FIGURE 3-2 Birth weight as a function of maternal weight gain and prepregnancy weight for height.

FIGURE 3-2 Birth weight as a function of maternal weight gain and prepregnancy weight for height.

SOURCE: Modified from Abrams and Laros (1986). This article was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 154(3), Prepregnancy weight, weight gain, and birth weight, pp. 503-509. Copyright Elsevier (1986).

(BMI ≥ 35) was lower (11.1 and 8.7 kg, respectively) than among non-obese women (Cedergren, 2006). Low GWG (< 8 kg) occurred in 30.2 and 44.6 percent of the obese and very obese women, respectively. Among the 62,167 women in the Danish National Birth Cohort with data on GWG, about 36 percent of the obese women exhibited low rates of gain (0.28 kg per week). Fifty percent gained between 0.28 and 0.68 kg per week, and 14 percent gained > 0.68 kg per week (Nohr et al., 2007).

Obese women (BMI = 30-40) participating in a prenatal intervention gained less weight (adjusted GWG = 7.52 kg) than controls (adjusted GWG = 9.78 kg) and experienced no difference in pregnancy outcome (Claesson et al., 2008). In summary, from a population perspective, obese women as a group gain less weight than non-obese women, nevertheless GWG can vary widely.

Twin Pregnancies

Total GWG in twin pregnancies is generally higher than in singleton pregnancies with means ranging from 15 to 22 kg (Appendix C, Table C-2).



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