Appendix C
Biographies of Committee Members

Barry M. Horowitz (NAE), Co-Chair, is professor of systems engineering at the University of Virginia. His areas of expertise include the design and development of large-scale networks and information systems; application of security technology to large, network-based commercial systems; and the design of large systems that involve coupling private data systems or mission-critical support systems with open networks, such as the Internet. He previously served as chair and founder of Concept Five Technologies and as president and chief executive officer of the MITRE Corporation and of Mitretek Systems. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on Freight Transportation Information Systems Security. Dr. Horowitz is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a current member of the Naval Studies Board.


Nils R. Sandell, Jr., Co-Chair, is vice president and general manager of BAE Systems Advanced Information Technologies. His areas of expertise include military command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems and technologies. He is a former associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he lectured in estimation and control theory, stochastic processes, and computer systems. Dr. Sandell has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as a member of the NRC Committee on Network-Centric Naval Forces and co-chair of the NRC Committee on C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups. Currently, he is a member of the NRC Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices, and he served



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Appendix C Biographies of Committee Members Barry M. Horowitz (NAE), Co-Chair, is professor of systems engineering at the University of Virginia. His areas of expertise include the design and develop- ment of large-scale networks and information systems; application of security technology to large, network-based commercial systems; and the design of large systems that involve coupling private data systems or mission-critical support systems with open networks, such as the Internet. He previously served as chair and founder of Concept Five Technologies and as president and chief executive officer of the MITRE Corporation and of Mitretek Systems. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on Freight Transportation Information Systems Security. Dr. Horowitz is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a current member of the Naval Studies Board. Nils R. Sandell, Jr., Co-Chair, is vice president and general manager of BAE Systems Advanced Information Technologies. His areas of expertise include mili - tary command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems and technologies. He is a former associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he lectured in estimation and control theory, stochastic processes, and computer systems. Dr. Sandell has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as a member of the NRC Committee on Network-Centric Naval Forces and co-chair of the NRC Committee on C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups. Currently, he is a member of the NRC Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices, and he served 151

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152 INFORMATION ASSURANCE FOR NETWORK-CENTRIC NAVAL FORCES on the NRC Committee on the “1,000 Ship Navy”—A Distributed and Global Maritime Network. M. Brian Blake is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Com- puter Science at Georgetown University. With expertise in information technology and in computer science and engineering, he has research interests that include the investigation of automated approaches to sharing information and software capabilities across organizational boundaries, sometimes referred to as enterprise integration. Previously, at Trident Data Systems (now General Dynamics), he was a senior computer scientist responsible for the design and development of applica- tions for the intelligence community; in addition, Dr. Blake served as a software architect at Lockheed Martin Mission Systems, where he managed the object- oriented design of modules in the reengineering of the Global Positioning System upload infrastructure. In the area of service-oriented architecture, Dr. Blake has served as an expert-level systems architect consultant for organizations such as the Department of Defense, the Department of Justice, and the intelligence com - munity. He is a member of the National Science Foundation’s Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Advisory Board. Clyde g. Chittister is the chief operating officer of the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at Carnegie Mellon University. He has nearly 40 years of experience in the software and systems engineering fields, including at SEI. Mr. Chittister has held a wide range of management roles, including founder and program director of SEI’s Risk Management and Real-Time Systems Programs. He began his career in the field of real-time process-control systems, working on the design, implementa- tion, and maintenance of automated transportation and building conrol systems. He is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and serves as vice chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Software Engineer- ing and vice president of finance for the IEEE Systems Council. Mr. Chittister is president-elect of the IEEE Systems Council and an author of numerous published articles on software acquisition, risk management, terrorism, and information technology. Anup K. ghosh is a research professor and chief scientist at the Center for Secure Information Systems (CSIS) in the Volgenau School of Information, Technology, and Engineering at George Mason University. Dr. Ghosh’s areas of expertise include software security, operating system security, networking security, and malicious code. In addition, he serves as a principal investigator for a multidisciplinary university research initiative aimed at detecting attacks, corruptions, and failures in enterprise-wide servers and client workstations. Prior to joining George Mason University, Dr. Ghosh was a senior scientist and program manager in the Advanced Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he managed an extensive portfolio

