Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Consultant, and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Georges C. Benjamin, M.D. (Chair), became executive director of the American Public Health Association, the nation’s oldest and largest organization of public health professionals, in 2002. Prior to that he was secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing Maryland’s bioterrorism plan, following 4 years as the department’s deputy secretary for public health services. Dr. Benjamin started his medical career in 1981 in Tacoma, Washington, where he managed a 72,000-patient-visit ambulatory care service as chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at the Madigan Army Medical Center. A few years later, he served as chief of emergency medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. After leaving the Army, he chaired the Department of Community Health and Ambulatory Care at the District of Columbia General Hospital. He was promoted to acting commissioner for Public Health for the District of Columbia and later directed one of the busiest ambulance services in the nation as interim director of the Emergency Ambulance Bureau of the District of Columbia Fire Department. Dr. Benjamin is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. He has served on several other IOM and IOM/National Research Council committees: training physicians for public health careers; measures to enhance the effectiveness of the CDC quarantine station expansion plan for U.S. ports of entry; evaluation of the metropolitan medical response systems program; and research and development needs for improved civilian medical response to chemical or biological terrorism incidents. He also



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Consultant, and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Georges C. Benjamin, M.D. (Chair), became executive director of the American Public Health Association, the nation’s oldest and largest organi- zation of public health professionals, in 2002. Prior to that he was secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing Maryland’s bioterrorism plan, following 4 years as the department’s deputy secretary for public health services. Dr. Benjamin started his medical career in 1981 in Tacoma, Washington, where he managed a 72,000-patient-visit ambulatory care service as chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at the Madigan Army Medical Center. A few years later, he served as chief of emergency medicine at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. After leaving the Army, he chaired the Department of Com- munity Health and Ambulatory Care at the District of Columbia General Hospital. He was promoted to acting commissioner for Public Health for the District of Columbia and later directed one of the busiest ambulance services in the nation as interim director of the Emergency Ambulance Bureau of the District of Columbia Fire Department. Dr. Benjamin is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. He has served on several other IOM and IOM/National Research Council committees: training physicians for public health careers; measures to enhance the effectiveness of the CDC quarantine station expansion plan for U.S. ports of entry; evaluation of the metropolitan medical response systems program; and research and development needs for improved civil- ian medical response to chemical or biological terrorism incidents. He also 0

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 APPENDIX D serves on the boards of Partnership for Prevention and the Regan Udall Foundation. Dr. Benjamin is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technol- ogy and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a fellow emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is an IOM member. George J. Annas, J.D., M.P.H., is the Edward R. Utley Professor and chair of the Department of Health Law, Bioethics and Human Rights, at the Boston University School of Public Health and professor at the Boston University School of Medicine and School of Law. He is the cofounder of Global Lawyers and Physicians, a nongovernmental organization dedicated to promoting health and human rights. Dr. Annas is an expert on health law, bioethics, and international human rights, is the author or editor of 17 books, including The Rights of Patients, American Bioethics, Some Choice, and Standard of Care, and writes a regular feature, “Health Law, Ethics, and Human Rights,” for the New England Journal of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a mem- ber of the National Academies’ Committee on Human Rights, and cochair of the American Bar Association’s Bioethics and Health Rights Committee (Individual Rights and Responsibilities Section). Dr. Annas holds degrees in economics (A.B.), public health (M.P.H.), and law (J.D.) from Harvard University. He is an IOM member. Donna F. Barbisch (Major General Retired), C.R.N.A., M.P.H., D.H.A., is among the nation’s most distinguished experts on terrorism, disaster preparedness, and national and international security interoperability. She is president of Global Deterrence Alternatives, LLC, and director of the Institute for Global and Regional Readiness. With more than 20 years of experience in managing complex private and public medical and organi- zational challenges, she addresses the complexities of combating terrorism through comprehensive planning and culture change. She provides vision- ary policy and program integrating solutions related to the national security threats of terrorism, natural disasters, and emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Barbisch focuses on strategic planning for reducing threats and respond- ing to crises with multilevel and multijurisdictional elements. She develops and implements holistic management programs that promote interoper- ability across civilian and military organizations as well as political and business environments that result in strategic partnerships. Major General Barbisch served in a multitude of active and reserve military assignments, from Vietnam to the Pentagon. Her final military assignment was as direc- tor of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Program Integration for the Office of the Secretary of Defense. She has a bachelors degree from

