A
Committee and Staff Biographies

Paul G. Kaminski, Chair, is chairman and chief executive officer of Technovation, Inc., a consulting company dedicated to the development and application of advanced technology. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Kaminski served as the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology. In this position, he was responsible for all matters relating to Department of Defense (DOD) acquisition, including research and development, procurement, acquisition reform, dual-use technology, logistics, the defense technology and industrial base, and military construction. He has had a continuing career in the development and application of advanced technology in both the private and public sectors. His previous government experience also includes a 20-year career as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, where he directed the development of major stealth systems and national reconnaissance systems. Dr. Kaminski is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and chair of the Defense Science Board. He is a member of the FBI Director’s Advisory Board and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Technical Advisory Group. His awards include the National Medal of Technology, the DOD Medal for Distinguished Public Service (three awards), and the Defense Distinguished Service Medal.


Charles E. (Pete) Adolph has approximately 50 years’ experience in testing and evaluation and acquisition management. He started his career with General Dynamics Convair as a flight test engineer at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1956. Following 3 years in the U.S. Air Force, he held a variety of engineering and systems acquisition, technical, and management positions with the Air Force, advancing to technical director, the senior civilian position at the Air Force Flight



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A Committee and Staff Biographies Paul g. kaminski, Chair, is chairman and chief executive officer of Technova- tion, Inc., a consulting company dedicated to the development and application of advanced technology. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Kaminski served as the Under Secre- tary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology. In this position, he was responsi - ble for all matters relating to Department of Defense (DOD) acquisition, including research and development, procurement, acquisition reform, dual-use technology, logistics, the defense technology and industrial base, and military construction. He has had a continuing career in the development and application of advanced tech- nology in both the private and public sectors. His previous government experience also includes a 20-year career as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, where he directed the development of major stealth systems and national reconnaissance systems. Dr. Kaminski is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and chair of the Defense Science Board. He is a member of the FBI Director’s Advisory Board and the Senate Select Commit- tee on Intelligence Technical Advisory Group. His awards include the National Medal of Technology, the DOD Medal for Distinguished Public Service (three awards), and the Defense Distinguished Service Medal. Charles E. (Pete) Adolph has approximately 50 years’ experience in testing and evaluation and acquisition management. He started his career with General Dynamics Convair as a flight test engineer at Edwards Air Force Base, California, in 1956. Following 3 years in the U.S. Air Force, he held a variety of engineering and systems acquisition, technical, and management positions with the Air Force, advancing to technical director, the senior civilian position at the Air Force Flight 57

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58 expeRIMeNTaTION aND RapID pROTOTYpING IN SuppORT Of COuNTeRTeRRORISM Test Center. From 1987 to 1994, he held several positions in the Office of the Sec- retary of Defense. For most of that period he was director of Test and Evaluation, Acquisition, and Technology. He also served as acting director of Operational Test and Evaluation and acting director of Defense Research and Engineering. He was a senior vice president for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) from 1994 to 2000 and served as the manager of the SAIC testing and evaluation group. He is currently an independent consultant. Alfred O. Awani is director of advanced tactical laser transition at the Boe- ing Company. His expertise is in large-scale systems integration, engineering analysis, design and development, autonomous systems, directed-energy weapons systems, low-observables testing and evaluation, technology development and management, systems engineering and requirements development, platform inte - gration, and program management. He has held other key management positions at Boeing and was the Boeing Sikorsky Joint Program Office’s deputy director of systems engineering and chief of technology for the Boeing Sikorsky team on the Army Comanche RAH [Reconnaissance/Attack Helicopter]-66 program. Before joining Boeing, he was a research engineer at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Ames Research Center, involved in various advanced configuration developments. Dr. Awani was a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on the Identification of Promising Naval Aviation Science and Technology. W. Peter Cherry is chief analyst at Science Applications International Corpora- tion. His research areas include project organization, processes and procedures, and models and simulations used to support design and development and testing and evaluation strategies using virtual prototypes at the system-of-systems level. He has contributed to the development and fielding of most of the major weapons systems currently used by the U.S. Army—ranging from the Patriot missile sys- tem to the Apache helicopter—and command, control, and intelligence systems. Dr. Cherry is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. john D. Christie is senior fellow at LMI. He has an extensive background in Department of Defense (DOD) acquisition policy, program analysis, and resource allocation. He was the director of Acquisition Policy and Program Integration for the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition from 1989 to 1992. In that posi - tion he prepared a comprehensive revision of all defense acquisition policies and procedures, resulting in the cancellation and consolidation of 500 prior separate issuances. Dr. Christie also prepared comprehensive acquisition program alter- natives for the Secretary of Defense that resulted in multi-billion-dollar budget reductions. He has served on numerous DOD and NRC advisory committees and recently was a member of the NRC Oversight Committee for the Workshop on Testing for Dynamic Acquisition of Defense Systems.

