Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Bernard D. Goldstein (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, where he previously served as dean. Before coming to Pittsburgh, he was the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1983–1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chairman of the NIH Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clear Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He is a member of the IOM, where he has co-chaired the section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology and is current head of the Environmental and Occupational Health and Toxicology Interest Section. He is also chair of the NRC Standing Committee on Risk Assessment Issues and Review. Dr. Goldstein is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American College of Physicians, American College of Preventive Medicine, and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He is the past recipient of the Robert A. Kehoe Award of Merit of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the Katherine Boucot Sturgis award from the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Toxicology, and the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society for Risk Analysis. He received an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine, and is board certified in internal medicine, hematology, and toxicology.


Joseph M. DeSimone (Vice Chair) is the Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the W.R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University. He also serves as director of the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes and is co-principal investigator for the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. He is also the director of the Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience, and Technology at UNC-CH. Among Dr. DeSimone’s notable inventions is an environmentally friendly manufacturing process that relies on supercritical carbon dioxide for the creation of fluoropolymers, such as Teflon­®. More recently, he worked with a team to design a polymer-based, fully bioabsorbable, drug-eluting stent, which helps keep a blocked blood vessel open after a balloon-angioplasty and is absorbed by the body within 18 months. Dr.



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Bernard D. Goldstein (Chair) is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, where he previously served as dean. Before coming to Pittsburgh, he was the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1983–1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chairman of the NIH Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clear Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He is a member of the IOM, where he has co-chaired the section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology and is current head of the Environmental and Occupational Health and Toxicology Interest Section. He is also chair of the NRC Standing Committee on Risk Assessment Issues and Review. Dr. Goldstein is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American College of Physicians, American College of Preventive Medicine, and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He is the past recipient of the Robert A. Kehoe Award of Merit of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the Katherine Boucot Sturgis award from the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Toxicology, and the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society for Risk Analysis. He received an M.D. from New York University School of Medicine, and is board certified in internal medicine, hematology, and toxicology. Joseph M. DeSimone (Vice Chair) is the Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the W.R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University. He also serves as director of the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes and is co-principal investigator for the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. He is also the director of the Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience, and Technology at UNC-CH. Among Dr. DeSimone’s notable inventions is an environmentally friendly manufacturing process that relies on supercritical carbon dioxide for the creation of fluoropolymers, such as Teflon®. More recently, he worked with a team to design a polymer-based, fully bioabsorbable, drug-eluting stent, which helps keep a blocked blood vessel open after a balloon-angioplasty and is absorbed by the body within 18 months. Dr. 11

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12 EFFECTIVENESS OF NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM DeSimone’s current interests are focused on applied fabrication technologies from the microelectronics industry to make nanocarriers for use in medicine. Dr. DeSimone holds more than 115 issued patents with more than 70 new patent applications pending, and he has published more than 240 peer-reviewed scientific articles. In 2005, Dr. DeSimone was elected into both the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. DeSimone has received numerous awards and recognition, including the Lemelson-MIT Prize, Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award (1997), the Engineering Excellence Award by DuPont (2002), and the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention (2005). He is the cofounder of Liquidia Technologies, Inc., and a cofounder of BioStent which was sold to Guidant (now Abbott Vascular). He has served on the DELS Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Dr. DeSimone earned his B.S. in chemistry from Ursinus College and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Michael S. Ascher is the Senior Medical Advisor to the California Emergency Management Agency (CALEMA) and a visiting researcher in the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California (Davis) School of Veterinary Medicine. Previously, he has been the lead for biological defense activities in the California Department of Health Services and principal investigator of the CDC grant to the state for preparedness and response. Other past positions include chief of the Viral and Rickettsial Laboratory, Division of Communicable Disease Control, at the California Department of Health Services. He also served in the U.S. Army as chief of medicine and in the Bacteriology Division at U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease. In the area of biological defense, he has served on the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board and an interagency advisory panel on Biological Warfare Preparedness for the 21st Century and has consulted for the Department of Defense, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MITRE Corporation, the National Domestic Preparedness Office of the FBI, and others. Dr. Ascher’s research interests include mechanisms of protective immunogenicity of microbial vaccines and advanced methods for diagnosis of infectious diseases. He currently serves on the National Academies Standing Committee on Biodefense at the U.S. Department of Defense. Dr. Ascher received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. James W. Buehler is a Research Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and a member of the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Research at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. Prior to joining the Emory faculty in 2002, he served for 21 years in the U.S. Public Health Service as a medical epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he worked in the areas of general field epidemiology, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and, for a brief period in 2001, anthrax. His work in public health surveillance—population health monitoring—has spanned analysis, development, management, application of surveillance information to programs and policies, and ethics. Dr. Buehler’s applied research interests center on improving public health capacity to detect and respond to epidemics and other community health emergencies and on improving the use of epidemiology in public health systems and practice. Karen S. Cook is the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, chair of the Department of Sociology, and director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRISS). She joined the faculty of the Department of Sociology in academic year 1998–1999. Before coming to Stanford she was on the faculties of the University of Washington and of Duke