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153 APPENDIX C of information assurance and information operations programs for the Depart - ment of Defense. Raymond Haller is senior vice president and director of MITRE’s Department of Defense (DOD) Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), where he is responsible for operations, sponsor relations, and advancing the center’s overall strategy in information systems technologies. Previously, Mr. Haller was senior vice president of the Command and Control Center, one of two operating centers in the DOD C3I FFRDC, where he was responsible for integration, partnerships, and transformation of military capabilities, including the identification, initiation, and execution of joint C3I activities. Since joining MITRE in 1977, he has held various positions of increasing responsibility and demonstrated an ability to help the government understand the range of technical possibilities while balancing mission needs with cost and technical feasibility. Richard J. Ivanetich is Institute Fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), having been appointed to that position in 2003. His expertise spans a number of areas of defense systems, technology, and operations analyses, relating primarily to computer and information systems, command-and-control systems and procedures, modeling and simulation of systems and forces, crisis manage - ment, and strategic nuclear forces. His previous positions at IDA include service as the director of the Computer and Software Engineering Division and assis - tant director of the Systems Evaluation Division. Prior to joining IDA in 1975, Dr. Ivanetich was assistant professor of physics at Harvard University. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Cyber and C2 Panels of the U.S. Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group and as a member of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group; he is a former member of the Naval Studies Board. In 2003, Dr. Ivanetich was elected a National Associate of the National Academies. John W. Lindquist is president and chief executive officer of EWA Information and Infrastructure Technologies, Inc., a company providing information assurance and information system security engineering services to the government and com- mercial sectors. He is also chair of the International Systems Security Engineer- ing Association, a not-for-profit organization for systems security engineering. Mr. Lindquist has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory groups, including as a charter member of the Information Technology Sector Coordinating Council and co-chair of its Plans Working Group. Currently he is a member of the Department of Homeland Security’s Critical Infrastructure Protection Advisory Committee, a group responsible for developing and implementing the National Infrastructure Protection Plan and the supporting IT Sector Security Plan.

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154 INFORMATION ASSURANCE FOR NETWORK-CENTRIC NAVAL FORCES Mark W. Maier is a systems architect and engineer at the Aerospace Corpora - tion. His research areas include systems architecture, radar signal processes, data compression, microsatellites, and computer networks. At the Aerospace Corpo - ration, Dr. Maier developed and now teaches the corporate certificate program in systems architecting. Previously, he was an assistant professor and then an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). Dr. Maier’s work on microsatellites at UAH led to the licensing of a radiation-tolerant computer systems design. Prior to joining UAH, Dr. Maier was an engineer and manager at the Hughes Aircraft Company, where he pioneered an approach to software-based electronic warfare signal analysis that is now widely deployed in production systems. Richard W. Mayo, VADM, USN (Ret.), is executive vice president for network and enterprise services at CACI International, Inc. In 2004, he retired from the Navy after 35 years of service, concluding as the first commander of the Naval Network Warfare Command, where he was responsible for implementing and securing Navy networks for enhanced warfighter support. Previously, Admiral Mayo served as the director of the Space, Information Warfare, Command and Control Directorate (N6), and as Commander of the U.S. Naval Forces Korea. In addition, from 1993 to 1995, he served as assistant deputy director of the C4 Systems at the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Ann K. Miller is the Cynthia Tang Missouri Distinguished Professor of Computer Engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Her areas of expertise include information assurance, with an emphasis on computer and network security; and computer engineering, with an emphasis on large-scale systems engineering, satellite communications, and real-time software. She previ- ously served as deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition (C4I; electronic warfare; and space); Department of the Navy chief information officer; and director for information technologies for DOD research and engineering. Dr. Miller served as a member of the NRC Committee on the Role of Naval Forces in the Global War on Terror. Daniel M. Schutzer is executive director of the Financial Services Technology Consortium (FSTC), a consortium of banks, financial service providers, national laboratories, and universities, all aimed at addressing strategic business and technology issues, including security and information assurance for the financial sector. Prior to joining FSTC, he served as a director and senior vice president of Citigroup, with responsibilities ranging from trading to retail banking to security and corporate technology. Dr. Schutzer also served as the technical director of Naval Intelligence and Navy Command, Control, and Communications. He has also worked at Sperry Rand, Bell Laboratories, and IBM. He has authored more than 65 publications and 7 books. Dr. Schutzer is a member of the Banking