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT California University of Pennsylvania, an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a D.H.A. in health administration from the Medical University of South Carolina. Frederick M. Burkle, Jr., M.D., M.P.H., D.T.M., is actively involved in research, policy issues, and writing in a number of areas, including globaliza- tion and health; globalization and disaster management; global/international health as it pertains to war, conflict, recovery and rehabilitation, refugee care, and vulnerable populations; pandemics/epidemics; primarily population- based care and triage management; civil-military cooperation and collabo- ration; tropical medicine and bioterrorism; United Nations reform; and the United Nations (UN)/World Health Organization (WHO)/United Nations Childrens’ Fund response and international health regulations in global health crises. A retired professor from the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, he is currently a Woodrow Wilson International Scholar and senior fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard Uni- versity, and associate scientist, Johns Hopkins University Medical Institu- tions. He is a retired Naval Reserve Captain and former deputy assistant administrator, Bureau of Global Health, U.S. Agency for International Devel- opment. He received his M.D. from the University of Vermont College of Medicine; his M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley; a diploma in health emergencies in large populations from the University of Geneva; and a diploma in tropical medicine from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin. He is qualified in emergency medicine, pediatric emergency medi- cine, pediatrics, and psychiatry. Dr. Burkle is an IOM member. Colleen Conway-Welch, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, FACNM, has served as pro- fessor and dean of the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing since 1984. She has been active in nursing practice and nursing education for more than four decades. The holder of three honorary doctorates from Cumberland University, Georgetown University, and the University of Colorado, she is a graduate of Georgetown University, Catholic University of America, and New York University. She has published extensively, served on President Reagan’s Commission on the HIV Epidemic in 1988, the National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare in 1998, and the Governor’s Tennessee Commission on the Future of TennCare, and was appointed by Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson to the Secretary’s Council on Public Health Preparedness, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Health Emergency Prepared- ness. She is also a member of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and a member of the George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute. She was named by President Bush and confirmed by the U.S. Senate in

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 APPENDIX D 2006 as a member of the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. In 2007, she was appointed by Secretary Leavitt of HHS to the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She is a former president, and one of the founders, of Friends of the National Institutes of Health, National Insti- tute for Nursing Research. She is an invited member of the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination and member of the Board of Com- missioners of the Tennessee Safety Seismic Commission panel of advisors. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, a charter fellow of the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and serves as a director on the boards of Pinnacle Bank, RehabCare Group, and Ardent Health Ser- vices, in addition to numerous other 501(c)3 boards, such as the Health Care Leadership Council in Washington, DC. She is also the founding director of the Nursing Emergency Preparedness Education Coalition. Dr. Conway-Welch is an IOM member. Daniel F. Flynn, M.D., is a board-certified radiation oncology physician on staff at Caritas Holy Family Hospital and Medical Center in Methuen, Massachusetts. He is an active lecturer on the visiting faculty at the Radiation Assistance Center and Training Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He serves as the medical consultant to the state of Massachusetts on its nuclear incident advi- sory team. As a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserves Medical Corps, he has been an invited contributor to the armed services training manuals on the subject of the medical management of mass casualties from a nuclear event, and he has been an invited lecturer at the Armed Forces Radiobiological Research Insti- tute. He also has been both triage officer and deputy commander of a combat support hospital and is a 2007 Iraq War veteran. Dr. Flynn received his M.S. in medical radiation physics from the Harvard School of Public Health and his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College, and he did postgraduate training at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he later served on the staff with an academic appointment to Harvard Medical School. Richard J. Hatchett, M.D., joined the Office of the Director at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in July 2005, where he became associate director for Radiation Countermeasures Research and Emergency Preparedness in the Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Trans- plantation. In late 2005 and early 2006 he served on the White House Homeland Security Council as Director for Biodefense Policy. Prior to joining NIAID, he served as senior medical adviser in the HHS Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness. He received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University and completed postgraduate training in internal medi- cine at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York and in medical oncology at the Duke University Medical Center.