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13 APPENDIX B University. Professor Cook was elected vice president of the American Sociological Association in 1994–1995. She also has served as vice-president of the International Institute of Sociology and as chair of Research Committee 42 (social psychology) in the International Sociological Association. In 1996, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in 1998–1999, she was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. In 2004, she received the Cooley-Mead Award for career contributions to social psychology from the American Sociological Association. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. Professor Cook has a long-standing interest in social exchange, bargaining, and social justice and is currently involved in a large interdisciplinary project focusing on trust in social relations. She is a co-author of Cooperation Without Trust? (2005) and her edited or jointly edited books include The Limits of Rationality (1990), Sociological Perspectives on Social Psychology (1995), Trust in Society (2001), and Trust and Distrust in Organizations (2004). Currently she also serves as co-editor of the Annual Review of Sociology. In the past, she has served on many editorial boards and as editor of Social Psychology Quarterly (1988–1992). Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation, and articles based on this work have appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, the American Sociological Review, Social Psychology Quarterly, and other journals in sociology. Professor Cook received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Norman A. Crouch is assistant commissioner at the Minnesota Department of Health. In this position he is responsible for overseeing the department’s Health Protection Bureau, which includes the Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response, as well as the Divisions of Environmental Health, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control, and the Public Health Laboratory. Previously, he was director of the department’s Public Health Laboratory Division. Prior to his current involvement in the practice of public health at the state level, with interest in the development of emergency response networks to detect and respond to emerging biological and chemical health threats, Dr. Crouch was on the faculty in the Department of Microbiology at the University of Iowa and the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Rockford, Illinois. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors and as president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL). He currently serves on several APHL committees, which includes being chairman of the APHL Emergency Preparedness and Response Committee and member of the APHL Finance Committee. In addition, he serves on the APHL subcommittee for Continuity of Operations Planning and the steering committee for Laboratory Performance Standards. He is board certified in medical and public health virology by the American Board of Medical Microbiology. Dr. Crouch received his B.S. degree in bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and his Ph.D. in medical microbiology also from the University of Wisconsin. He conducted post- doctoral studies at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine in Hershey, and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Francis J. Doyle III holds the Duncan and Suzanne Mellichamp Chair in Process Control in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), as well as appointments in the Electrical Engineering Department and the Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program. He is the associate director of the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies. Prior to his appointment at UCSB, he held faculty appointments at Purdue University and the University of Delaware, and he held visiting positions at DuPont,

