Appendix C
Agenda

Workshop on Research and Applications Needs in Flood Hydrology Science

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

The National Academies Keck Center, Room 109

500 5th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001


Sponsored by the National Research Council's Committee on Hydrologic Science

8:30

Welcomes and Introductions

Eric Wood, Chair, COHS

8:35

Orientation

David Ford, Dennis Lettenmaier, Vic Baker

8:45

What should be the underpinnings and motivating science and applications questions in a new science of hydrologic extremes?

Speaker:

Upmanu Lall, Columbia University

Discussion leader:

Dennis Lettenmaier, University of Washington

9:30

What can and should be the role of new observing methods, both in situ (including new sensor technologies) and remote sensing? How might approaches to the estimation of hydrologic extremes differ based on the richness of the historic observations?

Speaker:

Doug Alsdorf, Ohio State University

Discussion leader:

Charles Vorosmarty, City University of New York

10-15

Break

10:30

Breakout sessions – Room 110

Rapporteurs:

Eric Wood, Princeton University

 

Geoff Bonnin, NOAA National Weather Service

11:30

Rapporteurs report back; discussion

12:15

Lunch – Meeting Room

1:15

What should be the interface between the science of hydrologic extremes and applications issues, such as the need to replace standard methods,



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Appendix C Agenda Workshop on Research and Applications Needs in Flood Hydrology Science Wednesday, October 15, 2008 The National Academies Keck Center, Room 109 500 5th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 Sponsored by the National Research Council's Committee on Hydrologic Science 8:30 Welcomes and Introductions Eric Wood, Chair, COHS 8:35 Orientation David Ford, Dennis Lettenmaier, Vic Baker What should be the underpinnings and motivating science and applications 8:45 questions in a new science of hydrologic extremes? Speaker: Upmanu Lall, Columbia University Discussion leader: Dennis Lettenmaier, University of Washington What can and should be the role of new observing methods, both in situ 9:30 (including new sensor technologies) and remote sensing? How might ap- proaches to the estimation of hydrologic extremes differ based on the rich- ness of the historic observations? Speaker: Doug Alsdorf, Ohio State University Discussion leader: Charles Vorosmarty, City University of New York 10-15 Break 10:30 Breakout sessions – Room 110 Rapporteurs: Eric Wood, Princeton University Geoff Bonnin, NOAA National Weather Service 11:30 Rapporteurs report back; discussion 12:15 Lunch – Meeting Room What should be the interface between the science of hydrologic extremes 1:15 and applications issues, such as the need to replace standard methods, 25

OCR for page 25
26 Appendix C such as Bulletin 17B and other methods that are based on stationary statis- tical methods? Speaker: Tim Cohn, U.S. Geological Survey Discussion leader: David Ford, David Ford Consulting How can advances in techniques for the accurate analysis of ancient flood 2:00 events aid estimation of future flood magnitudes and frequency, and un- derstanding of the generative processes for extreme flood phenomena? Speaker: Lisa Ely, Central Washington University Discussion leader: Vic Baker, University of Arizona 2:45 Break 3:00 Breakout sessions – Room 110 Rapporteurs: John England, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Jim O'Connor, U.S. Geological Survey 4:00 Rapporteurs report back; Discussion 4:45 Summary and wrap-up 5:00 p.m. Adjourn