Appendix L
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Ellen Wright Clayton, J.D., M.D. (Chair), is Rosalind E. Franklin Professor of Genetics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University, where she is a professor of law and pediatrics. She is also the director of Vanderbilt’s Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society and is a practicing pediatrician at Vanderbilt Medical Center. Her research and teaching interests include pediatrics, medical ethics, legal and ethical issues in children’s and women’s health, and genetics and health policy. She has served as a member on numerous committees for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Working Group of the Newborn Screening Taskforce, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources Services Administration. Dr. Clayton has served as a consultant to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the topic of clinical pharmacology during pregnancy. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on several National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committees, as well as the IOM’s Health Sciences Policy Board. She has authored numerous publications in books, medical journals, interdisciplinary journals, and law journals on the intersection of law, medicine, and public health. Dr. Clayton received her M.D. from Harvard University and her J.D. from Yale University.


Ronald M. Andersen, Ph.D., is Wasserman Professor Emeritus in the departments of Health Services and Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles. He has taught courses in health services organization, research



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Appendix L Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS Ellen Wright Clayton, J.D., M.D. (Chair), is Rosalind E. Franklin Profes- sor of Genetics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University, where she is a professor of law and pediatrics. She is also the director of Vanderbilt’s Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society and is a practicing pediatrician at Vanderbilt Medical Center. Her research and teaching interests include pediatrics, medical ethics, legal and ethical issues in children’s and women’s health, and genetics and health policy. She has served as a member on numerous committees for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), includ- ing the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Working Group of the Newborn Screening Taskforce, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources Services Administration. Dr. Clayton has served as a consultant to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the topic of clinical pharmacology during pregnancy. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on several National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committees, as well as the IOM’s Health Sciences Policy Board. She has authored numer- ous publications in books, medical journals, interdisciplinary journals, and law journals on the intersection of law, medicine, and public health. Dr. Clayton received her M.D. from Harvard University and her J.D. from Yale University. Ronald M. Andersen, Ph.D., is Wasserman Professor Emeritus in the departments of Health Services and Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles. He has taught courses in health services organization, research 459

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460 A REVIEW OF THE HHS FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM methods, evaluation, and leadership. He has studied access to medical care for his entire professional career. Dr. Andersen developed the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, which has been used extensively nation- ally and internationally as a framework for utilization and cost studies of general populations, as well as special studies of minorities, low-income populations, children, women, the elderly, oral health, the homeless, and the HIV-positive population. He has directed three national surveys of access to care and has led numerous evaluations of local and regional populations and programs designed to promote access to medical care. Dr. Andersen’s other research interests include international comparisons of health services systems, graduate medical education curriculum, physician health services organization integration, and evaluations of geriatric and primary care delivery. He was on the founding Board of the Association for Health Services Research and has been chair of the Medical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association. In 1994 he received the association’s Leo G. Reeder award for Distinguished Service to Medical Sociology; in 1996 he received the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research; and in 1999 he received the Baxter Allegiance Health Services Research Prize. Dr. Andersen received his Ph.D. in sociology from Purdue University. Dyan A. Aretakis, F.N.P., M.S.N., P.N.P., is project director of the Teen Health Center of the University of Virginia Health System, which she cofounded in 1991 to offer reproductive health care to local, mainly medi- cally uninsured adolescents. She is also a practicing family nurse practi- tioner at the center, which serves more than 3,600 patients each year. In her role as director, Ms. Aretakis has developed patient and peer educa- tion programs and conducted state-wide professional conferences. She has served on numerous committees and advisory boards related to child and adolescent health. She is also a frequent speaker on the topic of adolescent reproductive health for professional groups, the Medical School and the School of Nursing at the University of Virginia, and statewide conferences and associations. Ms. Aretakis holds family nurse practitioner, master of science in nursing with a specialty in pediatrics, and pediatric nurse practi- tioner degrees from the University of Virginia. Jennifer S. Barber, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the Institute for Social Research and an associate professor of sociology at the University of Michigan. She studies childbearing behavior, intergenerational processes, and attitude–behavior relationships in both the United States and Nepal. In the United States, Dr. Barber is currently conducting a mixed-method data collection project, combining survey interviews with semistructured interviews and a weekly electronic journal. Her current research in Nepal