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14 EFFECTIVENESS OF NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM Weyerhaeuser, and Stuttgart University. Dr. Doyle’s research interests are in systems biology, network science, modeling and analysis of circadian rhythms, drug delivery for diabetes, model- based control, and control of particulate processes. He is currently the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, and holds associate editor positions with the Journal of Process Control, the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, and Interface. In 2005, he was awarded the Computing in Chemical Engineering Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for his innovative work in systems biology. He received his B.S.E. from Princeton, Certificate of Post-graduate Studies from Cambridge, and Ph.D. from California Institute of Technology, all in chemical engineering. Seth Foldy is State Health Officer and Administrator of the Division of Public Health for the State of Wisconsin. Until recently, he served as an associate professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin and principal of health.e.volution consulting. He also cofounded and served as chief medical officer of the Wisconsin Health Information Exchange, which recently began supplying public health agencies with real-time hospital and clinic data. In addition, he assisted the Argonne National Laboratory Decision and Information Sciences division on emergency public health response exercises, trainings, modeling, and information fusion systems. Dr. Foldy was previously Commissioner of Health in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and had earlier practiced and taught urban family medicine in Worcester, Massachusetts, and Cleveland, Ohio. He helped create the SURVNET, a 14- jurisdiction communicable disease surveillance network; the SARS Surveillance Network, which deployed syndromic surveillance rapidly across four states; and a regional emergency medicine internet for surveillance and clinician alerting. He led the local elimination of monkeypox at the center of its first hemispheric appearance in 2003, and participated in a joint health task force responding to the 2005 Indian Ocean tsunami. He chaired the National Association of County and City Health Officials’ Information Technology Committee and served on the board of the eHealth Initiative Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control Information Council, and facilitated the formation of the Joint Public Health Informatics Taskforce. Dr. Foldy holds degrees from Stanford University, Case Western Reserve University, and the Medical College of Wisconsin, board certifications in Family and Preventive Medicine, and the Roemer Prize for Creative Local Public Health Work. Elin A. Gursky is a fellow and principal deputy for Biodefense, National Strategies Support at ANSER. She has held various senior-level government and private sector positions. As Director of Epidemiology and Communicable Disease Control (1987–1995) for Prince Georges County, Maryland, Dr. Gursky addressed and helped reverse epidemic rates of communicable diseases, including infectious and congenital syphilis, enteric pathogens, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Gursky subsequently served as deputy health commissioner for New Jersey (1995–1998), building and leading the Public Health Protection and Prevention Programs. She designed and implemented a statewide interactive electronic communication system to improve the accuracy and timeliness of disease reporting, surveillance, and response. She developed a fax-based Health Alert system for immediate dissemination of urgent infectious disease information to the medical community. She also instituted a comprehensive review and re- writing of practice standards for the state’s 117 local health departments to rebuild the state’s public health infrastructure. Dr. Gursky has also served as Vice President for Public Health for a

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15 APPENDIX B 10-hospital system and as a private consultant on hospital business strategies. She received a D.Sc. from Johns Hopkins University in 1985. Sandra Hoffmann is a fellow at Resources for the Future. Before joining Resources for the Future she served on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison LaFollette School of Public Affairs. She also practiced law with the DC office of McKenna, Conner, and Cuneo, specializing in chemical and pesticide regulatory law. Dr. Hoffmann’s research focuses on the economics of health and environmental risk management, in particular, health valuation and integration of economics and health risk assessment. Her research on health valuation includes studies assessing the social cost of environmental pollution in China, assessments of the social cost of foodborne illness in the United States and a series of studies on parental decision making affecting children’s risk of developmental harm from environmental neurotoxins. She has advised the EPA and the OECD on improving regulatory economic analysis related to children’s environmental health. A significant body of her work has focused enhancing the usefulness of foodborne illness disease surveillance to public health decision makers. She has testified on this issue before USDA and FDA. She is co-editor with Michael Taylor of Toward Safer Food: Perspectives on Risk and Priority Setting, which sets out a systematic structure for designing a more science/risk-based approach to food safety regulation in the United States. Dr. Hoffmann received a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. Calvin B. Johnson is vice president and chief medical officer of the Temple University Health System in Philadelphia. Previously he was secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, a position he held from 2003 to 2008. He is a board-certified pediatrician. Before his appointment at the Department of Health, Dr. Johnson was a physician in the Pediatric Emergency Department at the Temple University Children’s Medical Center in Philadelphia and an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Temple University School of Medicine. In Philadelphia, he served on the board of directors of the Philadelphia Health Management Corporation. He has also served as medical director of the Division of Family Health Services in the New York City Department of Health. Dr. Johnson was a commissioned officer in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army Reserve/National Guard, achieving the rank of major. Dr. Johnson received his undergraduate degree from Morehouse College, his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Paul Keim holds the Cowden Endowed Chair in Microbiology and is the Arizona Regents Professor at Northern Arizona University (NAU). He is the director of NAU’s Microbial Genetics and Genomics Center. He also directs the Pathogen Genomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), a nonprofit research institute. He maintains his Laboratory Affiliate at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the Division of Biosciences. Dr. Keim’s current research interests include genomic analysis of bacterial pathogens and the application of genomic technology to clinical diagnostic problems. He currently serves as principal investigator or co-principal investigator for three projects unrelated to the BioWatch program that are funded by the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA): (1) Microbial Forensic Signatures on the TIGR system, (2) Forensic Assays for the Analysis of Ricinus communis, and (3) High Resolution Forensic Assays–Phase II award. Dr.

