is the lead DoD subject matter expert for nuclear weapons effects on humans. His current work includes mass casualty care and protective actions following an urban nuclear detonation. He currently serves at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute as institute nuclear consultant and director emeritus of the Military Medical Operations Directorate, with oversight of the Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation Course, the Medical Radiobiology Advisory Team, and radiological safety operations for institute nuclear and radiation facilities. Previous duties have included serving as radiological consultant to the Multinational Corps-Iraq, NATO senior umpire for the Sampling and Identification of Radiological Agents, leader of the U.S. Army Radiological Advisory Medical Team, chief of Health Physics at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and chairman of DoD’s Nuclear Weapons Effects Human Response Panel. Colonel Mercier is a licensed nuclear engineer, nuclear plant senior reactor operator, and medical physicist. He is also board certi- fied in diagnostic radiological physics and medical nuclear physics. Colonel Mercier has nearly 30 years of military service, he holds a Bronze Star from his combat tour with the XVIII Airborne Corps, and his military retirement has been approved for 2009. Joseph S. Newton is the recipient of the 2006 Medal of Valor for the State of Illinois and is a decorated firefighter/paramedic who works for the Chicago

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT Fire Department and neighboring suburb of Westmont, Illinois. His edu- cational background includes Illinois State Paramedic, Firefighter II, Fire- fighter III, Hazmat Operations including Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations training, EMT Lead Instructor, Fire/EMS Instructor I, and Instructor II, among other various certificates and training, such as emergency response to terrorism, rescue dive, advanced cardiac life support, pediatric education for prehospital professionals, and international trauma life support. In his duties with the Chicago Fire Department, Mr. Newton is a paramedic assigned to the Operations Division, and he is currently detailed to Fire Academy South/EMS Training where, as an instructor, he has held a direct supervisory role in the training of all new fire and EMS hires for the past 4 years. He is also a field training officer responsible for District 1 Operations, consisting of approximately 1,000 department mem- bers. District 1 encompasses the downtown metropolitan area of Chicago, including 22 engine companies, 11 truck companies, 1 squad company, Air Sea Rescue, 13 ambulance companies (3 BLS, 10 ALS), Hazardous Materials Team 511, Fire Prevention Bureau, Training Division, Headquarters, Air Mask (Support Services), Special Events Response Teams, Public Education, Internal Affairs, and the Photo Unit. Mr. Newton has trained to work as a liaison for the Chicago Fire Department Tactical Operations Intelligence Center and has had hands-on experience as a member of small special operations disaster deployment teams consisting of 30 members. He has also been tasked with the management and deployment of on-scene field resources for large-scale special events, ranging from 20,000 to 1.2 million civilian participants, held inside and outside of the City of Chicago. Ann E. Norwood (Colonel-Retired, U.S. Army), M.D., is senior associate at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Center for Biosecurity in Baltimore, Maryland. She received her A.B. in psychobiology from Vassar College and her M.D. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Norwood completed her resi- dency in psychiatry at Letterman Army Medical Center in San Francisco, California. She was the chief of psychiatry at Darnall Army Community Hospital, Ft. Hood, Texas, before her appointment as an assistant profes- sor at USUHS in 1988. Dr. Norwood held a number of positions while at USUHS, including associate chair and a 6-month term as acting chair of the Department of Psychiatry. In 2003 she was assigned to Walter Reed Army Medical Center with duty at HHS as a senior advisor on risk com- munication to OPHEP. Dr. Norwood retired from the Army Medical Corps as a colonel and joined HHS as a civilian in 2004. Her final position in the former OPHEP (now ASPR) was as a senior policy analyst in the Office of Preparedness and Emergency Operations/Office of Preparedness Planning. Dr. Norwood is a former chair of the American Psychiatric Association’s

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 APPENDIX C Committee on Psychiatric Dimensions of Disaster. She is an associate edi- tor of the peer-reviewed journal Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science. She has coedited four books and published numerous articles and chapters on the behavioral health aspects of trauma associated with war, terrorism, and disasters, as well as the unique stresses associated with military service. Her other professional interests include crisis communication, resilience, and mass fatality management. Jeanine Prud’homme is a certified industrial hygienist who serves as the assistant commissioner for the New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Bureau of Environmental Emergency Pre- paredness and Response (BEEPR) and who has overseen the agency’s Office of Radiological Health. With the NYC Fire Department, Ms. Prud’homme serves as the cochair of the NYC Police Department’s Securing the Cities Radiological Response and Recovery Subcommittee. BEEPR’s responsibili- ties include all hazards field and technical planning and response to envi- ronmental public health incidents. Within the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, she plays a major role in the planning and mitigation of biological and radiological incidents in NYC. Irwin Redlener, M.D., FAAP, is associate dean, professor of clinical pub- lic health, and director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University. Dr. Redlener speaks and writes extensively on national disaster preparedness policies, pandemic influenza, the threat of terrorism in the United States, and related issues. He is also president and cofounder of the Children’s Health Fund and has expertise in health care systems, crisis response, and public policy with respect to access to health care for underserved populations. Dr. Redlener, a pediatrician, has worked extensively in the Gulf region following Hurricane Katrina, where he helped establish ongoing medical and public health programs. He also organized medical response teams in the immediate aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks of 9/11 and has had disaster management leadership experi- ence internationally and nationally. Dr. Redlener is the author of Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisasters and What We Can Do Now, published in August 2006. Dori B. Reissman (Captain, U.S. Public Health Service), M.D., M.P.H., has been providing leadership and vision to integrate health, safety, and resiliency into incident management strategies for emergency responders and address organizational dynamics affecting traumatic stress for work- ers in hazardous occupations. Contributions include emergency response service, expert consultation, applied behavioral research, and policy guid- ance. She initiated efforts to address community resiliency as a public health