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT Fred A. Mettler, Jr., M.D., is chief of radiology and nuclear medicine at the New Mexico VA Health Care System and is a professor at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center in Albuquerque. His area of expertise is the medical effects of ionizing radiation. He is the U.S. representative to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, an emeritus commissioner of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Mettler has served as a consultant to WHO and the International Atomic Energy Agency. He was the Health Effects Team Leader for the International Chernobyl Project and is an academician of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Judith A. Monroe, M.D., was appointed in March 2005 by Governor Mitch Daniels as the Indiana State Health Commissioner and medical director of Medicaid. She is president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) and served as the chair of the ASTHO Prepared- ness Policy Committee. During her tenure as health commissioner she has played a key role in improving public health preparedness in Indiana, and in December 2006 she traveled to Israel with a delegation from ASTHO for preparedness training. She is chair of the executive board of the Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Agency and is a member of the Public Health Accreditation Board and the Indiana Health Information Exchange. Dr. Monroe is a family physician and National Health Service Corps scholar. She started her career in 1986 providing health care in rural Appalachia, during which time she was featured with former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop in a documentary on the heath care crisis in America. In 1990 she joined the faculty of the Indiana University School of Medicine and served as clinical director with the Department of Family Medicine. In 1992 she joined the medical staff of St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis and became the director of the Family Medicine Residency Program and Primary Care Center. In this role she oversaw multidisciplinary ambulatory services with more than 50,000 visits per year. Dr. Monroe received her undergraduate degree from Eastern Kentucky University and is a graduate of the Univer- sity of Maryland School of Medicine. She did her postgraduate training at the University of Cincinnati and is a fellow of the American Academy of Family Practice. Paul E. Pepe, M.D., M.P.H., oversees one of the nation’s largest academic emergency departments (55 faculty, 70 residents and fellows) at the extremely busy county (public) emergency-trauma center (Parkland Hospital) and the North Texas Poison Control Center. He is also the director of medical emergency services for public safety, public health, and homeland security in the Office of the City Manager for the City of Dallas and the jurisdictional

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 APPENDIX D medical director for the regional BioTel System (a centralized emergency medical services program that includes more than 3,000 firefighters, emer- gency medical technicians, and paramedics from the fire departments for the City of Dallas and 16 surrounding cities). He also provides medical direc- tion for the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas Metropolitan Medi- cal Response System for counterterrorism. In addition to a distinguished, productive career in academic medicine (with nearly 500 published scientific papers and abstracts including multiple landmark publications in multiple disciplines), Dr. Pepe has simultaneously served as a high-level municipal or state employee for a quarter century, managing large public budgets but doing so in an in-the-trenches, “street-wise” manner. He is renowned for a grassroots approach to planning, implementing, and overseeing a systems approach to saving lives, both operationally and through clinical trials. His programs have resulted in some of the highest reported cardiac-arrest and trauma survival rates among all large U.S. metropolitan cities. He was a senior author on the original American Heart Association Chain of Survival publication (1991), a reference now cited symbolically in nearly every CPR- related publication and training course worldwide, and he has served for many years as emergency medicine and trauma consultant for the U.S. Secret Service, the White House Medical Unit, the National Institutes of Health, and network news organizations. Thomas M. Seed, Ph.D., is currently a consultant in the general area of radiation medical countermeasures, having retired at the end of 2007 as the associate director of research of the Radiation Effects Research Founda- tion (RERF) in Hiroshima, Japan. Prior to the RERF appointment, he held the following professional appointments: research professor/senior scien- tist, Radiation Biophysics/Vitreous State Laboratory, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (2003-2005); group leader/senior scientist, radiation medical countermeasures, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (1996-2003); research scientist/group leader, radiation hematology, Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (1975-1995); and assistant scientist/ department chairman, biological ultrastructure, Blood Research Laboratory, National Red Cross, Bethesda, Maryland (1973-1975). He currently serves as a council member of the National Council on Radiological Protection and Measurements as well as a member of the Stem Cell Radiobiology Working Party of the International Commission of Radiological Protection, and previ- ously he served on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization-related research study groups that focused on radiation injury and medical countermeasures. In addition to his research interest in the nature and mechanisms of action of radioprotective agents, he also has an interest in structural and function studies of radiation-induced hematopathology, cellular mechanisms of pre-