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16 EFFECTIVENESS OF NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM Keim’s laboratory has developed high-resolution strain-typing analysis methods for the forensic analysis of B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and F. tularensis. He has participated in collaborative projects with scientists from the former Soviet Union to understand the ecology and epidemiology of these pathogens. Dr. Keim has served on grant review panels for USDA and NIH; on advisory groups for the FBI, GAO, and HHS; and on three previous NRC committees. He is currently a member of the FBI’s Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism, the National Science Advisory Board for Biodefense, and the executive advisory committee for the Pacific Southwest Regional Center for Biodefense. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. Dr. Keim received a B.S. in biology and chemistry from Northern Arizona University and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Kansas. He has done post-doctoral work in genetics, genomics, and biotechnology. Arthur L. Kellermann is professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine and associate dean for Health Policy at Emory University School of Medicine. He also holds an appointment as a professor in Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. He has conducted landmark research on prehospital cardiac care, use of diagnostic technology in emergency departments, and health care for the poor. His papers have been published in many of the nation’s leading medical journals. He is a recipient of the Hal Jayne Academic Excellence Award from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, the Excellence in Science award from the Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section of the American Public Health Association and the Scholar/Teacher Award from Emory University. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for 2006–2007. Dr. Kellermann is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has served as co-chair of the IOM Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance and as a member of the IOM Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System. Kenneth P. Kleinman is associate professor of Ambulatory Care and Prevention at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. Before joining the faculty of the Harvard Medical School in 2000, Dr. Kleinman was an associate research scientist at the New England Research Institutes, Watertown, Massachusetts. His research focuses on public health surveillance, particularly the statistical identification of aberrations that signal the onset of events of public health significance, and evaluating such statistical methods, including syndromic surveillance. He serves as director of the statistical core of a CDC program grant for a Center for Excellence in Public Health Informatics. He earned his B.A. in sociology and anthropology from Oberlin College, and his S.M. and Sc.D. in biostatistics from the Harvard School of Public Health. Marcelle Layton is the assistant commissioner for the Bureau of Communicable Disease at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The bureau is responsible for the surveillance and control of 71 infectious diseases and conditions reportable under the New York City Health Code. Current areas of concern include antibiotic resistance; foodborne, waterborne, and tickborne diseases; hepatitis C; and biological disaster planning for the potential threats of bioterrorism and pandemic influenza. She completed an internal medicine residency at the University Health Science Center in Syracuse, New York, and an infectious disease fellowship at Yale University. In addition, Dr. Layton spent 2 years with the Centers for Disease Control and

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17 APPENDIX B Prevention as a fellow in the Epidemic Intelligence Service, where she was assigned to the New York City Department of Health. In the past, she has volunteered or worked with the Indian Health Service, the Alaskan Native Health Service, and clinics in northwestern Thailand and central Nepal. She has previously served on the IOM Forum on Microbial Threats. Dr. Layton received her medical degree from Duke University. Eva K. Lee is an associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, and director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare. She is also a senior research professor at the Atlanta VA Medical Center. Dr. Lee earned a Ph.D. at Rice University in the Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, and received her undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Hong Kong Baptist University, where she graduated with Highest Distinction. Dr. Lee was awarded a NSF/NATO postdoctoral fellowship on Scientific Computing, and a postdoctoral fellowship from Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum Informationstechnik Berlin in 1995 for Parallel Computation. Dr. Lee works in the area of mathematical programming and large-scale computational algorithms with a primary emphasis on medical/healthcare decision analysis and logistics operations management. She tackles challenging problems in health systems and biomedicine through systems modeling, algorithm and software design, and decision theory analysis. Specific research areas include health risk prediction, early disease prediction and diagnosis, optimal treatment strategies and drug delivery, healthcare outcome analysis and treatment prediction, public health and medical preparedness, large-scale healthcare/medical decision analysis and quality improvement. Dr. Lee’s research in logistics focuses on large-scale optimization and algorithmic advances for optimal operations planning and resource allocation. She has developed decision support systems for inventory control; large-scale truck dispatching, scheduling, and transportation logistics; telecommunications; portfolio investment; and emergency treatment response and facility layout and planning. Shane D. Mayor is a research professor in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences at California State University, Chico. From 2003 to 2008, he served as scientist at the Earth Observing Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colorado. Dr. Mayor completed his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 2001 with a focus on using volume image lidar (VIL) data to improve fine-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. Mayor worked at NCAR through the Advanced Studies Program and the Atmospheric Technology Division to develop REAL—an eye-safe version of the Wisconsin VIL. Through a technology-transfer effort, commercial versions of REAL now operate for urban aerosol surveillance and at a military test range. Prior to his years at Wisconsin, Dr. Mayor worked at NASA Langley on differential absorption lidars, and at NCAR on heterodyne Doppler lidars. Dr. Mayor previously served on the NRC Committee on Testing and Evaluation of Biological Stand-off Detection Systems. Timothy F. Moshier is senior principal scientist in the Environmental Science Center of Syracuse Research Corporation. Previously, he was staff member in the Biodefense Systems Group at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory. Other former positions were with tactical and research, development, and acquisition (RD&A) organizations for the U.S. Army. Mr. Moshier also served 6 months with the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) in 1995, investigating Iraq’s biological weapons program. Among his RD&A assignments, Mr. Moshier has served at U.S.