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT protection strategy as well as to address organizational and workforce resilience at CDC, and she has supported numerous public health missions in response to natural disasters and terrorist attacks. She was commis- sioned as a medical officer in the Public Health Service in 1997, when she joined CDC as an epidemic intelligence officer. Dr. Reissman completed residency training in occupational and environmental medicine in 1997, including an M.P.H. at the University of Illinois. Previously, she had com- pleted residency training in psychiatry and provided psychiatric consulta- tion services in private and faculty-based practices in addition to teaching and supervisory positions in university-affiliated hospitals. Dr. Reissman was chief of the emergency psychiatric services at St. Vincent’s Hospital and Medical Center of New York when the 1993 World Trade Center bomb- ing incident occurred. She received a medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, in 1984. Prior to her medical training, Dr. Reissman obtained a B.S. in environmental sciences from Cook College, Rutgers University, in New Jersey, and an M.A. in pharmacology and toxi- cology from Columbia University in New York. Alan L. Remick is the consequence management program manager for the Office of Emergency Response, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Mr. Remick has more than 25 years of technical and program management experience in emergency response. Prior to working for the Department of Energy (DOE) NNSA, he managed the nuclear emergency monitoring and assessment program at Mare Island Naval Shipyard. At DOE/NNSA, he manages the Consequence Management Program, which provides expert technical advice and assistance from the DOE/NNSA complex in response to radiological accidents, lost or stolen radioactive materials, and acts of nuclear terrorism. He received a B.S. in nuclear engi- neering from Kansas State University. Adela Salame-Alfie, Ph.D., is the assistant director of the Division of Environmental Health Investigation in the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). Prior to that appointment she was the direc- tor of the Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection at NYSDOH. Dr. Salame-Alfie is the current chair-elect of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. She is also chair of the Homeland Security Emergency Response 2 Committee that was responsible for the preparation of the Handbook for Responding to a Radiological Dispersal Device—The First  Hours. Dr. Salame-Alfie is a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements’ (NCRP’s) Scientific Committee SC4-2, “Population Monitoring and Decontamination Following a Nuclear or Radiological Incident,” and is also a member of the American Society for Testing and Materials’ E54.2 committee that developed the Standard

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 APPENDIX C Practice for Radiological Emergency Response. Dr. Salame-Alfie received her M.S. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Aashish Shah, M.D., J.D., FACOG, is the regional medical director for Health Service Region 6/5S in the greater Houston, TX, area. Formerly, he served as the senior policy advisor for health and medical preparedness for the Texas Department of State Health Services, where his responsibilities included the evaluation and development of health and medical prepared- ness policy for the department. In addition, he is the associate director of public health preparedness at the University of Texas School of Public Health Center for Biosecurity and Public Health Preparedness. He previ- ously served as the chief physician for public health preparedness at the City of Houston Department of Health and Human Services. As a board- certified obstetrician-gynecologist and a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Dr. Shah has had experience in both private and public health sectors. He began his career in private practice in League City, Texas. He then worked at the University of Texas Medical Branch Women’s HealthCare Group and was a clinical assistant professor. Dr. Shah completed his B.A. in biology from the University of Texas in Austin, his M.D. from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, and his residency in obstetrics, gynecology, and infertility at the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston. He recently graduated from the University of Houston Law Center with an emphasis in health policy, where he authored HIPAA and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: A Primer for Disclosure of Protected Health Information to the local Pub- lic Health Authority. Dr. Shah has had experience working with the state legislature. As a legislative intern with the Texas Medical Association, he worked with the House Subcommittee on Public Health to establish the Council on Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke. katherine Uraneck, M.D., is the senior medical coordinator for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in the Healthcare Emergency Preparedness Program. Her primary focus areas include radi- ation incident planning and response, hospital surge capacity, pediatric preparedness, and mass fatality planning. She has been project manager, coauthor, and editor of NYC Hospital Guidelines for Responding to a Contaminating Radiation Incident as well as an active participant in the New York City Securing the City subcommittee on the city’s response to a radiation incident. Nationally Dr. Uraneck has participated in the Center for Biosecurity’s Working Group on Emergency Mass Critical Care, the CDC Working Group on Radiation Population Monitoring, and the NCRP Scientific Committee 4-2, “Population Monitoring and Decontamination