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461 APPENDIX L focuses on intergenerational influences on family formation attitudes and behavior. She has published extensively on topics related to family relation- ships and childbearing, and is a member of the National Council on Family Relations and the Population Association of America. Dr. Barber holds a Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Pennsylvania State University. Miriam A. Bender, J.D., is chief executive officer of Women’s Health Virginia, a statewide nonprofit organization that promotes and improves Virginia women and girls’ health and well-being. The organization focuses attention on the health needs of women and girls in Virginia; addresses women and girls’ health comprehensively and as a continuous process; takes a multidisciplinary approach that includes economic, educational, cultural, environmental, social, and medical issues; and connects people and organizations in the public and private sectors and from around the state to work together. In her capacity as a practicing attorney, Ms. Bender works primarily with nonprofit organizations on issues regarding develop- ment and public policy. She previously taught at the University of St. Louis School of Law and served as associate general counsel at the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture and in various positions at the Federal Trade Commis- sion. She has served on the Board of Directors of the League of Women Voters of Virginia and of Charlottesville and Albemarle County and the Virginia Citizens Consumer Council. Ms. Bender received her J.D. from Columbia University. Regina M. Benjamin, M.D., M.B.A., is founder and CEO of the Bayou Clinic in Bayou La Batre, Alabama. She is chair-elect of the Federation of Sate Medical Boards and vice chair of the American Medical Association’s (AMA’s) Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs. She is former associate dean for rural health at the University of South Alabama’s College of Medi- cine in Mobile, where she administered the Alabama Area Health Educa- tion Centers program and previously directed its Telemedicine program. She is former president of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama. In 1998 Dr. Benjamin was the U.S. recipient of the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights. She has also served as president of the AMA’s Education and Research Foundation. She has done missionary work in Honduras and was previously on the Board of Physicians for Human Rights. Dr. Benjamin received her M.D. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and completed her residency in family practice at the Medical Center of Central Georgia. After receiving an M.B.A. from Tulane Univer- sity, she converted her solo practice in Bayou La Batre to a rural health clinic. Dr. Benjamin spent several of her early years moonlighting in emer- gency rooms and nursing homes to sustain her practice, which is currently recovering from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

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462 A REVIEW OF THE HHS FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM Claire D. Brindis, Dr.P.h., is a professor of pediatrics and health policy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and is the director of UCSF’s Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies. She is also the co- director of the Bixby Center for Reproductive Health Research and Policy. Her research interests focus on adolescent and children’s health policy and women’s health. Dr. Brindis leads a multidisciplinary team evaluating California’s Office of Family Planning’s Family PACT (Planning, Access, Care and Treatment) program and has conducted program evaluations of teenage pregnancy and parenting programs, teenage pregnancy prevention programs, and community coalitions focused on teenage pregnancy preven- tion. She also serves as a frequent policy advisor to federal, state, and local policy makers and private foundations. Her writings, publications, and personal consultation in the field of adolescent pregnancy prevention have been used extensively in the planning and implementation of various state and federal initiatives. She previously served as chair of the Population, Reproductive Health and Family Planning Section of the American Public Health Association and as chair of the Board of Directors of Advocates for Youth. Dr. Brindis’ educational background includes a Ph.D. in public health and behavioral sciences from the University of California, Berkeley and a masters degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Sarah S. Brown, M.S.P.h., is cofounder and CEO of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Previously, she was a senior study director at the IOM, where she completed studies on unintended pregnancy, health care reform, substance abuse among pregnant women, access to prenatal care, and prevention of low birth weight. Ms. Brown has served on the advisory boards of many national organizations, including the Population Advisory Board of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the DC Mayor’s Committee on Reducing Teenage Pregnancies and Out-of-Wedlock Births, and Teen People magazine. She holds a masters degree in public health from the University of North Carolina. Betty A. Chewning, Ph.D., is a professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy and directs the Sonderegger Research Center. Through- out her research, she has sought to build on the strengths and perspec- tives of communities while conducting both descriptive and evaluation research related to abstinence and contraceptive education interventions in diverse populations. She created and evaluated computer-based abstinence, sexual decision making, and contraceptive modules in the Body Awareness Resource Network. Dr. Chewning analyzed the data set to identify risk and protective factors related to delayed initiation of sexual intercourse and

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463 APPENDIX L early adoption of effective contraception by sexually active adolescents. Building on this work, she developed and evaluated the impact of a com- puterized contraceptive decision aid. She developed the computer program by involving low-literacy adolescents from Cabrini Green, a public housing unit in Chicago. She implemented and evaluated this program in family planning clinics in Chicago and Madison, Wisconsin. Following this work, Dr. Chewning was asked by the Great Lakes Intertribal Council to identify needs and interventions for Indian reservation youth to reduce sexual risk taking and HIV exposure. This work, as well as her earlier work, helped document protective factors that can help buffer sexual risk taking by Indian adolescents. Dr. Chewning’s Ph.D. is in educational psychology, and she has done postdoctoral work in industrial engineering. Angela Diaz, M.D., M.P.h., is the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Adolescent Health at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center. She has been providing direct medical services to children and adolescents for more than 25 years, partic- ularly in identifying and engaging trauma-affected adolescents. The Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center is a unique program that provides com- prehensive, integrated, interdisciplinary primary care, reproductive health, mental health, and health education services to teens. Dr. Diaz is president of the Children’s Aid Society Board of Trustees. She has been active in inter- national health projects in Asia, Central and South America, Europe, and Africa. She has published numerous articles on topics including child and adolescent sexual abuse, adolescents’ access to health care, and health ser- vices for immigrants. Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Diaz has been a White House Fellow, was awarded the American Academy of Pediatrics Founders of Adolescent Health Award, and received the Alexander Rich- man Commemorative Award for Ethics and Humanism in Medicine from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She served with the FDA’s Pediatric Advisory Committee and with the NIH State of the Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health Risk Social Behaviors in Adoles- cents. Dr. Diaz her M.D. at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and her M.P.H. from Harvard University. vivian M. Dickerson, M.D., is a clinical professor of obstetrics and gyne- cology at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) Medical Center. In addition, she is Executive Medical Director of Women’s Health at Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in Newport Beach, California. She is certi- fied by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, for which she is currently an examiner. Dr. Dickerson is a prolific lecturer and writer, having published numerous peer reviewed articles on topics including con- traception, menopause, PMS, and obesity. Throughout her career, she has

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464 A REVIEW OF THE HHS FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM received a variety of awards and honors, including the American Medical Women’s Association Gender Equity Award, the UCI College of Medicine Golden Apple Teaching Award, and the District Service Award from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She currently serves as editor in chief for The Female Patient. Annually since 2001, Dr. Diaz has been named by Woodward and White as one of the Best Doctors in America. In 2004, she became president of the American College of Obste- tricians and Gynecologists, the third woman ever to achieve this national honor. Dr. Dickerson graduated summa cum laude from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and subsequently spent 2 years in Togo, West Africa, as a health educator with the United States Peace Corps. Upon her return, she attended the University of California, San Diego, medical school and completed her internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at UCLA Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Stephen F. heartwell, Dr.P.h., is Deputy Director of Domestic Programs for the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. The foundation concentrates its resources on activities in education, service delivery, and global devel- opment, with a focus on decreasing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Dr. Heartwell retired from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, after serving 35 years as professor and director of the Division of Community Women’s Health Care. This division provided comprehensive women’s health care services to more than 72,000 women annually in Dallas County, with a special emphasis on Title X–supported family planning services. It also provided certificate women’s health care nurse practitioner education through a Title X grant for more than 20 years. The teaching and research programs of the division have received national recognition. Prior to his appointment at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dr. Heartwell held the position of assistant professor and associate director of the Institute for Health Services Research at Tulane University. He received an M.P.H. in epidemiology and a Dr.P.H. in family health and population dynamics from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Judith R. Lave, Ph.D., is chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management, director of the Health Administration Program, codirector of the Center for Research on Health Care, and professor of health economics at the University of Pittsburgh. She is also director of the Pennsylvania Medicaid Policy Center. Her research interests include health care financ- ing, costs of graduate medical education, health insurance, health care for children, the economics of mental health, and the cost of illness. Prior to coming to the University of Pittsburgh, she was director of the Office of Research at the Health Care Financing Administration, now the Centers for

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465 APPENDIX L Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dr. Lave is a member of the IOM, where she serves on the Board of Health Care Services and the National Acad- emy for Social Insurance and is a distinguished fellow of AcademyHealth. She is also on the Technical Advisory Group for the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. She was a commissioner on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and its predecessor commission, the Pro- spective Payment Assessment Commission. Dr. Lave received her Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Ellen L. Rautenberg, M.h.S., is president and CEO of Public Health Solu- tions (formerly the Medical and Health Research Association [MHRA] of New York City, Inc.), which is dedicated to improving the health status and well-being of New Yorkers, with special emphasis on the city’s high- risk, underserved populations. Among its responsibilities, Public Health Solutions has been a Title X grantee since 1982 and is a provider of repro- ductive health services to 20,000 low-income women through a network of seven centers. Before joining Public Health Solutions (then MHRA) in 1995, Ms. Rautenberg was executive director for special population projects at the New York Academy of Medicine, as well as an indepen- dent consultant specializing in public health policy/program development and strategic planning. She has an extensive background in the planning and management of public health programs. Between 1981 and 1990, she worked for the New York City Department of Health both as assistant commissioner for planning, evaluation, and grants and as assistant com- missioner for AIDS program services. Prior to her experience in city gov- ernment, Ms. Rautenberg ran the Community and Family Health Center in Baltimore, developed the perinatal health plan for central Maryland, and was a family planning counselor in Washington, DC. She is a member of the Public Health Council of New York State and of the boards of the Human Services Council of New York, the National Network of Public Health Institutes, and the Family Planning Councils of America. She is immediate past chair of the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association. Ms. Rautenberg holds an M.H.S. in comprehensive health planning and administration from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Eduardo J. Sanchez, M.D., M.P.h., is vice president and chief medical officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas. He served as Texas commis- sioner of health from 2001 to 2006, initially as commissioner of the Texas Department of Health (TDH) from November 2001 through August 2004 and then as commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) from September 2004 to October 2006. As TDH commissioner, Dr. Sanchez oversaw programs such as family and community health services,

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466 A REVIEW OF THE HHS FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment, disease pre- vention and all-hazards preparedness, and environmental and consumer safety and regulatory programs. The Texas DSHS, a single agency made up of the state’s former public health, mental health, and substance abuse agen- cies, has more than 11,500 employees and operates on an annual budget of more than $2.3 billion. Dr. Sanchez is a fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. He actively practiced in Austin, Texas, from 1992 to 2001. He also served as health authority and chief medical officer for the Austin–Travis County Health and Human Services Department from 1994 to 1998. Dr. Sanchez received an M.D. from the University of Texas South- western Medical School in Dallas. He holds an M.P.H. from the University of Texas School of Public Health and an M.S. in biomedical engineering from Duke University. Jeannette E. South-Paul, M.D., is Andrew W. Mathieson Professor and Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include measuring and eliminating health and health care disparities in maternal/child health and chronic disease, and evaluat- ing cultural competence in clinicians and trainees. She served as a family physician in the U.S. Army for 22 years and still maintains an active family medicine practice, including maternity care, at the UPMC Matilda Theiss Health Center. During her service with U.S. Army, Dr. South-Paul served as chair of the Department of Family Medicine and vice president for minority affairs at the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. She has also served as national president of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine and president of the Uniformed Services Academy of Family Physicians, and has chaired cultural competence and diversity committees at the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Association of American Medical Colleges, developing tools for teaching and assessing cultural competence. She also has an interest in sociocultural issues for health care and health care for special populations, and has volunteered in clinics for the uninsured both in Maryland and in Pittsburgh. Dr. South-Paul is a widely recognized speaker and author on the impact of race, ethnicity, and culture on health; cultural diversity and academic medicine; and the development of minority faculty. She holds an M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and completed postgraduate training in family medicine at the Eisenhower Army Medical Center and a fellowship in faculty development at the Uni- versity of North Carolina.

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467 APPENDIX L IOM STAFF Adrienne Stith Butler, Ph.D., is a senior program officer in the IOM’s Board on Health Sciences Policy. Previously, she was study director for the IOM report Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention. She also served as study director for the report Preparing for the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism: A Public Health Strategy, a study conducted by the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, and for the IOM reports In the Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce and Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Dis- parities in Health Care, studies conducted by the Board on Health Sciences Policy. Prior to working at the IOM, Dr. Butler served as James Marshall Public Policy Scholar, a fellowship cosponsored by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the American Psychological Asso- ciation (APA). In this position, based at the APA in Washington, DC, she engaged in policy analysis and monitored legislative issues related to ethnic disparities in health care and health research, racial profiling, and mental health counseling provisions in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Dr. Butler, a clinical psychologist, received her Ph.D. in 1997 from the University of Vermont. She completed postdoctoral fellowships in adolescent medicine and pediatric psychology at the Univer- sity of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. Marnina Kammersell, M.A., is a research associate in the Board on Health Sciences Policy. Prior to joining the IOM, she was a health science pol- icy analyst in NIH’s Clinical Research Policy Analysis and Coordination (CRpac) program within the Office of Biotechnology Activities. Her work at NIH focused on the ethics, policy, and regulation of clinical trials. Ms. Kammersell previously spent time as a research assistant at The George Washington University’s Center for International Science and Technology Policy, and she also served as a legislative intern for the House of Represen- tatives’ Committee on Science. She was 2005 Christine Mirzayan Fellow at the National Academies, where she worked on the Rising above the Gather- ing Storm report. She holds a M.A. in public policy with a focus on health policy from The George Washington University and a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Michigan. Thelma L. Cox is a senior program assistant in the Board on Health Sci- ences Policy. During her years at the IOM, she has also provided assistance to the Division of Health Care Services and the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. Ms. Cox has worked on numerous IOM reports, including In the Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity

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468 A REVIEW OF THE HHS FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAM in the Health-Care Workforce; Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care; and Ethical Issues Relating to the Inclu- sion of Women in Clinical Studies. She has received the National Research Council Recognition Award and two IOM Staff Achievement Awards.