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18 EFFECTIVENESS OF NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM Army Dugway Proving Ground (Installation Biological Safety Officer and Operations Officer), the Joint Program Office for Biological Defense (Detection Project Officer and Manager for the Critical Reagents Program), and as the Project Manager for the Joint Biological Point Detection System. Mr. Moshier has also worked for SPARTA, Inc., as Chief, Homeland Security Division, where he was responsible for the daily operation of an organization consisting of threat and international relations specialists; chemical, biological, and nuclear defense experts, and a group of explosive ordnance disposal experts. He has served on three NRC committees: Biodefense at the U.S. Department of Defense, Testing and Evaluation of Biological Standoff Detection Systems, and Committee on Review of Testing and Evaluation Methodology for Biological Point Detectors. He received a B.A. in biology from the State University of New York College at Oswego, an M.S. in biology from Syracuse University, and a Masters in Military Art and Science from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Frederick A. Murphy is professor, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston. At UTMB he is also a member of the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, the Galveston National Laboratory, the Center for Biodefense and Emerging Diseases, and the McLaughlin Endowment Program. Previously, he served as dean and distinguished professor, School of Veterinary Medicine, and distinguished professor, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis. Dr. Murphy received a B.S. and D.V.M. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. He served as chief, Viral Pathology Branch, then director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, and later director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His honors include elected membership in the Institute of Medicine, the Presidential Rank Award from the U.S. government, membership in the German Academy of Natural Sciences and the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences. Recently he has served as a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Council on Public Health Preparedness. Currently he serves on the NRC/IOM Committee on Biodefense at the U.S. Department of Defense. He also has been co-chair of the NRC Committee on Occupational Health and Safety in the Care and Use of Nonhuman Primates, and a member of the IOM Committee on Microbial Threats; the NRC Committee on Public Health, Agriculture, Basic Research, Counter-terrorism and Non-proliferation Activities in Russia; and the IOM Committee on Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. Royce W. Murray is Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH). He was educated at Birmingham Southern College (B.S., 1957) and Northwestern University (Ph.D., analytical chemistry, 1960), joined the University of North Carolina faculty in 1960 and became Kenan Professor of Chemistry in 1980. He served as Chemistry Department chairman 1980–1985. Dr. Murray has been colleague to nearly 150 graduate and post-graduate students, with whom he has published over 425 papers. Among his many awards are the Olin Palladium Medal (The Electrochemical Society), the Charles N. Reilley Award (Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry), the Faraday Medal (Royal Society of Chemistry, UK), Breyer Medal (Royal Australian Chemical Institute), American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry, the North Carolina Award in Science, the Pittsburgh Analytical Chemistry Award, and the Luigi Galvani Medal of the Italian Chemical Society. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served since 1991 as editor-in-chief of the journal Analytical Chemistry.

