PART I:
ANALYSES FROM DR. NOHR

COMBINED ASSOCIATIONS OF PREPREGNANCY BODY MASS INDEX AND GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN WITH THE OUTCOME OF PREGNANCY. ANALYSES BASED ON THE DANISH NATIONAL BIRTH COHORT

Ellen Aagaard Nohr, PhD

Associate Professor of Epidemiology

University of Aarhus, Denmark


The combined associations of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes have until recent years mostly focused on birth weight. Large data collections with detailed information about maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes are now available which makes it possible to investigate these associations in a broader range of maternal and neonatal outcomes while adjusting for important maternal life style factors. Such a study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) (Nohr et al., 2008) was presented to the Committee to Reexamine IOM Pregnancy Weight Guidelines in June 2008 along with a number of analyses that focused on the BMI-specific association between GWG and all outcomes included in the study. These supplementary analyses are presented in the following in the “First DNBC Report.” At the meeting in June, the IOM committee requested new analyses for some outcomes where very low and very high categories of GWG as well as obese class I and obese class II + III were included. This work is presented in the “Second DNBC Report.” In August 2008, additional analyses were presented for the IOM committee that provided information in subgroups of women defined by parity, height, smoking and young age. These results are presented in the “Third DNBC Report.”

First DNBC Report
Study Population

The Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) is a nationwide study of 100,419 pregnancies among 92,274 women recruited 1996-2002. More detailed descriptions of the study methods and the recruitment were previously published (Olsen et al., 2001; Nohr et al., 2006; Danish National Birth Cohort homepage, available online: http://www.ssi.dk/sw9314.asp [accessed February 2009]). Briefly, data were collected during two telephone interviews during pregnancy at approximately 16 and 30 weeks of



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