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59 appeNDIx a Lee M. Hammarstrom is assistant to the director of the Applied Research Laboratory/Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU). Previously, he was the first chief scientist at the National Reconnaissance Office and chief scientist at the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence. Mr. Hammarstrom has broad expertise in areas ranging from technology development to the testing and deploying of military and intelligence systems. He has served on numerous scientific and advisory committees and is currently a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board and the NRC Standing Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Impro- vised Explosive Devices. Harry W. jenkins, jr., retired from the U.S. Marine Corps with the rank of major general and is currently an independent consultant. His background includes naval operations, mine countermeasures, and Marine Corps intelligence oper- ations, in particular, its mission use of command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems. He formerly served as director of business development and congressional liaison at ITT Industries-Defense, where he was responsible for activities in support of tactical communications systems and airborne electronic warfare with the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and National Guard. During Operation Desert Storm, General Jenkins served as the commanding general of the Fourth Marine Expe - ditionary Brigade. He formerly served as a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board and has participated in the work of nine committees, including the Com- mittee on the Role of Naval Forces in the Global War on Terror. Annette j. krygiel is an independent consultant with expertise in the manage- ment of large-scale systems, particularly in regard to software development and systems integration. She served as a distinguished visiting fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University, where she wrote a book on large-scale system integration. Prior to that, she was director of the Central Imagery Office (CIO), a Department of Defense combat support agency, until CIO joined the National Imagery and Mapping Agency in October 1996. Dr. Krygiel began her career at the Defense Mapping Agency, where she held various positions including chief scientist. Dr. Krygiel previously served as chair of the NRC Committee on the Role of Experimentation in Building Future Naval Forces. verne L. (Larry) Lynn is an independent consultant to industry and the Depart- ment of Defense. He is the former director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the principal agency within the DOD for research, development, and demonstration of concepts, devices, and systems for advanced military capabilities. He also served in the DOD as the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Advanced Technology. He has extensive knowledge of military

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60 expeRIMeNTaTION aND RapID pROTOTYpING IN SuppORT Of COuNTeRTeRRORISM organization and operations for research, development, and acquisition. Mr. Lynn is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Defense Science Board and served as chair of the NRC Committee on Strategies for Network Sci - ence, Technology, and Experimentation. Stephen D. Milligan is chief technical officer at BBN Technologies. In that capacity, he has technical oversight and access to all areas of BBN’s capabilities. Prior to being named chief technology officer, Dr. Milligan was chief scientist for systems and architectures and has been at BBN for 30 years. His research inter- ests include large-scale system architectures, distributed systems, agent-based systems, and evolutionary algorithms. Most recently, he was principal investiga- tor of the Boomerang Mobile Shooter Detection System, guiding all aspects of design and development and completing the project—from design to delivery—in just over 2 months. Boomerang earned the 2005 DARPA Significant Technical Achievement Award and is now deployed in Iraq. Arthur A. Morrish is vice president and chief technology officer of the Products Group at L-3 Communications. He has more than 19 years of experience as a manager and developer of technical solutions to DOD challenges. His back - ground includes the management of both people and programs in a high-risk, high-payoff, results-oriented environment. Dr. Morrish has extensive experience in developing and managing multi-million-dollar high-technology defense pro - grams from inception to advanced prototype and then transitioning them to the warfighter community. He also has a strong understanding of Special Operations needs and requirements based on his numerous interactions with that community in areas including unmanned air vehicles, advanced hybrid electric ground vehi - cles, sensor and detection systems, and sniper weapons. His prior position was as director of the Tactical Technology Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Dr. Morrish has received numerous government performance awards and has served on the Army Science Board. Stephen M. Robinson is professor emeritus in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research is in the development of quantitative methods for making the best use of scarce resources, which is part of the broad category of operations research methods. Dr. Robinson is a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Man - agement Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He previously served on the NRC Committee on Modeling and Simulation for Defense Transformation and on the NRC’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications. Ann E. Speed is a principal member of the technical staff at the Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico. She is a cognitive psychologist and has a back -

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61 appeNDIx a ground in memory, analogy, training, language acquisition, and operant mecha - nisms of behavior. She has worked in areas as varied as combining synthetic perceptive systems with synthetic cognitive systems to enhance physical security, improvised explosive device and terrorist network defeat, and computational models of group decision making. Dr. Speed is a member of the NRC Stand - ing Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices. H. Eugene Stanley is a university professor, professor of physics, and director of the Center for Polymer Studies at Boston University. His expertise includes sen- sors and polymeric materials, theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena for a wide range of systems including polymers, and applications of statistical mechanics to biology, economics, and medicine. Dr. Stanley is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and was a member of the NRC Committee on the Role of Naval Forces in the Global War on Terror. Staff Charles F. Draper is director of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board. Before joining the NRC in 1997, he was the lead mechanical engineer at S.T. Research Corporation, where he provided technical and pro - gram management support for satellite Earth station and small satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic-force microscope to measure the nanomechani - cal properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Inc., working onsite at NRL on the development of an underwater x-ray backscattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Marta v. Hernandez is an associate program officer with the NRC’s Naval Stud- ies Board (NSB). Prior to joining the NSB, she worked for the NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and National Materials Advisory Board. Ms. Hernandez joined the National Research Council in 2003 after graduating from the University of Maryland with a B.S. in materials science and engineering. Since then she has worked on a variety of projects, including ad hoc committees, standing commit - tees, roundtables, and proposal review panels for various sponsors within the Department of Defense and the materials community. Billy M. Williams is a senior program officer with the NRC’s NSB. Prior to joining the NSB, he served in a similar capacity with the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology, where he led projects associated with the U.S. Army’s Chemical Demilitarization program. Mr. Williams retired as a director of global

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62 expeRIMeNTaTION aND RapID pROTOTYpING IN SuppORT Of COuNTeRTeRRORISM research and development from the Dow Chemical Company in 2004 after 30 years of service. His career at Dow included directing analytical sciences and materials science in operations across the United States, Europe, and Asia. He also served as the company’s director of external science and technology pro- grams, with responsibility for developing and securing strategic technical partner- ships with leading research universities, national laboratories, and federal agen - cies. Mr. Williams earned an M.S. degree in organic chemistry and has completed executive education programs at Indiana University and Harvard University.