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT clinical phase leukemogenic processes, and mechanistic studies on red cell destruction during infectious hemolytic anemias. Dr. Seed earned his B.A. from the University of Connecticut and his M.S. and Ph.D. (microbiology) from Ohio State University. James M. Tien, Ph.D., E.E., S.M., B.E.E., became dean of the University of Miami College of Engineering in September 2007. An internationally renowned researcher, he formerly served as the Yamada Corporation Pro- fessor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and was founding chair of its Department of Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems and professor in its Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering. Dr. Tien joined the Rensselaer faculty in 1977 and twice served as its acting dean of engineering. In 2001 he was elected to membership in the National Acad- emy of Engineering, one of the highest honors accorded to an engineer. His research interests include systems modeling, public policy, decision analysis, and information systems. He has served on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Board of Directors (2000-2004) and was its vice president in charge of the Publication Services and Products Board and the Educational Activities Board. Tien earned his bachelor’s degree in electri- cal engineering from Rensselaer and his Ph.D. in systems engineering and operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Robert J. Ursano, M.D., is professor of psychiatry and neuroscience and chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He is also direc- tor of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. He has served as the Department of Defense representative to the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and is a past member of the NIMH Rapid Trauma and Disaster Grant Review Section. Dr. Ursano is the editor of the journal Psychiatry and senior editor of the Textbook of Disaster Psychiatry. He has received the Depart- ment of Defense Humanitarian Service Award and a Lifetime Achieve- ment Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. Dr. Ursano is widely published in the field of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the psychological effects of terrorism, bioterrorism, traumatic events and disasters, and combat. He has been a member of many national advisory boards related to mental health including the IOM Committee on Psychological Responses to Terrorism and the Committee on PTSD and Compensation. He was a physician in the U.S. Air Force, retiring after 20 years service with the rank of colonel. Dr. Ursano received his M.D. from Yale University.

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 APPENDIX D CONSULTANT William F. Stephens has managed the advanced practice center at Tarrant County Public Health, working in the area of public health preparedness and new product development, for nearly 5 years. Tarrant County Public Health is one of eight centers nationwide funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Association of County and City Health Officials to enhance public health preparedness through innovation. His areas of focus have been in chemical/radiological training and exercises as well as biosurveillance system development and evaluation. Prior to joining Tarrant County Public Health, Mr. Stephens worked in senior man- agement roles in the scientific/biomedical imaging industry and in several defense systems programs. He contributed to product development for the first commercially available digital mammography systems and for image sensors used in the Human Genome Program. He holds an M.S. degree from Texas Tech University, Lubbock. STAFF Michael McGeary is a senior program officer at the Board on Health Sciences Policy and director of the nuclear detonation committee. He is a political scientist specializing in science, health, and technology policy analysis and program evaluation. Before 2004 he was an independent consultant for 9 years to government agencies, foundations, and nonprofit organizations in issues of science and technology. Between 1981 and 1995 Mr. McGeary was at IOM and the National Academy of Sciences, where he was staff director of more than a dozen major reports on such topics as federal funding of research and development; graduate education and employment of scientists and engineers; and priority setting, funding, and management of the National Institutes of Health. From 2004 to 2007 he was staff director for IOM committees that rec- ommended improvements in the systems for determining disability at the Social Security Administration and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Mr. McGeary is a graduate of Harvard University and has completed all requirements for a doctorate in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology except the dissertation. Susan R. McCutchen is a senior program associate at the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She has been on staff at the National Academies for 28 years and has worked in several institutional divisions and with many different boards, committees, and panels within those units. The studies in which she has participated have addressed a broad range of subjects and focused on a variety of issues related to science and technology for international development, technology transfer, aeronautics and the U.S. space program,

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 MEDICAl PREPAREDNESS FOR A TERRORIST NuClEAR EVENT natural disaster mitigation, U.S. education policy and science curricula, needle exchange for the prevention of HIV transmission, the scientific merit of the polygraph, human factors engineering, research ethics, disability compensation programs, health hazard evaluation, and medical and public health preparedness for catastrophic events. She has assisted in the produc- tion of more than 50 publications. Ms. McCutchen has a B.A. in French, with minors in Italian and Spanish, from Ohio’s Miami University, and an M.A. in French, with a minor in English, from Kent State University. Andrew Pope, Ph.D., is director of IOM’s Board on Health Sciences Policy. He has a Ph.D. in physiology and biochemistry from the University of Maryland and has been a member of the National Academies staff since 1982 and the IOM staff since 1989. His primary interests are science policy, biomedical ethics, and environmental and occupational influences on human health. During his tenure at the National Academies, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, disability preven- tion, and biologic markers to the protection of human subjects of research, NIH priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation pol- icy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of IOM’s Cecil Award and the National Academy of Sciences President’s Special Achievement Award.