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155 APPENDIX C Industry Technology Sector (BITS) Advisory Council and is a fellow of the New york Academy of Sciences. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on Critical Information Infrastructure Protection and the Law. Ralph D. Semmel is head of the Applied Information Sciences Department and Infocentric Operations Business Area at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). His areas of expertise include database systems, artificial intelligence, and systems engineering. He previously served at JHU/APL as deputy director of the Research and Technology Development Center and as business area executive for infocentric operations and science and technology, where he established and guided strategic initiatives in global information net - works, intelligence systems, information operations, and information assurance. Dr. Semmel also serves as chair of both the computer science and information assurance professional graduates programs at the Johns Hopkins University. Robert M. Shea, Ltgen, USMC (Ret.), is a strategic adviser at Smartronix, a networking and systems management company providing support to military and commercial operations. In 2007, he retired from the U.S. Marine Corps after 36 years of service, concluding as director of C4 Systems at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, where he was the principal adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on all C4 matters in the DOD. Previously, General Shea served as the deputy commander for U.S. Forces, Japan; other command positions that he held included commander of the Marine Component to the Joint Task Force Computer Network Defense, director of the Marine Corps Command and Control Systems School, and commanding officer of the 9th Communications Battalion, I Marine Expeditionary Force, during Desert Shield and Desert Storm. John P. Stenbit (NAE) is an independent consultant whose expertise includes system architectures for complex military and communication systems and sys - tems engineering of information systems. Mr. Stenbit formerly served as assistant secretary of defense for networks and information integration and as the chief information officer for the DOD. Prior to serving in the DOD, he served as execu - tive vice president at TRW, Inc. Mr. Stenbit has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as a member of the NRC Committee on Advancing Software-Intensive Systems Productivity. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a current member of the Naval Studies Board. Salvatore J. Stolfo is professor of computer science at Columbia University. He received his PhD from New york University Courant Institute in 1979 and has been on the faculty of Columbia ever since. He has published scientific papers in the areas of parallel computing, artificial intelligence knowledge-based systems, data mining, computer security and intrusion, and anomaly detection systems. His

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156 INFORMATION ASSURANCE FOR NETWORK-CENTRIC NAVAL FORCES most recent research has been in distributed data mining systems with applications to fraud and intrusion detection in network information systems. He has patents in the areas of parallel computing and database inference, Internet privacy, intrusion detection, and computer security. Dr. Stolfo served as chair of the Computer Sci - ence Department and director of the Center for Advanced Technology at Columbia University. He recently co-chaired several workshops in data mining, intrusion detection, and the digital government. He is a board member and treasurer of a private organization of Professionals for Cyber Defense. Recently, he participated in a DARPA Innovative Space Based Radar Antenna Technology study and served as an adviser to the director of the DARPA Information Processing Techniques Office as a member of the DARPA Futures Panel. Edward B. Talbot has been manager of the Computer and Network Security Department at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore, California, since 2006. His areas of expertise include network security operations (wired and wireless) and network architectural needs. Mr. Talbot’s responsibilities include managing the Center for Cyber Defenders program. Previously, he was manager of the Advanced Systems Department of the California Weapons Systems Engi - neering Center, where he developed weapons system concepts and implemented strategies for nuclear deterrence. While at SNL, Mr. Talbot has also worked to develop and implement nuclear systems safety and security enhancements for the current and future nuclear weapons stockpile. David A. Whelan (NAE) is vice president and deputy general manager, Advanced Systems, and chief scientist, Integrated Defense Systems, at the Boeing Company. His areas of expertise include defense research and development of navigation and timing systems, autonomous air vehicles, and space-based-moving-target indicator radar systems. Prior to joining Boeing, he served as director of the Tacti - cal Technology Office at DARPA. His high-technology development experience includes roles as program manager for the Radar Systems Group of Hughes Air- craft Company, research physicist for the Lawrence Livermore National Labora- tory, and a lead low-observables design engineer for B-2A at Northrop Grumman Corporation. Dr. Whelan has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the Defense Science Board, the Air Force Scientific Advi - sory Board, and the NRC Committee on Research, Development, and Acquisition Options for the Special Operations Command (SOCOM). Dr. Whelan is a member of the HRL Laboratories board of directors and the National Academy of Engi - neering and is currently serving as the vice chair of the Naval Studies Board.