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT Following a Nuclear or Radiological Incident.” Dr. Uraneck is a board- certified and residency-trained emergency physician. She completed her undergraduate degree in biomechanical engineering at Cornell University, her M.D. at Washington University Medical School in St. Louis, Missouri, and her residency and fellowship in emergency medicine at the Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She practiced as an emergency physician in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; in Albany, New York; and in rural Vermont. In 2002, Dr. Uraneck completed a master’s degree in journalism at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Reuben k. Varghese, M.D., M.P.H., promotes disease control and pre- vention and overall community health as chief of the Public Health Divi- sion of Arlington County, Virginia. Varghese began his career at a health maintenance organization, where he served as internist. He served as chief of the Medical Affairs and Surveillance Branch of the Food Safety and Inspection Service at the Department of Agriculture (USDA) from 2004 to 2005. From 2000 to 2002 he was an epidemic intelligence service officer for CDC. While at CDC, he was part of a team sent to New York City to monitor latent health effects caused by 9/11—an asset to a community such as Arlington, which also was directly affected on 9/11. Prior to his work at USDA, Dr. Varghese was director of the Three Rivers Health District based in Middlesex County, Virginia, from 2002 to 2004. He received his M.D. from Brown University and has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Michael Welling has served as the director of the Virginia Radioactive Materials Program (RMP) for 2 years. RMP was created in order for Virginia to become an agreement state and regulate all radioactive material in the commonwealth. Prior to this, Mr. Welling worked for the Wisconsin Radioactive Materials Program for 5 years. Mr. Welling was a nuclear elec- trician in the U.S. Navy for 6 years. He has a B.A. in business management from Lakeland College in Wisconsin. Albert L. Wiley, Jr. (United States Navy Reserve-Retired), M.D., Ph.D., FACR, received Board of Nuclear Engineering and postgraduate training in nuclear engineering from North Carolina State University and worked as a nuclear engineer. He later graduated from medical school at the Uni- versity of Rochester, followed by an internship in surgery/medicine at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville and residency training in radiation oncology and nuclear medicine at Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He also received a Ph.D. (major in radiobiology, minor in nuclear engineering) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In the U.S. Navy, Dr. Wiley served in the United States and Europe as senior

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 APPENDIX C medical officer for a major Navy Radiation Accident Response Team; as medical director of the U.S. Navy Radiological Defense Laboratory, San Francisco; and as instructor at the Navy Nuclear Training Center, Naval Air Station North Island, Coronado, California. For most of his career, he was a professor of radiation oncology and human oncology at the Univer- sity of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is currently emeritus professor. He is also part-time clinical professor of radiation oncology at East Carolina University. Dr. Wiley is currently the director of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center at Oak Ridge, as well as vice president of Radiation Emergency Medicine at Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He is board certified in radiation oncology (ABR), nuclear medicine (ABNM), medical physics (ABMP, medical health physics), and by ABSNM (radiation protection). He has served nationally and internation- ally as a consultant to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Energy, Department of State, Department of Veterans’ Affairs, HHS, WHO, and International Atomic Energy Agency. Richard P. Zuley recently retired from the Chicago Police Department after almost 37 years of service. During the last 1.5 years of his police career, Detective Zuley was detailed to the Training Academy, where he became a state-certified instructor and served as the senior instructor and one of the developers of Chicago’s highly regarded Terrorism Awareness and Response Academy. Following his retirement, Mr. Zuley was hired by the City of Chicago Department of Public Health, where he works as the senior emergency management coordinator in the Emergency Preparedness and Response Division. Mr. Zuley’s duties include developing prepared- ness and response plans, in addition to being the primary CBRNE officer and the development of an indigenous intelligence fusion section. Earlier in his career Mr. Zuley was a Marine and still serves as an intelligence officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve. Commander Zuley has had extensive active-duty time including 2 years deployed overseas as part of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. He was closely involved in the actual intelligence collection mission and served in a leadership position in that effort. Mr. Zuley received two Defense Meritorious Service medals for his efforts in those operations. In addition to his work with the Chicago Police Department, Mr. Zuley continues to teach terrorism-related classes through the Chicago Department of Public Health, Department of Home- land Security, and multiple state agencies. He is a licensed pilot and a gradu- ate of Dominican University with a degree in political science and history, and he also did graduate studies at National-Lewis University.