6Adapted from interviews with Grant Spickelmier and David Schaller and from the following evaluation report: Schaller, D., Haley Goldman, K., Spickelmeir, G., Allison-Bunnell, S., and Koepfler, S. (2009). Learning in the wild: What WolfQuest taught developers and game players. In J. Trant and D. Bearman (Eds.). Museums and the Web 2009: Proceedings. Toronto: Archives & Museum Informatics. Available: http://www.archimuse.com/mw2009/papers/schaller/schaller.html [accessed February 2010].

  

7Adapted from “A Burger, a Beer … and a Side of Science,” Nancy Linde, WGBH Boston. (2008). In R.E. Yager and J. Falk (Eds.). Exemplary Science in Informal Education Settings: Standards-Based Success Stories. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press.

  

8National Research Council. (1999). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning. J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

  

9National Research Council. (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School (expanded ed.). Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning. J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Chapter 2

  

1Aikenhead, G. (1996). Science education: Border crossing into the subculture of science. Studies in Science Education, 27, 1-52.

  

2Adapted from Bonney, R., “Citizen Science at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.” In R.E. Yager and J. Falk (Eds.). (2008). Exemplary Science in Informal Education Settings: Standards-Based Success Stories. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press.

  

3Storksdieck, M., and Falk, J.H. (2004). Evaluating public understanding of research projects and initiatives. In D. Chittendan, G. Farmelo, and B.V. Lewenstein (Eds.), Creating Connections—Museums and the Public Understanding of Research (pp. 87-108). Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.

  

4National Research Council. (2007). Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8. Committee on Science Learning, Kindergarten Through Eighth Grade. R.A. Duschl, H.A. Schweingruber, and A.W. Shouse (Eds.). Board on Science Education, Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

  

5Jolly, E., Campbell, P., and Perlman, L. (2004). Engagement, Capacity, Continuity: A Trilogy for Student Success. St. Paul: GE Foundation and Science Museum of Minnesota.

Tai, R.H., Liu, C.Q., Maltese, A.V., and Fan, X. (2006). Planning early for careers in science. Science, 312, 1143-1144.

  

6National Research Council. (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School (expanded ed.). Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning. J.D. Bransford, A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

  

7Osborne, J., Collins, S., Ratcliffe, M., Millar, R., and Duschl, R. (2003). What “ideas about science” should be taught in school science? A Delphi study of the expert community. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 40(7), 692-720.

  

8American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1993). Benchmarks for Science Literacy. New York: Oxford University Press.



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