STUDIES ON CONSEQUENCES OF GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN FOR THE MOTHER AND CHILD

TABLE F-1 Consequences of Gestational Weight Gain

Study Description

Study Design/Patient Population/Inclusion-Exclusion Criteria

Protocol Including: Pregravid Weight (how measured), Total Weight Gain (how measured), and Baseline Characteristics

Author, year:

Abrams et al., 1989

Design:

  • Cohort

  • Retrospective

Preterm birth: delivery between 26-37 weeks’ gestation

Country/Setting:

USA (Perinatal Nutrition Project, San Diego, CA)

Gestational age: maternal estimate of the last menstrual period, antenatal sonography before 28 weeks’ gestation, Dubowitz score, or a combination of these.

Total Study N:

2,163

Group Description:

G1: Preterm births

G2: Term births

Enrollment period:

Jan 1978 to Dec 1986

Prepregnancy weight: maternal recall at first visit (prepregnancy weight for height based on the 1959 Metropolitan Insurance standards of desirable weight).

Study Objective:

To examine the relationship between maternal weight gain and preterm delivery.

Group N:

G1: 118

G2: 2,045

Inclusion criteria:

  • Low income

  • Prepregnancy underweight or prepregnancy obesity

  • Low pregnancy weight gain

  • Anemia

  • History of obstetric complications

  • Concurrent medical complication

Total pregnancy weight gain: estimated by subtracting the prepregnancy weight from the last measured weight before delivery.

Exclusion criteria:

  • Antepartum death

  • Twin gestation

  • Major congenital anomalies

  • Induced deliveries (not preceded by spontaneous labor or rupture of membranes)



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement