Appendix A
Biographies of Committee Members

David W. Johnson, Jr., Chair, retired from his position as director of the Materials Research Department at Agere Systems. Previously he had been director of the Materials Research Department at Bell Laboratories. He continues as an adjunct professor of materials engineering at the Stevens Institute of Technology and editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society. His expertise is in ceramic materials development and processing, specifically, electronic, magnetic, and optical materials. His research focused on bulk and thin-film fabrication and processing of materials for communications technologies. He was awarded a B.S. and Ph.D. in ceramic science from the Pennsylvania State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow and past president of the American Ceramic Society.


Ronald Bianchetti is principal/owner of Blackstone Group, Ltd., a corrosion engineering consulting firm located in El Dorado Hills, California. He is a registered corrosion engineer in the state of California and is a certified National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) cathodic protection specialist. Mr. Bianchetti has been a member of NACE for 30 years, during which time he has been extremely active. He currently serves as Western Area director for the 2006-2009 term. He has served as chair for the San Francisco Section (1984-1986); vice chair, San Francisco Section (1984-1985); secretary/treasurer, San Francisco Section (1983-1984); membership chair, San Francisco Section (1980-1983); and chair, NACE ProgramGolden Gate Metals and Welding Conference-1985. He has also held the positions of trustee, San Francisco Section (1990-1992); chair, Western Region (1994-1996);



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Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members David W. Johnson, Jr., Chair, retired from his position as director of the Materi- als Research Department at Agere Systems. Previously he had been director of the Materials Research Department at Bell Laboratories. He continues as an adjunct professor of materials engineering at the Stevens Institute of Technology and editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society. His expertise is in ceramic mate- rials development and processing, specifically, electronic, magnetic, and optical materials. His research focused on bulk and thin-film fabrication and processing of materials for communications technologies. He was awarded a B.S. and Ph.D. in ceramic science from the Pennsylvania State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow and past president of the American Ceramic Society. Ronald Bianchetti is principal/owner of Blackstone Group, Ltd., a corrosion engi- neering consulting firm located in El Dorado Hills, California. He is a registered corrosion engineer in the state of California and is a certified National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) cathodic protection specialist. Mr. Bianchetti has been a member of NACE for 30 years, during which time he has been extremely active. He currently serves as Western Area director for the 2006-2009 term. He has served as chair for the San Francisco Section (1984-1986); vice chair, San Fran- cisco Section (1984-1985); secretary/treasurer, San Francisco Section (1983-1984); membership chair, San Francisco Section (1980-1983); and chair, NACE Program- Golden Gate Metals and Welding Conference-1985. He has also held the positions of trustee, San Francisco Section (1990-1992); chair, Western Region (1994-1996); 5

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corrosion Prevention standards ductile iron PiPe  for and vice chair, Western Region (1994-1995). He has served in various NACE ser- vices offices, including as a member of the board of directors (1992-1995); chair, Publications Committee (1992-1995); past chair, Publications Committee (1994- 1997); and chair of Symposium, Corrosion/91 on “Corrosion and Its Control in Reinforced Concrete Structures.” For his many contributions, Mr. Bianchetti received the T.J. Hull Award and the NACE Distinguished Service Award. He received his B.S. in engineering in 1975 from the University of California, Davis. In 1981, he obtained his Executive M.B.A. from St. Mary’s College of California. He has served as chair, co-chair, and active member on a variety of technical and board-level committees throughout his tenure with NACE. Richard J. Fields is metallurgy consultant with KT Consulting. Previously he worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards [NBS]), where he supervised groups of scientists doing research in metal forming, nanolaminates, and powder metallurgy. He was the principal technical investigator on metallurgical aspects of the congressionally mandated investigation of the collapse of the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers and was supervisory metallurgist managing the Time Dependent Failure Group in NBS’s Fracture and Deformation Division. This group ran the metallographic facilities as well as carrying out mechanical testing research programs for the U.S. Navy, the Federal Railroad Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Dr. Fields was group leader for the Materials Performance Group in NIST’s Metallurgy Division. Part of this group of 11 professionals runs the U.S. National Hardness Standardization Facility, certify- ing primary hardness standards. As the supervisor of the Materials Performance Group, he started a program on sheet metal forming with the auto industry. He also started a program on modeling bullets and armor for the National Institute of Justice and a program on fire-resistant structural steels. He has an extensive list of publications, patents, and awards available on request. He has performed research and written numerous papers relevant to the prediction of fracture behavior in pipeline steels. In particular, he was principal author on NIST Report 89-4136, An Assessment of the Performance and Reliability of Older ERW Pipelines, written at the request of Senators Kit Bond and John Danforth. He was appointed by Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole to the Office of Pipeline Safety’s Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Committee and served for 6 years, 3 of these as secretary. He is now part of a research team that is developing experimental and analytical methods to assess the high-rate fracture- and crack-arrest behavior of high-strength pipeline steels. Dr. Fields received his undergraduate degrees in chemistry and metallurgi- cal engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He received an M.S. in engi- neering and applied physics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in engineering materials from Cambridge University. He has conducted metallurgical research

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aPPendix a  and participated in mechanical test standards development activities for nearly 40 years. He is currently the U.S. representative on the Ductility Subcommittee of the International Organization for Standardization. Dr. Fields is a member of ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) International and of the American Academy of Mechanics and is chair of the ASTM Subcommittee on Ductility and Formability. He is an active member of the Fire Resistive Steel Task Group. He received a Bronze Medal from the National Bureau of Standards for his research on fracture and crack arrest in high-strength steels, and a silver medal from the Department of Commerce for scientific achievement in materials properties mea- surements and modeling. Carol A. Handwerker is a professor of materials engineering at Purdue University, having joined Purdue in August 2005 after serving for 9 years as chief of the NIST Metallurgy Division. Professor Handwerker’s research is focused on the thermody- namics and kinetics of interface processes, with applications to microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and printed electronics. She received a B.A. in art history from Wellesley College, and an S.B. in materials science and engineering, an S.M. in ceramics, and an Sc.D. degree in ceramics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Following a year’s postdoctoral research on electronic packag- ing at MIT, she joined NBS in 1984 as a postdoctoral research associate, working on the relationship between stress and diffusion in solids and on composition effects on sintering and grain growth. She became a permanent staff member at NBS in 1986, group leader of the Materials Structure and Characterization Group in 1994, and division chief of the Metallurgy Division in March 1996. She is a fellow of the ASM (American Society of Materials) International and of the American Ceramic Society (ACS), and is past chair of the ACerS Basic Science Division. She serves on the Technical Advisory Committee and the R&D Committee for iNEMI and the Visiting Committee for the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineer- ing, and has served on numerous other boards, including the board of trustees of the Gordon Research Conferences, the advisory committee of Carnegie Mellon University’s Mesoscale Interface Mapping Project, and the editorial board for the Annual Reiews of Materials Research. She has written more than 90 scientific publications. John O’Brien is the director of the Water and Wastewater Division for Genesee County, Michigan, providing utility service to more than 500,000 people. Mr. O’Brien is a certified operator in the state of Michigan. Previously he had worked at the city of Battle Creek, holding the position of utilities manager. During his 8 years with the city, Mr. O’Brien successfully completed the requirements for reg- istration as a professional engineer in the state of Michigan. In 1994 Mr. O’Brien accepted a position with the consulting firm Consoer Townsend Envirodyne. While

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corrosion Prevention standards ductile iron PiPe  for so employed, he was a lead engineer for water and wastewater facilities. During his years as a consultant, he earned his Indiana Engineering License and received his certification as a diplomat from the American Academy of Environmental Engi- neers. Mr. O’Brien graduated from Michigan Technological University with a bach- elor’s degree in civil engineering and a second degree in analytical chemistry. Matthew O’Keefe is currently a professor of metallurgical engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and director of the Graduate Center for Materials Research at Missouri University of Science and Technology (MST). He received a B.S. degree from MST and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, both in metallurgical engineering. He previously worked for AT&T Micro- electronics, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. His research at MST focuses on specializing in the deposition, characterization, and industrial use of thin films, coatings, and environmentally friendly materials and processes for corrosion, wear, and microelectronic applications. John R. Plattsmier serves as national director of pump stations and pipelines for HDR Engineering and has extensive experience in the field of engineering consult- ing. He has worked on various types of projects in management, technical, over- sight, and reviewer roles. Mr. Plattsmier serves on national committees with the American Water Works Association and the American Society of Civil Engineers helping to set standards for pipeline planning and design. Prior to joining HDR, he was the director of design services for a consulting firm where he managed a staff of more than 200 engineers, architects, and designers to deliver designs for water facilities around the globe. He also served as a civil design discipline director (chief civil engineer), with responsibility for development and implementation of cor- porate standards, staff development, project delivery, and reviews. Mr. Plattsmier received a B.S. in civil engineering from Louisiana State University. Alberto A. Sagüés is Distinguished University Professor at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida. Previously he held positions at the University of Kentucky, Argonne National Laboratory, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, and Columbia University. He also was appointed by President Clinton to be a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board from 1997 to 2002. Dr. Sagüés received his Ph.D. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University and his licentiate in physics from National University of Rosa- rio, Argentina, and is a registered professional engineer in Florida. His areas of expertise are corrosion of engineering materials, concrete, materials for infrastruc- ture, materials for energy systems, durability forecasting, physical metallurgy, and nuclear waste disposal. He has authored 190 publications in the technical literature

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aPPendix a  and 3 U.S. patents and has directed to completion the work of 30 M.S. and Ph.D. engineering students. William S. Spickelmire is president and owner of RUSTNOT Corrosion Control Services, Inc., and has more than 31 years of experience as a project manager in all facets of corrosion control. He is a certified NACE cathodic protection special- ist with expertise that encompasses rehabilitation, material selection, coating, and cathodic protection. He has conducted soil, water, and site corrosion investigations to evaluate and provide corrosion control recommendations for clients in diverse applications, conditions, and geographical locations. He has provided corrosion recommendations and designs for water and wastewater collection, transmis- sion, storage, and treatment facilities; natural gas and petroleum facilities, tank farms, and high-pressure transmission and distribution systems; high-voltage power transmission lines; dams and diversion structures; bridges; mining facilities and solution mining projects; irrigation systems; pump stations; fish hatcheries; and mining, power, and industrial plants. National and small engineering firms, utilities, military organizations, industry, private companies, and public agencies throughout the United States have retained his services. He has provided corrosion control presentations and papers on an international basis. Mr. Spickelmire has extensive experience on corrosion considerations, comparisons, risk assessments and life-cycle analysis, and corrosion control requirements for different types of pipelines in a variety of soil conditions and project requirements. Recommenda- tions for pipeline projects have included evaluation of replacement, slip lining, concrete linings, and inversion (in situ form) lining, material selection, cathodic protection, loose-bonded (polyethylene) and tight-bonded coatings, and corrosion control designs. He has provided corrosion recommendations for several thousand miles of water, irrigation, and sewer transmission pipelines with diameters up to 120 inches, as wells as over 2,000 miles of water distribution piping, and over 3,000 miles of oil and gas transmission pipelines. A former employee for more than 17 years with a major national engineering firm, CH2M HILL, he was a corrosion project manager for numerous projects throughout the United States. He has a B.S. from the College of Idaho and is a member of the American Water Works Associa- tion, NACE, and the Society of Protective Coatings. He is a member of the NACE TG 14 Committee for Corrosion and Corrosion Control for Cast and Ductile Iron Pipe and a member of the NACE Water Advisory Board. He has been an active member of NACE since 1978, serving in all offices of the Intermountain Section and receiving that section’s Distinguished Service Award in 1996. David Trejo is the Zachry Career Development Professor I in the Zachry Depart- ment of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University. He received his bachelor’s, master’s, and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of California

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corrosion Prevention standards ductile iron PiPe 50 for at Berkeley with minors in electrochemistry and materials science. He has signifi- cant background in investigating, testing, assessing, and evaluating mechanisms of deterioration of various material and structural systems, including pipes, walls, foundations, bridges, water tanks, and other structures. He has participated in federal and state research investigating the physical, chemical, and electrochemical deterioration and repair of infrastructure systems. He has more than 10 years of experience in the construction and engineering industry, where he worked on many infrastructure projects, including testing and evaluating materials and structures for deterioration.