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19 APPENDIX B Dr. Murray’s research interests include electroanalytical methods, the molecular design of electrode surfaces and nanoparticles, electrochemically reactive semi-solid media, mass transport and electron transfer dynamics, electrocatalysis, and voltammetry in extreme media. Douglas K. Owens is a general internist; a senior investigator at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System; a professor of medicine and, by courtesy, of health research and policy at the Stanford School of Medicine; and a core faculty member at the Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research (CHP/PCOR). He directs the Stanford–UCSF Evidence-based Practice Center; the Program on Clinical Decision Making and Guideline Development at PCOR; the Palo Alto VA’s Postdoctoral Informatics Fellowship Program; and the Palo Alto VA’s Health Services Research Fellowship Program. Owens’ research focuses on technology assessment, cost-effectiveness analysis, evidence synthesis, biodefense, and methods for clinical decision making. Dr. Owens received a B.S. and an M.S. from Stanford University and an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Owens is chair of the Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee of the American College of Physicians. He is past-president of the Society for Medical Decision Making, and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians. He received the Under Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Health Services Research from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Stephen M. Pollock is Herrick Emeritus Professor of Manufacturing and Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. He has been involved in applying operations research and decision analysis methods to understand and influence a variety of operational phenomena, including military search and detection, criminal recidivism, manufacturing process monitoring, sequential allocation of resources, predictive and proactive maintenance, networks of queues, the stochastic behavior of infectious disease epidemics, and the optimization of radiation oncology plans. He has authored over 60 technical papers, co-edited two books, and has served as a consultant to over 30 industrial, governmental and service organizations. Professor Pollock was associate editor and area editor of Operations Research, senior editor of IIE Transactions, associate editor of Management Science, and on the editorial boards of other journals. He has served on various advisory boards for the National Science Foundation and on the Army Science Board. He was president of the Operations Research Society of America in 1986 and awarded the 2001 INFORMS Kimball Medal for contributions to operations research and the management sciences. He a fellow of INFORMS and the AAAS and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Among other NRC activities, he chaired the CNSTAT panel on Operational Test Design and Evaluation of the Interim Armored Vehicle, served on the panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems, the Committee on Technologies to Deter Currency Counterfeiting, and the Panel on Methodological Improvements to the DHS Biological Agent Risk Analysis. I. Gary Resnick is the Bioscience Division Leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is an internationally recognized scientist in the area of chemical and biological defense, with extensive leadership and management experience. His scientific and technical accomplishment encompasses all aspects of research, development, and testing of chemical warfare agents and chemical/biological defense systems. In addition, he has been an active member of the interagency and international chemical and biological arms control communities. His previous

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20 EFFECTIVENESS OF NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE SYSTEM positions include: Associate Center Director for Chemical and Biological (CB) Defense, Center for Homeland Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory; Director of CB Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency; Director of Research and Technology, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center; Technical Director, U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground; and staff scientist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He holds a B.S. from Cornell University, an M.S. from Long Island University, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Rhode Island. R. Paul Schaudies is president and CEO of GenArraytion, a company that is developing products and services for rapid diagnosis of infectious disease agents, including those underlying sepsis and hospital-acquired infections. Previously, he founded and managed the Biological and Chemical Defense Division at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). His expertise is in biotechnology and nanotechnology. Dr. Schaudies spent 4 years with the Defense Intelligence Agency as collections manager for biological and chemical defense technologies. As such, he initiated numerous intra-agency collaborations that resulted in accelerated product development in the area of biological warfare agent detection and identification. He has served on advisory panels for the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Department of Energy. He has bench research experience managing laboratories at Walter Reed, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and as a visiting scientist at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Schaudies was the science advisor to the EPA on-scene coordinator and incident commander at the anthrax incident in Washington, DC. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. from Temple University School of Medicine in the department of biochemistry. Dr. Schaudies is currently a member of the NRC/IOM Committee on Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures and has served on the NRC Committee on Protecting Occupants of DOD Buildings from Chemical or Biological Release and the NRC Committee on Materials and Manufacturing Processes for Advanced Sensors. Jerome S. Schultz is on the faculty at the University of California, Riverside, where he is Distinguished Professor in the Bourns College of Engineering, chair of the Bioengineering Department, and director of the Center for Bioengineering Research. He founded the Department of Bioengineering when he joined the UC Riverside faculty in 2004. Dr. Schultz began his career in the pharmaceutical industry (Lederle Laboratories) and then joined the University of Michigan, where he was chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering. He spent 2 years at the National Science Foundation as deputy director of the Engineering Centers Program. In 1987, he joined the University of Pittsburgh as director of the Center for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, and was the Founding Chairman of the Department of Bioengineering. He recently spent a year at NASA’s Ames Research Center as a senior scientist in their Fundamental Biology Program. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society, and was a founding Fellow and President of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Schultz received his B.S. and M.S in Chemical Engineering from Columbia University, and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin.